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Spring 2022

For all registration dates and deadlines, see the GC academic calendar.

Please note that this schedule is subject to change. Course descriptions are forthcoming, and there is a possibility that more cross-listed courses will be added.

2-4 Credit Grading System
2 credit courses= Pass or Fail option
4 credit courses= Letter grade


CL 80100 (2, 4 credits)/SPAN 82100(3 credits): Cervantes and Don Quixote: Reading, Rereading, Visualizing, Tuesdays, 4:15pm-6:15pm, Prof. Paul Smith, (ONLINE)
 
CL 80100 (2, 4 credits)/FRE 85000(2-4 credits): Sentiment, Affect, Sensation: Forms of Desire in the Nineteenth-Century French Novel, Mondays, 4:15-6:15pm, Prof. Bettina Lerner
 
CL 85000 (2-4 credits) MALS 77100 (3 credits)//FSCP 81000 (3 credits): Television Aesthetics: A Comparative Approach to Television Drama, Tuesdays6:30pm-8:30pm, Prof. Giancarlo Lombardi, Tuesdays, 6:30pm-8:30pm, Prof. Giancarlo Lombardi
 
CL 85500 (2, 4 credits): Banned Books in Russia and Beyond: Writing, Reading, and Publishing as a Transgression, Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Prof. Yasha Klots
 
CL 88100 (2, 4 credits) /MSCP 80500(3 credits): Dante’s Purgatorio, Wednesdays, 4:15pm-6:15pm, Prof. Paola Ureni
 
CL 89000 (2, 4 credits): Memory and Temporality: Erich Auerbach and, Walter Benjamin, and their Legacy in Fiction, Mondays, 2:00pm-4:00pm (ONLINE), Prof. Martin Elsky

CL 89200: History of Literary Theory & Criticism II, Tuesdays, 2:00pm-4:00pm, 4 credits, Prof. Charity Scribner
 
CTCP 71088: Critical Theory:  Foundations and Practices, Thursdays, 2:00pm-4:00pm, 3 credits, Prof. Vincent Crapanzano

Codes for Registering on Record/WIU
Registered on Record: 53585
Weight Instructional Unit 1: 53584
Weight Instructional Unit 2: 53583
Weight Instructional Unit 3: 53582
Weight Instructional Unit 4: 53581
Weight Instructional Unit 5: 53580
Weight Instructional Unit 6: 53579
Weight Instructional Unit 7: 53578

Course Descriptions: 

CL 80100 (2, 4 credits)/SPAN 82100(3 credits): Cervantes and Don Quixote: Reading, Rereading, Visualizing, Tuesdays, 4:15pm-6:15pm, Prof. Paul Smith, (ONLINE)

This course involves three aspects to be treated each week: first, a close collective reading of the text of Cervantes’s masterpiece; second, an analysis of the rereading of Don Quixote by later authors from Proust and Nabokov to Lukacs, Primo Levi, and García Márquez; and, finally, an introduction to the varied audiovisual versions of Cervantes’ original text, from different periods and countries. The course will be graded by final paper (50%), midterm exam (25%), and final presentation, weekly postings to course website, and oral contribution to class (25%).​

CL 80100 (2, 4 credits)/FRE 85000(2-4 credits): Sentiment, Affect, Sensation: Forms of Desire in the Nineteenth-Century French Novel, Mondays, 4:15-6:15pm, Prof. Bettina Lerner

This course construes desire as constitutive of modern narrative and of the nineteenth-century French novel in particular. We will examine how sentimental, realist, and decadent novels configure desire differently through character and plot. We’ll also see how these configurations are challenged by a range of affects that emerge, often within the same texts, to reveal the mediated and constructed dimensions of attraction and longing. The course also asks us to consider not just the forms of erotic desire that are developed in these novels but, in a period marked by revolution and social change, we will pay close attention to texts that explicitly tie desire to political aspiration. These explorations may ultimately help us address the question of the century’s desire for the novel and the sensations it provokes over and above all other literary forms. Novels and novellas will likely include Stendhal’s Le Rouge et le noir; Claire de Duras’s Ourika; Honoré de Balzac’s La Fille aux yeux d’or; Gustave Flaubert’s L’Éducation sentimentale; Jules Vallès’s L’Enfant; and Rachilde’s Monsieur Vénus. Our definitions of desire will be informed and challenged by theorists and critics including Roland Barthes, Leo Bersani, Peter Brooks, Georges Bataille, Gilles Deleuze, René Girard, and Raymond Williams and will engage with recent debates associated with the work of Lauren Berlant and Joan Copjec among others.

