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Spring 2019 Courses

Core Course:

CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
GC: Prof. Vincent Crapanzano, Wednesdays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, 3 credits.

Elective Courses:

ANTH 81700 Reading Capital, Volume 1
GC: Prof. Harvey, Tuesdays, 6:00 pm-8:00 pm

ART 86040 Art, Attention,Technology
GC: Prof. Claire Bishop, Tuesdays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm

ART 87300 Eco-Art History: Ecological Turn in the Visual Arts
GC: Prof. Katherine Manthorne, Wednesdays, 11:45 am-1:45 pm

ART 89000 Time and Timing: Photography’s Histories
GC: Prof. Maria Antonella Pelizzari, Thursdays, 11:45 am-1:45 pm
 
CL 80100 Adventures in Marxism
GC: Prof. Richard Wolin, Mondays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm, 2-4 credits. 

CL 89200 History of Literary Theory and Criticism II
GC: Prof. John Brenkman, Wednesdays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm, 4 credits.
 
ENGL 86800 Politics/Violence/Terrorism
GC: Prof. Siraj Ahmed, Tuesdays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm, 2-4 credits.

ENGL 80600 What is (a) body?
Prof. Kandice Chuh, Mondays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, 2-4 credits

HIST 72400 Adventures in Marxism
Prof. Richard Wolin, Mondays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm, 3 credits.

SPAN 87100 When Narrative and Image Interact: Intermedial Spaces in Latin American Writing and Photography
GC: Prof. Magdalena Perkowska, Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00 p.m.

SPAN 87100 Cuerpos letrados: Intelectuales, Política y performance
GC: Prof. Fernando Degiovanni, Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m.

SPAN 87200 Human Rights and Literature in the Americas
GC: Prof. Vanessa Perez Rosario, Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m.

MUS 86600 Seminar in Musicology: Critical Approaches to Race and Music
GC: Prof. Emily Wilbourne, Thursdays, 10 am-1 pm, 3 credits.

MUS 82500 History of Theory I: Aristoxenus to Zarlino
GC: Prof. Ruth Deford, Thursdays, 10 am-1 pm, 3 credits.

MUS 83200 Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Social Life of Technologies
GC: Prof. Eliot Bates, Tuesdays, 2 pm-5 pm, 3 credits.

MUS 84300 Seminar in Theory/Analysis: Schenker II
GC: Prof. William Rothstein, Wednesdays, 2 pm-5 pm, 3 credits.

MUS 84600 Seminar in Theory: Analysis of Post-Tonal Music II
GC: Joseph Straus, Thursdays, 2 pm-5 pm, 3 credits.

PHIL 77500 Liberalism and its Discontents
GC: Prof. Prinz, Tuesdays, 9:30 am-11:30 am, 4 credits.

PHIL 77600 Classics in the Philosophy of Art
GC: Profs. Carroll and Pappas, Tuesdays 11:45 am-1:45 pm, 4 credits.

PHIL 76100 The Philosophy of W.E.B. Du Bois
GC: Prof. Mills, Mondays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm, 4 credits.

PHIL 77700 Bernard Williams’ Ethical Philosophy
GC: Prof. Fricker, Tuesdays. 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, 4 credits.

PSC 80606 The Philosophy of W.E.B. Du Bois
GC: Prof. Mills, Mondays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm, 4 credits, Cross listed with PHIL 76100.

PSC 80602 Walter Benjamin
GC: Prof. Susan Buck-Morss, Mondays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm, 4 credits.
 
PSC 80601 Marxism
GC: Prof. Jack Jacobs, Wednesdays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, 4 credits.

PSC 80608 Political Interpretation: On Meaning and Power
GC: Prof. John Wallach, Wednesdays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm, 4 credits.

PSC 80300 Feminist Political Theory
GC: Prof. Alyson Cole, Thursdays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, 4 credits.
 
SOC 80000 Foucault on Power, Religion & Sexuality
GC: Prof. Lazreg, Mondays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm
 
SOC 83300 Self & Society: Feminist Theory and Psychosocial
GC: Prof. Chancer, Thursdays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm

THEA 70600 History of Theatrical Theory
GC: Prof. Jean Graham-Jones, Wednesdays, 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm.

THEA 85600 Studies in Theatre Aesthetics: Japanese Theatre and Performance: A Study in Theory and Practice
GC: Prof. Peter Eckersall, Tuesdays, 4:15 pm to 6:15 pm.

