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Courses

Fall 2021 

 
  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
4:15 - 6:15 PM

 

DHUM 70000 - Introduction to Digital Humanities (Online), Prof. Gold, #56338    
6:30 - 8:30 PM DHUM 73000 - Visualization and Design (Hybrid), Prof. McSweeney, #56271 DHUM 74000 - Digital Pedagogy 1: History, Theory, and Practice (Online), Prof. Silva, #56340 DHUM 78000 - Special Topics: Technology and Literature (Hybrid), Prof. Koch #58052 DHUM 70000 - Introduction to Digital Humanities (Online), Prof. Allred #56339

DHUM 70600 - Special Topics in Computational Fundamentals: JavaScript (Online), Prof. Zweibel, #64496, (6:30 - 7:30 P.M.)

Schedules by Semester

Fall 2021

DHUM 70000 - Introduction to Digital Humanities (Online) #56338

Tuesday, 4:15  - 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Matt Gold (MGold@gc.cuny.edu)

Note: We are offering two different sections of Intro to DH. This course will be online with synchronous class sessions.   

What are the digital humanities, and how can they help us think in new ways? This course offers an introduction to the landscape of digital humanities (DH) work, paying attention to how its various approaches embody new ways of knowing and thinking. What kinds of questions, for instance, does the practice of mapping pose to our research and teaching? When we attempt to share our work through social media, how is it changed? How can we read “distantly,” and how does “distant reading” alter our sense of what reading is?

Over the course of this semester, we will explore these questions and others as we engaging ongoing debates in the digital humanities, such as the problem of defining the digital humanities, the question of whether DH has (or needs) theoretical grounding, controversies over new models of peer review for digital scholarship, issues related to collaborative labor on digital projects, and the problematic questions surrounding research involving “big data.” The course will also emphasize the ways in which DH has helped transform the nature of academic teaching and pedagogy in the contemporary university with its emphasis on collaborative, student-centered and digital learning environments and approaches.

Among the themes and approaches we will explore are evidence, scale, representation, genre, quantification, visualization, and data. We will also discuss broad social, legal and ethical questions and concerns surrounding digital media and contemporary culture, including privacy, intellectual property, and open/public access to knowledge and scholarship.

Though no previous technical skills are required, students will be asked to experiment in introductory ways with DH tools and methods as a way of concretizing some of our readings and discussions. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and online postings (including on our course blog) and to undertake a final project that can be either a conventional seminar paper or a proposal for a digital project. Students completing the course will gain broad knowledge about and understanding of the emerging role of the digital humanities across several academic disciplines and will begin to learn some of the fundamental skills used often in digital humanities projects.

Note: this course is part of an innovative "Digital Praxis Seminar," a two-semester long introduction to digital tools and methods that will be open to all students in the Graduate Center. The goal of the course is to introduce graduate students to various ways in which they can incorporate digital research into their work.

 

DHUM 70000 - Introduction to Digital Humanities (Online) #56339

Thursday, 6:30  - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Jeff Allred (jeff.allred@hunter.cuny.edu)

Note: We are offering two different sections of Intro to DH. This course will be online with synchronous class sessions.

What are the digital humanities, and how can they help us think in new ways? This course offers an introduction to the landscape of digital humanities (DH) work, paying attention to how its various approaches embody new ways of knowing and thinking. What kinds of questions, for instance, does the practice of mapping pose to our research and teaching? When we attempt to share our work through social media, how is it changed? How can we read “distantly,” and how does “distant reading” alter our sense of what reading is?

Over the course of this semester, we will explore these questions and others as we engaging ongoing debates in the digital humanities, such as the problem of defining the digital humanities, the question of whether DH has (or needs) theoretical grounding, controversies over new models of peer review for digital scholarship, issues related to collaborative labor on digital projects, and the problematic questions surrounding research involving “big data.” The course will also emphasize the ways in which DH has helped transform the nature of academic teaching and pedagogy in the contemporary university with its emphasis on collaborative, student-centered and digital learning environments and approaches.