CL 85000 (2-4 credits) MALS 77100 (3 credits)//FSCP 81000 (3 credits): Television Aesthetics: A Comparative Approach to Television Drama, Tuesdays6:30pm-8:30pm, Prof. Giancarlo Lombardi, Tuesdays, 6:30pm-8:30pm, Prof. Giancarlo Lombardi

This course seeks to understand television drama as an aesthetic object, through a deep analysis of its formal structures tightly informed by several critical methodologies ranging from semiotics and psychoanalysis to cultural studies and deconstruction. We will set out to understand how television makes meaning through the consideration of its aural and visual components as aesthetic objects and will do so in a comparative context that will place American television drama in conversation with similar productions from Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Each week, students will be asked to watch a full season of a television series and will be asked to analyze it at home and during class discussion. Series will include Scenes from a Marriage, Mare of Eastwood, Succession, The Affair (US) as well as Squid Game (Korea), Bad Banks (Germany), Borgen (Denmark), The Paper (Croatia), Beforeigners (Norway), Lupin (France), Money Heist (Spain), 3% (Brazil), and various productions of In Treatment from all over the world. Among its chief learning goals, the course will foster (1) knowledge of primary methods and theoretical frameworks of television analysis; (2) application of such methods and frameworks through textual close reading of the television text; (3) written production of competent television criticism informed by such methods and frameworks

CL 85500 (2, 4 credits): Banned Books in Russia and Beyond: Writing, Reading, and Publishing as a Transgression”, Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Prof. Yasha Klots

The course explores works that were banned, censored, or never submitted for publication at home but often smuggled out of the country and published extraterritorially. While most case studies will be drawn from the twentieth-century Russian and East-European geo-political and cultural contexts, we will address comparable examples from other parts of the world. The readings will include both historical and theoretical sources on book history, censorship and repression, archives and library science, which we will incorporate into our analysis of the primary texts on their way from the drawer to the reader abroad or in the underground domestically.    

CL 88100 (2, 4 credits) /MSCP 80500(3 credits): Dante’s Purgatorio, Wednesdays, 4:15pm-6:15pm, Prof. Paola Ureni

This course intends to read Dante’s Purgatorio in relation to medieval intellectual debates, and with constant reference to the Inferno and anticipation of the Paradiso. The intermediate condition expressed by the second canticle involves both formal and content levels, and will be investigated according to both. The Purgatorio’s significance of rebirth and freedom from Inferno’s hopeless sinful state mirrors a sense of recovered harmony, which involves individual and non-individual dimensions, as it encompasses theological, cosmological, philosophical, and scientific discussions on different forms of harmony and balance. We will consider the intersections among these different fields of medieval knowledge. Through the study of Dante’s conception of poetic creation in the Purgatorio, we will highlight how thirteenth-century Italian poetry shares its roots and its creative moment – as well as a lexicon – with scientific investigations and philosophical discussions that range from the Aristotelian tradition to the Augustinian trend. The inclusion of a scientific approach to Dante’s text, far from lessening theological and philosophical dimensions, will allow investigating them through a particular lens. Through our reading of the Purgatorio we will explore the impact of science – even, more specifically, of medicine – on philosophical and theological debates, as well as the literary response to such discussion. Following a scientific thread intertwined with philosophy and theology, we will identify more specific themes, such as synderesis and free will, and we will investigate the role of faculties such as imagination and memory. We will explore the intersection between medicine and theology through the reading of physical and mental conditions during natural sleep, dreaming, somnolentia, as well as states of mind assimilable to different degrees of astonishments or even ecstatic states, which mark the pilgrim’s ascent of the mountain of Purgatory. Finally, besides the necessary allusions to the other two canticle of the poem, our reading of the Purgatorio will include references to other Dantean works such as the Convivio and the Vita Nova.

CL 89000 (2, 4 credits): Memory and Temporality: Erich Auerbach and, Walter Benjamin, and their Legacy in Fiction, Mondays, 2:00pm-4:00pm (ONLINE), Prof. Martin Elsky

The conceptual starting point of this course is the intellectual exchange and friendship between Erich Auerbach and Walter Benjamin that began in the Staatsbibliothek of Berlin in the 1920s. The course brings their widely influential work into focus in relation to contemporary memory studies, on the one hand, and twenty-first century memory (auto-)fiction, on the other. We will examine the idea of multi-layered temporalities of memory and trauma in personally and culturally disruptive historical moments, as in the work of Jan Assmann, Yifat Gutman, and Andreas Huyssen.  We will explore how these notions appear in the seminal literary-historical work of Auerbach and Benjamin: we will consider how Auerbach conceives of overlapping and displacing temporalities at junctures of historical change from Jewish, Christian, and secular eras, and we will consider the various ways the past uncannily disrupts the present in Benjamin’s messianically inflected thinking. Finally, we will look at how these trends influenced a new genre of fiction begun by W. G. Sebald and  in two writers who share his legacy -- Jenny Erpenbeck and Teju Cole.

CL 89200: History of Literary Theory & Criticism II, Tuesdays, 2:00pm-4:00pm, 4 credits, Prof. Charity Scribner

This course is a study of the thought about literature as it has developed from the late eighteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Readings range from Kant to Horkheimer and Adorno. This course will examine the evolution of modern aesthetics as well as current critical methodology. Conducted in English. Students may choose to read assigned texts in their original languages or in translation.

CTCP 71088: Critical Theory:  Foundations and Practices, Thursdays, 2:00pm-4:00pm, 3 credits, Prof. Vincent Crapanzano

The focus of this seminar will be on the relationship between various conceptions of and attitudes toward language and recent theories of interpretation and hermeneutical practices in the human sciences and literary study.  We will consider the effect of the stress on reference over other language functions – the pragmatic, poetic -- on notions of text, genre, and rhetoric. How does this stress configure meta-critical understanding? How does it foster the often-promiscuous play of divergent, at times analytically incompatible, approaches to interpretation so characteristic of contemporary theory? Readings will include works by Nietzsche, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, de Saussure, Lévi-Strauss and/or Gennette, Foucault, Michael Silverstein and his school, Bakhtin, Lacan and Deleuze.