THEA 81500 Studies in Film Theory: Documenting the Self: Performance in Nonfiction Media
GC: Prof. Edward Miller, Wednesdays, 4:15 pm-8:15 pm

UED 71100 The Hidden Curriculum of Gender, Sexuality and Race in Schools
GC: Prof. Deckman, Tuesdays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm
 
UED 71100 Critical University Studies with a Special Emphasis on CUNY
GC: Prof. Brier, Wednesdays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm

Course Descriptions:
 
CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
GC: Prof. Vincent Crapanzano, Wednesdays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm
The focus of this seminar will be on the relationship between various conceptions of and attitudes toward language and recent theories of interpretation and hermeneutical practices in the human sciences and literary study.  We will consider the effect of the stress on reference over other language functions – the pragmatic, poetic – on notions of text, genre, and rhetoric. How does this stress configure meta-critical understanding? How does it foster the often promiscuous play of divergent, at times analytically incompatible, approaches to interpretation so characteristic of contemporary theory? Readings will include works by Nietzsche, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, de Saussure, Lévi-Strauss and/or Gennette, Foucault, Michael Silverstein and his school, Bakhtin, Lacan and Deleuze.   

ANTH 81700 Reading Capital, Volume 1
GC: Prof. Harvey, Tuesdays, 6:00 pm-8:00 pm

ART 86040 Art, Attention,Technology
GC: Prof. Claire Bishop, Tuesdays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm
 
This seminar examines theories of attention and spectatorship in relation to the three dominant visual technologies of the twentieth century—cinema, television, and the Internet—and their restructuring of human perception. There is now a substantial literature on attention that either draws on art history (Crary, Beller, Groys) or is pertinent to it (Kittler, Terranova, Hayles). Together they provide a foundation for examining the construction of audience attention in contemporary art, and for drawing out the differences between these technological innovations and their reformulation of our perceptual field.
 
Students will develop and present an original research paper on a topic related to the seminar. Auditors by permission.

ART 87300 Eco-Art History: Ecological Turn in the Visual Arts
GC: Prof. Katherine Manthorne, Wednesdays, 11:45 am-1:45 pm
 
This seminar explores the challenges and potential gains of utilizing eco-criticism as an emerging interpretive tool for art history. With its definition still in flux, it is broadly conceived as the study of culture and cultural production that link human beings with the natural world, and has taken on special urgency with the environmental crisis. Born of literature and cultural studies (with key figures Lawrence Buell, Greg Garrard and others), eco-criticism is inherently interdisciplinary and asks questions such as the following: How is nature represented in this artwork? Do men depict nature differently than women do? How has the concept of wilderness changed over time? In addition to race, class and gender, should place become a new critical category? Destruction too is part of this discourse. The recent exhibition Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950 (Hirshhorn, 2013/14) highlighted the efforts of conceptual artists to incorporate destruction as an aesthetic technique and comment on contemporary social phenomena including urban renewal and ecological devastation. Artworks from earlier periods such as Thomas Cole’s The Course of Empire (1836) are equally deserving of investigation. Initial seminar meetings combine theoretical readings with case studies of specific artists and artworks that embody social and environmental concerns. Students’ projects may focus on any related theme, historic period and region.

Seminar members are encouraged to view the exhibition Nature’s Nation: American Art & the Environment at the Princeton University Art Museum, Oct. 13, 2018- Jan. 6, 2019.  Accepts auditors with advanced permission
 
ART 89000 Time and Timing: Photography’s Histories
GC: Prof. Maria Antonella Pelizzari, Thursdays, 11:45 am-1:45 pm
 
The history of photography has often been discussed according to core thematics of indexicality and immediacy. Hence the photograph has been perceived as a mute testimony whose relationship with the flow of time is unconditional and irrevocable. The scope of this lecture course is to break away from the rigidity of these parameters that have marked much of the writing on photography. In an attempt to unpack the relationship between photography and time, we will aim to blur the disciplinary boundaries of photographic studies, considering modalities of vision across media. For example, how does Daguerre’s recording of ghost figures in a Parisian boulevard relate to the perception of panoramas and dioramas? How do photographic illustrated travel books and stereoviews transmit an experience of temporality that is aligned to early tourist packaging How do war photographs memorialize and narrate history differently or similarly to painted tableaux? Can we read traditional photo-essays in Life magazine against the narrative strips of comic books? What happens to the fixed temporality of the still image when the photograph is revisited and interrogated by a community according to both personal and political accounts? Has the continuous flow of images of the digital screen transformed the current perception of photography as stillness? What is the meaning of transience for contemporary photographers and media artists? These questions will be posed as we revision the most important theories about time and photography according to Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, Andre Bazin, Roland Barthes, Gilles Deleuze, together with most recent contributions in film studies, periodical studies, and literary studies. The course wants to open up the multiple definitions of time in photography, exploring the fluidity and malleability of this recording experience as we understand it today.
 