Among the themes and approaches we will explore are evidence, scale, representation, genre, quantification, visualization, and data. We will also discuss broad social, legal and ethical questions and concerns surrounding digital media and contemporary culture, including privacy, intellectual property, and open/public access to knowledge and scholarship.

Though no previous technical skills are required, students will be asked to experiment in introductory ways with DH tools and methods as a way of concretizing some of our readings and discussions. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and online postings (including on our course blog) and to undertake a final project that can be either a conventional seminar paper or a proposal for a digital project. Students completing the course will gain broad knowledge about and understanding of the emerging role of the digital humanities across several academic disciplines and will begin to learn some of the fundamental skills used often in digital humanities projects.

Note: this course is part of an innovative "Digital Praxis Seminar," a two-semester long introduction to digital tools and methods that will be open to all students in the Graduate Center. The goal of the course is to introduce graduate students to various ways in which they can incorporate digital research into their work.
 

DHUM 70600 - Special Topics in Computational Fundamentals: JavaScript (Online) #64496

Thursday, 6:30 - 7:30 PM, 1 Credit, Prof. Stephen Zweibel (Szweibel@gc.cuny.edu)  

Note: This is a 1-credit, 1-hour lab course, with synchronous online class sessions.   

This is a basic introduction to JavaScript, which is the programming language of the web. The class is designed for anyone interested in developing a website, or creating an interactive data visualization. By the end of this course, you will be able to read JavaScript you find online, and adapt it to your needs. You will have an opportunity to work with common JavaScript libraries/tools.

 

DHUM 73000 - Visualization and Design (Hybrid) #56271

Monday, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Michelle McSweeney 
(michelleamcsweeney@gmail.com)  
Cross-listed with DATA 73000

Note: Hybrid, with option to take purely online. In-person class dates are 8/30, 9/13, 9/20, 10/11, 10/18, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, and 12/13. Online synchronous class dates are 10/14, 11/1, and 12/6. 

Data is everywhere and the ability to manipulate, visualize, and communicate with data effectively is an essential skill for nearly every sector—public, private, academic, and beyond. Grounded in both theory and practice, this course will empower students to visualize data through hands-on experience with industry-standard tools and techniques and equip students with the knowledge to justify data analysis strategies and design decisions.

Using Tableau Software, students will build a series of interactive visualizations that combine data and logic with storytelling and design. We will dive into cleaning and structuring unruly data sets, identify which chart types work best for different types of data, and unpack the tactics behind effective visual communication. With an eye towards critical evaluation of both data and method, projects and discussions will be geared towards humanities and social science research. Regardless of academic concentration, students develop a portfolio of interactive and dynamic data visualization dashboards and an interdisciplinary skill set ready to leverage in academic and professional work.

By the end of this class, students will be able to: 
  • Build interactive data visualization dashboards that answer a clear and purposeful research question;
  • Choose which chart type works best for different types of data; 
  • Iterate with fluidity in Tableau Software leveraging visualization, aesthetic, and user interface best practices; 
  • Structure thoughtful critiques and communicate technical questions and solutions; Leverage collaborative tools, including Tableau Public, Wordpress, and repositories of public data sets;
  • Contribute to the broader conversation about digital practices in academic research;
  • Critically read a wide range of chart types with an eye for accuracy, audience, and effectiveness; 
  • Identify potential weaknesses in the collection methods and structure of underlying data sets Locate the original source of a visualization and its data.
 

DHUM 74000 - Digital Pedagogy 1: History, Theory, and Practice (Online) # 56340

Tuesday, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Andie Silva (asilva@york.cuny.edu)

Note: This course will be online, with synchronous class sessions.

Students will examine the economic, social, and intellectual history of the design and use of technology. This course will focus particularly on the power of digital pedagogy as feminist praxis, which aims to centralize race, gender, class, and queer perspectives in academic debates. Readings in the course will focus on the history and development of the uses of technology in the classroom and academia alongside current attempts to critique how technology can reproduce structures of power and systems of oppression. We will also explore the unique ways digital humanities has transformed the classroom, and collaborate in defining clear goals for using and teaching new technologies, from engaging students in digital project analyses to teaching code and markup languages. Assignments for this course will include the development of shared resources for teaching and learning with technology, evaluations of projects with pedagogical components, as well as forays into project-based learning within fields such as digital editing, preservation and curation, and gaming.  

introduce graduate students to various ways in which they can incorporate digital research into their work.
 

