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Spring 2022

Spring 2022 registration begins November 30, 2021. 

HIST 80020- Literature Survey in European History
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Elissa Bemporad
In-person

   Description forthcoming.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
 
 
HIST 80010- Literature Survey in American History
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Prof. KC Johnson

Hybrid  
   Description forthcoming.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
 
HIST 87950 - Historical Literature of the Middle East, 1790-1923
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Lale Can
Hybrid
This course provides an introduction to the main themes and approaches in the history and historiography of the Middle East in the long 19th century, from roughly the late 1700s through the First World War. Our primary geographical focus will be regions under the rule of the Ottoman Empire and, to a lesser extent, Qajar Iran. Drawing on works of classic literature and important new scholarship, the course will cover themes such as state-building and governance; religious authority, identity, and sectarianism; economic and labor history; gender and law; histories of medicine and the environment; legal reform and modernization; migration; and the impact of imperialism and globalization. Students who complete the course will have a solid grounding in the literature of the Middle East, which will serve as a basis for preparation for oral exams as well as for future teaching and research. Most classes will be in-person. The History section is open only to PhD Program in History students. Other students should register for MAMES 73900.

HIST 84900- First year Seminar in History
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Sarah Covington  
In-person

   Description forthcoming.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.


HIST 84900- Advanced Research Seminar 
Tuesdays, 11:45 am - 1:45 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Thomas Kessner
Hybrid
 
In this course students will complete a 30- 40 page research paper of publishable quality.  The paper should be based on primary sources and current secondary sources, engage with a clearly defined historiographical problem, and reflect a high level of attention to prose and professional disciplinary standards.  In class, we will discuss research methods and writing strategies and workshop in-progress drafts. 
Students should identify a topic (with accessible sources) for their paper before the first meeting of the course.  The topic should be significantly different from the student's first year seminar paper but may constitute a piece of research that leads toward a dissertation.  The course is only open to students in the PhD Program in History who have completed the first year seminar.  

 
HIST 89900- Dissertation Seminar
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 0 credits,  Prof. David Waldstreicher
Hybrid

Open only to Level 3 PhD Program in History students.
 
 
HIST 71600 - Modern Germany and the World
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Steven Remy

In-person            
   Description forthcoming.
 
HIST 72300 - Anti-Racism in Comparative-Historical Perspective
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00 pm,  3 credits, Prof. John Torpey
In-person            
This course addresses the changing meaning of “antiracism” from the founding of the United States to the present day.  We will explore the varying meanings of the idea of antiracism in the context of the times in which they were set.  Readings will range from commentary on the American Constitution to the arguments of today’s “neo-universalists” and may include the writings of Nikole Hannah-Jones, Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Dubois, Ida Wells, James Baldwin, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, the Report of the Kerner Commission, Bob Blauner, George Fredrickson, Kimberle’ Crenshaw, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Ibram X. Kendi, Robin DiAngelo, Adolph Reed, Toure’ Reed, Randall Kennedy, Rogers Brubaker, John McWhorter, Ian Haney-Lopez, Wesley Yang, Ruy Teixeira, and John Halpin.  Class discussion will be the heart of the course; students will be expected to do all the readings and be prepared to discuss them.

HIST 72800- Twentieth Century American Foundations
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Kathleen McCarthy
Instructor permission is required to enroll in this course. Please write to KMcCarthy@gc.cuny.edu with a cc to mweber@gc.cuny.edu  
Hybrid
This course is designed to teach students interested in Public History to do historically-based program reviews for institutional decision making, with a focus on grantmaking foundations. It will include scholarly and archival readings keyed to the students’ topics, discussions about their research, and presentations by foundation practitioners to provide insights into how the big foundations work and the rationales behind their programs.
  The course requirement is a 10-15-page paper based on original research in the foundation collections at the Rockefeller Archive Center [RAC] in Pocantico, Hills, NY, which houses the historical records of the Rockefeller, Ford, Russell Sage, Henry Luce, William and Flora Hewlett, Near East and Markle Foundations, and the Commonwealth and Rockefeller Brothers Funds (among many other materials).  These materials cover a broad swath of U.S. and global History, from women’s, minority, and other social justice campaigns, to the colonial devolution; scientific, agricultural, and social science research; public health and the arts and humanities in the United States and around the world.  Many of these collections have not previously been used, offering an important opportunity for original research. Information about the RAC’s holdings, including finding aids are available at https://rockarch.org.  Prospective students are strongly advised to consult RAC’s collections and contact their reference staff about potential topics.
Students interested in this course are invited to apply for special funding. Details here (note the deadline of Nov 10).
Doctoral students in the History program may elect to register for an associated 2 credit independent study to satisfy the requirement for seminar paper. (Those wishing to pursue that option should write to EO Joel Allen along with Prof. McCarthy [KMcCarthy@gc.cuny.edu], and should cc APO Marilyn Weber.)