Auditors by permission only
 

CL 80100 Adventures in Marxism
GC: Prof. Richard Wolin, Mondays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm, 2-4 credits.
 
  "Je ne suis pas Marxiste!” - Karl Marx, cited by Engels, 1882
 
In his “Theses on Feuerbach” (1846) Marx, seeking to free himself from Hegel’s tutelage, famously declared that, “Heretofore, philosophers have only interpreted the world; however, the point is to change it!” At the time, little did Marx realize the immense historical influence his ideas and doctrines would have. For decades to come, Marx’s theories would inspire intellectuals and political activists in Europe, Latin America, and Asia – although, often in ways that would have undoubtedly astonished Marx himself. After all, the first “successful” communist revolution occurred not in a highly industrialized society, as Marx had prophesied, but instead in Tsarist Russia: a nation that had only recently freed its serfs and that was still largely agrarian. Although as late as 1956, Jean-Paul Sartre could still refer to Marxism optimistically as, “The unsurpassable philosophy of our time,” following World War II, with the rising tide of decolonization, the torch of World Revolution had clearly passed (in the words of Franz Fanon) to the “wretched of the earth” – to the denizens of the so-called “Third World.” To add to this litany of well-known paradoxes: in contemporary China, one of the few remaining communist nations, Marxism has paradoxically become the reigning ideology of a society that is unabashedly oriented toward exponential economic growth and conspicuous consumption. (Or, as Deng Xiaoping proclaimed during the early 1980s: “To get rich is glorious!”) Looking back from 1989 – the watershed year in which the Marxist regimes of Eastern Europe unraveled with breathtaking rapidity – intellectuals and pundits openly wondered whether the time had finally come to write Marxism’s epitaph. However, in light of the rise of neo-liberalism and the prodigious rise of social inequality, forecasts concerning Marxism’s demise would seem premature.
 
Our primary focus will be the legacy of Marxist thought. As such, we will begin by examining the way in which Marx’s youthful confrontation with Hegel prepared the ground for the development of his notion of “historical materialism.” But very quickly, under the tutelage of the later Engels and the Second International, this conception congealed into a dogmatic body of received truths, precipitating what some have called the “crisis of Marxism.” At the time, one of the main responses to Marxism-in-crisis was “Leninism”: the idea that, since the European proletariat seemed increasingly lethargic, a vanguard party was required in order to focus its attention on the long-term goal of world revolution.
 
Under the guise of a “return to Hegel,” and as an antidote to Soviet Marxism, the interwar period witnessed an efflorescence of philosophical Marxism. Among the highlights of this movement were Lukács’ History and Class Consciousness as well as the work of Walter Benjamin and the Frankfurt School – a renewal of Marxist thought that has been largely responsible for the postwar renaissance of “critical Marxism.” More recently, in books such as Revolution at the Gates, Slavoj Zizek has encouraged a “return to Lenin.” Similarly, the French Maoist, Alain Badiou, in part inspired by Sartre, has sought to resurrect Marx’s theory of the “subject.” Insisting that, as a critique of capitalism, Marxism has lost none of its historical relevance, Badiou claims that, by learning from its past defeats, Marxism can be resurrected.


CL 89200 History of Literary Theory and Criticism II
GC: Prof. John Brenkman, Wednesdays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm, 4 credits.
 
This course is a study of the thought about literature from the late 18th century to the present, with an emphasis on the evolution of modern aesthetics as well as current critical methods. The primary texts of aesthetic theory will be Kant’s Analytic of the Beautiful and Analytic of the Sublime in the Critique of Judgment, Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy, and Heidegger’s “The Origin of the Work of Art.” We will look at a range of critics who wrote major essays on Baudelaire in order to discuss the methodological and ideological antagonisms that animate modern criticism: Benjamin, Auerbach, Sartre, Poulet, Blanchot, Jakobson and Lévi-Strauss, de Man, Jauss, Kristeva. We will read reflections on tragedy and the tragic by Frye, Szondi, Girard, and Steiner. And instances of the philosopher as critic: Derrida on Mallarmé, Deleuze on Michel Tournier, Nussbaum on Henry James, and Cavell on Shakespeare.

ENGL 86800 Politics/Violence/Terrorism
GC: Prof. Siraj Ahmed, Tuesdays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm, 2-4 credits.
 