DHUM 78000 - Special Topics: Technology and Literature (Hybrid) #58052

Wednesday, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Erec R. Koch
(ekoch@gc.cuny.edu)  

Note: Hybrid, with option to take purely online. In-person class dates are 8/25, 9/22, 10/6, 10/20, 11/3, 11/17, and 12/1. Online dates are 9/1, 9/29, 10/13, 10/27, 11/10, 11/24, and 12/7. 

In this course, we will explore the question of how digital technology has (re-)shaped and continues to (re-)shape literary and cultural studies.  Specifically, what difference does digital technology make for literary and cultural studies by providing platforms for research, formal and informal means of communication, and scholarly tools? What questions pertinent to literary and cultural studies does digital technology help us to address, and what questions does it necessarily elide?  The course will be organized around a series of problematics beginning with a critical assessment of another technological revolution, the passage from “oral culture” to print culture.  Subsequent topics will include the exploration of what information and data are and how they are pertinent to literary studies—how does information map onto literary and cultural studies?--, the question of formats (print/digital), the effects of technological centralization/decentralization on literary and cultural research, the tension between consumer and reader on the internet, the articulation of collaborative and individual research, and finally whether digital technology compels us to rethink what the fields of literature and culture include.  We will also explore some of the new directions that literary and cultural studies have taken, and particularly the elaboration of new (macro) literary and cultural histories.  We will attend to specific methodologies and tools employed by those researchers and focus on the question of the articulation of information and of literary and cultural interpretation, on the passage from one to the other, and on how such macro-histories can inform the work of traditional scholarly research.

Readings for this course will include works by Walter J. Ong, Dennis Tenen, Luciano Floridi, David Golumbia, James Smithies, Sherry Turkle and Wendy HK Chun, among others, in the first part of the course.  The second will include writings by Katherine Bode, Matthew Jockers, Alan Liu, and Cristophe Schuwey.

Students are not expected to have taken previous DH course work, and students in DH as well as in literary and cultural studies are encouraged to enroll.  Students are asked to participate actively in class discussions and to post weekly directed responses to readings. Students will have the option of writing a final term paper or of designing a DH literary-cultural project.


Recommended Elective:

PSYC 80103 - Using Archives in Social Justice Research (Hybrid) #57279

Tuesday, 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM, 3 Credits. Prof. Susan Opotow (sopotow@jjay.cuny.edu

Note: Instructor consent required. Prof. Opotow hopes for some in-person sessions, dates TBA; if entirely online, class sessions will be synhronous. Course modality info here will be updated later.

Archives offer rich textual and material data that can deepen our understanding of societal issues. They can place individual and collective social justice efforts within particular socio-political and historical contexts.  The graduate course is designed to foster students’ knowledge, skills, and strategies for using physical, digital, or hybrid archives to study research questions of interest to them.  The course, grounded in the social science and humanities literatures on archival theory and practice, will deepen students’ knowledge of archive as a construct, a societal resource, and a repository vulnerable to politicization. To learn how social science and humanities scholars use archives to advance social justice, we read, for example, about community-based archives; archives documenting oppression and human rights; and archival ethics. Alongside our attention to theory and method, this is also structured as a studio course in its attention to the empirical development of students’ ideas and research.  By the course's end, students will have begun and progressed on their own archival projects.

Summer 2021

Past Courses

Spring 2021

Note: All Spring 2021 courses will be online. 