HIST 73900- Britain and the World, 1750-Present
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Tim Alborn
In-person
    This course explores Britain’s rise and fall as an imperial power between 1750 and the present, with a focus on the spaces, goods, and people that have framed, moved, and settled in and among British territories and trading partners—including colonial America and the US, India, Ireland, Jamaica, and Australia.  Each of the three assignments in the course enables students to learn and apply a specific professional skill to the study of British history: historiography, fluency with primary-source databases, and constructive criticism. 

 
 
HIST 74300 - Gendered Justice in Europe and the Americas c.1350- 1750
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Sara McDougall

Hybrid
The course will explore the role of gender in the prosecution and punishment of crime in social and cultural context in Europe and the Americas c.1350-1750. We will examine gender and justice as it intersected with race, religion, and status, as found in the Atlantic World, and particularly the French and Iberian metropoles and colonies. Our main body of evidence will be trial records, including litigation, witness testimony, confessions, and sentences. In addition we will engage with a range of other source materials such as law codes, prison records and the writings of incarcerated persons, newspaper reports, true crime narratives, and images of alleged criminals and crime. Training in these subjects welcome but not a requirement, this will be an interdisciplinary inquiry open to graduate and professional students in the humanities and social sciences and related fields.
 
HIST 74900 -  Police, Prisons, and Repression in the United Stated of America 
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Johanna Fernandez

In-person
This course examines the rise and role of jails, prisons, police and repression in the United States beginning with emergent reformulations of punishment in the early years of the republic and the proclamations on imprisonment and involuntary servitude in the Northwest Ordinance of 1787. The course covers the founding, by the Pennsylvania Quakers, of the first modern US prison in 1790 and analyzes the expansion of prisons during two turning points in American History. First in the late 19th century during the era of Reconstruction and the Second Industrial Revolution and again one hundred years later beginning in the 1970s— in the decades immediately following the civil rights and black power movements, at a time of domestic and global economic restructuring. The course tracks the origins of slave patrols —the earliest police units in the US — charged with capturing and returning escaped enslaved Africans back to southern plantations and the later expansion and professionalization of police after World War I in the context of labor unrest, left radicalization and the rise of the second KKK. We explore the link between imprisonment and political repression as seen in the Salem Witch trials, the trials and hangings of Haymarket labor activists in Chicago in the late 19th Century; the executions of Italian immigrant anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti in the 1920s and Ethel and Julius Rosenberg in the 1950s; and the failed attempts at execution in the case of Black Panther Mumia Abu-Jamal in the 1990s. The course ends with an analysis of developments in the last fifty years in the US — the rise of hyper incarceration of poor, Black American and Latinx communities in deindustrializing cities and of migrants in the US-Mexico border. We explore the meaning of police militarization and it’s expansion in the context of the cold war and the explosion of the carceral state as the country’s third largest employer in the 21st century.
 
HIST 75000 – Democracy: America’s Other ‘Peculiar Institution’
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Andrew Robertson

In-person
     Alexis de Tocqueville frequently used the term particulier to describe American democracy in the 1830s.  Translated into English, that word can mean special, unique, or peculiar.  This course describes the ways in which American democracy became a “peculiar institution.”  Like slavery, democratic beliefs and practices in the United States adapted to the political and social context of the early republic and the antebellum era.  The first part of this course will consider the culture and practice of American democracy from the American Revolution to the Civil War.  The second part of this course will focus on nineteenth-century democracy from a transnational perspective, looking at democratic practices in Latin America and in Europe.  The last part of this course will consider U.S. democracy in the recent past and present, focusing finally on the long trajectory of American democracy, in its fits and starts and in its present peril.
 
HIST 75500 –  Migration Control and Migrant Agency: Mobility in U.S. History
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Libby Garland

In-person
How and why has state power been deployed to control the mobility of people across and within the borders of the United States, from the early days of the nation’s existence through recent decades? In what ways have regimes of migration control been central to the projects of empire and nation-building? How has the policing of human mobility intersected with other forms of surveillance and control—for example of race, gender, sexuality, and labor? And when and how have people on the move challenged state efforts to control their mobility? Where do those challenges overlap with other forms of political struggle and movement building? How might these histories shape our understandings of the present moment? In this course, we will engage with the work of historians who explore such questions from a range of perspectives, including legal, political, and social History; border studies; and more. Through close reading, discussion, and a longer research project, students will have the opportunity to develop their own scholarly work around these and related issues as well.
 
HIST 75800 - The Gotham Seminar: Cultural Histories of New York City, 1620-2020
Fridays, 11:45 am - 1:45 pm, 3 credits,  Prof. David Waldstreicher
In-person
   Description forthcoming.
 
HIST 78110: Palestine under the Mandate
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30, 3 credits, Prof. Simon Davis
In-person
This course examines how British imperial policy at the time of the First World War, and subsequently, pursued control over Palestine, proceeding to consequent transformations for Palestine's peoples. How relationships evolved with Zionism and with new Arab Palestinian political and social forces will be crucial to examining successive crises culminating in 1948. Particular themes will be explored through analytical discussions of assigned historiographic materials, chiefly recent primary research-based journal literature.
 
HIST 78400 - The Scientific Revolution: Copernicus to Newton, 1450-1700
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Joseph Dauben
In-person
   Description forthcoming.