DHUM 70002 - Digital Humanities: Methods and Practices #64010
Thursday, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Bret Maney (bret.maney@lehman.cuny.edu)

During the Fall 2020 semester, students explored the landscape of the digital humanities, considering a range of ways to approach DH work and conceive of and propose potential DH projects. In the spring, we will put that thinking into action by refining and producing a small number of those projects. This praxis-oriented course will ask students to organize into teams and, by the end of the semester, produce a project prototype. Upon completion of the course, students will have gained hands-on experience in the conceptualizing, planning, production, and dissemination of a digital humanities project. Student work for this course will demonstrate a variety of technical, project management, and rhetorical skills. One of our goals is to produce well-conceived, long-term projects that have the potential to extend beyond the Spring 2021 semester. A range of advisors may be matched to support the needs of each individual project. Successful completion of the course will require a commitment to meeting mutually agreed-upon deadlines and benchmarks established at the outset of the semester.

The class will hold a public event at the end of the semester where students will launch their projects and receive feedback from the DH academic community.

Note: This course follows "Introduction to Digital Humanities" from the Fall 2020 semester.

DHUM 72700 - Remote Archival Encounters #64011
Tuesday, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Profs. Duncan Faherty (duncan.faherty@qc.cuny.edu) and Lisa Rhody (lrhody@gc.cuny.edu) 

In “Remote Archival Encounters” we will take an interdisciplinary and participatory approach to archival research. In so doing, we will attend to how current health protocols have fundamentally shifted the practice and possibilities of working with archival materials. Part seminar, part individualized research tutorial, part laboratory, part skills workshop, this course will combine traditional scholarly practices with emergent ones through analog and digital methods. We will consider new modes of access (for both scholarly and public audiences) to archival materials, paying attention to how our current situation has limited physical access to materials. By the end of the course, students will assemble a portfolio that articulates the challenges to archival research, approaches scholars may take to continuing their work, regular short public writing about archival research during troubled times, and a plan for how to move their individual research forward in the coming year.
 
The course will have four main units, including an introduction to current scholarly debates about the politics of archival work (readings may include work by Lisa Lowe, Jennifer Morgan, Britt Russert, and David Kazanjian), virtual “field visits” with archivists and librarians (crafted in response to the interests of the enrolled students), training in textual editing and book history (readings may include Greetham’s Textual Scholarship, McGann’s Radiant Textuality, Hayles and Pressman’s Comparative Textual Media), and workshops in digital research methods, platforms, annotation and encoding, and design (including but not limited to Archive Grid, HathiTrust, Bitcurator,    JStor Labs, Omeka, and Tropy). Students will have an opportunity to interact with curators and archivists working at the various libraries, repositories, and special collections with which we aim to partner (including such possibilities as The New York Public Library, The Morgan Library, The New-York Historical Society, The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The Library for the Performing Arts,The Lesbian Herstory Archives, and the Interfernce Archive).
 
The course will provide PhD students the opportunity to advance (or experiment with) their own research agendas by pursuing further study in archival research, book history, and scholarly editing. For students in the MA in Digital Humanities program, projects could be expanded to form a digital capstone project--a requirement for completion of the degree.
 
Course Requirements: Active and engaged participation, a brief oral presentation, weekly reflections, a project outline, a brief mid-semester progress report, and a final portfolio of the student’s own design.

DHUM 73700 - Geospatial Humanities #64164
Wednesday, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Shipeng Sun (shipeng.sun@hunter.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with DATA 78000 #64009
Website

This course combines an introduction to basic cartographic theory and techniques in humanities contexts with practical experience in the analysis, manipulation, and the graphical representation of spatial information. The course examines the storage, processing, compilation, and symbolization of spatial data; basic spatial analysis; and visual design principles involved in conveying spatial information. Emphasis is placed on digital mapping technologies, including online and offline computer based geographic information science tools.

DHUM 74500 - Digital Pedagogy 2: Theory, Design, and Practice #64013
Monday, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Shawna M. Brandle (shawna.brandle@kbcc.cuny.edu)

In the first digital pedagogy course, students were introduced to the history and contexts within which technology has been integrated into teaching, learning, and research at the college level. In the second core course, students will continue with that investigation as they begin to carve out space for their own work.  In Spring 2021, the course will focus on opening our digital pedagogy- exploring open educational resources and open pedagogy, along with related opens: open access and open GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums).  

The focus of the course reading will be on the why’s, how’s, and where’s of open educational practices, with a special focus on critical digital pedagogy.  By the end of the semester students will produce a polished proposal for a multimedia-based project in their discipline related to research, pedagogy, or both.  The course incorporates hands-on exploration of educational uses of new-media applications and open possibilities. The course will use an open pedagogy approach to teaching and learning, beginning with a co-created syllabus wherein students will have significant say in the selection of readings and assignments. 

DHUM 78000-01 - Digital Memories: Theory and Practice #64012
Wednesday, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Aránzazu Borrachero (aranzazubm@msn.com)

Memory Studies, an interdisciplinary field focusing on "how, what and why individuals, groups and societies remember, and forget" (Memory Studies), has experienced important paradigm shifts since its inception in the 1980s. The onset of digital media is responsible for the latest and, arguably, most radical changes.
 
This course explores how the past is constructed, archived and communicated through digital media from a sociocritical angle:
 
* What is the potential of digital memory and storytelling projects to change or break power structures?
* Has digital technology opened spaces for contesting traditional narratives of the past?
* Is civic action shaped by digital memory initiatives? Are digital memory initiatives shaped by civic action?
 
With these questions as a framework, students will analyze key concepts in Memory Studies, such as collective memory (Maurice Halbwachs), cultural memory (Aleida and Jan Assman), transnational memory (Astrid Erll), and postmemory (Marianne Hirsch) --concepts, all of them, interrogated by the emerging field of Digital Memory Studies (Andrew Hoskins). Armed with this theoretical work, students will examine a diversity of digital memory and storytelling projects, from well-established and institutionalized ones (e.g. Imperial War Museums, Forced Labor 1939-1945, Memorial Democràtic) to community-led projects and/or projects explicitly engaged in counter-hegemonic memory-making (e.g. 858 Archive, Documenting the Now, Torn Apart/Separados).
 
This course utilizes a project-based pedagogical approach to the study of Digital Memory. Students will design and develop their own storytelling and memory projects guided, step by step, by a team of expert developers of digital tools for cultural heritage and oral history archives. Besides acquiring skills to create narrative projects, students will become acquainted with tools currently used to build digital archives. They will learn project design, content collection, content management and analysis, and online publication.

DHUM 78000-02 - Special Topics in DH: Alternative Data Cultures #64163
Monday, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Kevin Ferguson (kferguson@qc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with DATA 78000 #64008

This course will examine alternative trajectories of data visualization that lie outside of the traditional approaches that aim to represent data as neutrally and naturally as possible. Beginning with Lisa Samuels and Jerome McGann's concept of “deformance”—a new scholarly performance of a text that eschews solely searching for a hidden interpretation—we will survey a variety of ways that data visualization centered on humanistic inquiry can be recontextualized, remixed, and otherwise bent, broken, and glitched in order to generate new knowledge. By considering how data visualization might fruitfully embrace subjective perspectives in order to create meaning, this course will ask students to more deeply consider how and why we visualize complex data sets, including sets of objects such as literary corpora, photographs, motion pictures, and music. 

Throughout the course we will explore the intersection of aesthetics, art, and alternative ways of “performing” data to reveal new insights, drawing on surrealist and other avant-garde traditions that begin with defamiliarization as a critical practice. In addition to readings and models of new perspectives on data visualization, students will complete experimental projects visualizing a variety of texts, which may include condensing feature films to single images, comparative movie “barcodes,” glitching historical images, and other experimental exploratory data visualization. Students may complete exploratory projects in ImageJ (Java), Python, and/or R, although no prior expertise is required of students.

Readings may include: Johanna Drucker, Mark Sample, Zach Whalen, Jason Mittell, Deb Verhoeven, Michael J. Kramer, Stephen Ramsay, Lev Manovich, Julia Flanders, Eric Hoyt, Shane Denson, Giorgia Lupi and Stefanie Posavec, Virginia Kuhn, and Bethany Nowviskie.

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