One of liberalism’s founding tenets is that the political sphere and physical violence are categorically distinct. From this tenet follows the understanding of non-state violence (in other words, ‘terrorism’) that pervades popular discourse today: it enters history either ab nihilo or from religion’s—particularly Islam’s—propensity for fanaticism.
 
In diametric opposition to this line of thought, postcolonial scholars—Talal Asad above all—have argued that terrorism was birthed by liberalism itself. From this perspective, contemporary non-state violence is scarcely distinguishable from the early modern civil and international conflict that originated the liberal order—the lawless violence at the roots of ‘liberty.’ Violence outside law was necessary not only to found this order but also, of course, to preserve it. Max Weber feared that if liberal states could no longer exploit other lands, they would import the illiberalism they practiced there back home. The economic and environmental crises of the last forty years—and the erosion of democracy and civil liberties that have accompanied these crises—might demonstrate how well-founded Weber’s fears were.
 
Liberalism turns on an internal contradiction: politics and violence are supposed, on one hand, to be mutually exclusive; yet states must not only monopolize violence but also, on the other hand, continuously exercise it. Liberalism conceals this contradiction by distinguishing between ‘legitimate’ and ‘illegitimate’ violence. The former term refers to any violence, however extreme, that preserves liberal societies, the latter to practically any act, movement, or event that threatens them. But if violence is justified only when it defends liberal societies, the war on terror serves an essential function: like the militarization of police forces, it implies that those societies remain in constant danger and hence have little choice but to use exceptional violence both within their borders and beyond.
 
This course will test such hypotheses by studying the continuity between colonial war; ‘low-intensity conflict’ after decolonization; and the war on terror over the last two decades. It hopes, as well, to provide a genealogy of terrorism much older than our own political era—as old, indeed, as the belief, common to the Abrahamic religions, that homicidal and even suicidal violence becomes sacred when it founds a new social dispensation, preserves collective identity, or reproduces one’s own way of life. Perhaps this genealogy will shed light on a pervasive, but nonetheless paradoxical, characteristic of academic as well as popular debate in the West: whereas the endangerment of certain lives here precipitates widespread horror, the mass killing of innocents elsewhere generates almost none.
 
Theoretical texts may include Asad, On Suicide Bombing; Mahmood Mamdani, Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: America, the Cold War, and the Roots of Terror; Faisal Devji, Landscapes of the Jihad: Militancy, Morality, Modernity; Hobbes, Leviathian; Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit; Freud, Beyond the Pleasure Principle; Walter Benjamin, ‘Critique of Violence’; Georges Bataille, The Tears of Eros; Hannah Arendt, On Violence; Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth; Malcolm X, ‘The Ballot or the Bullet’; René Girard, Violence and the Sacred; Pierre Clastres, The Archeology of Violence; and Jean Baudrillard, The Spirit of Terrorism.
 
Fictional texts may include Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent; W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz; J.M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians; Yasmina Khadra, The Swallows of Kabul; Mohsin Hamid, The Reluctant Fundamentalist; and Kamila Shamsie, Home Fire.
 
ENGL 80600 What is (a) body?
Prof. Kandice Chuh, Mondays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, 2-4 credits.
 
In this course, we will study a variety of ways in which "body" is made meaningful as a philosophical, political, social, cultural, and economic concept and entity.  How (by what mechanisms, through what procedures) does "body" signify humanness?  What are the limits of such signification?  How do such meanings index political economic and socio-cultural conditions?  Our readings will draw from fields and discourses that have taken up "body" as object and analytic, including performance studies, disability studies, transgender studies, Black and ethnic studies, and feminist and queer of color critique. 
 
Students taking the course for 2 credits should expect to post short responses on a bi-weekly basis to our course blog.  Students taking the course for 4 credits should expect to produce a seminar project (essay or equivalent) at the end of the semester, in addition to the bi-weekly blog posts.

HIST 72400 Adventures in Marxism
Prof. Richard Wolin, Mondays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm, 3 credits.
 
     In his “Theses on Feuerbach” (1846) Marx, seeking to free himself from Hegel’s tutelage, famously declared that, “Heretofore, philosophers have only interpreted the world; however, the point is to change it!” At the time, little did Marx realize the immense historical influence his ideas and doctrines would have. For decades to come, Marx’s theories would inspire intellectuals and political activists in Europe, Latin America, and Asia – although, often in ways that would have undoubtedly astonished Marx himself. After all, the first “successful” communist revolution occurred not in a highly industrialized society, as Marx had prophesied, but instead in Tsarist Russia: a nation that had only recently freed its serfs and that was still largely agrarian. Although as late as 1956, Jean-Paul Sartre could still refer to Marxism optimistically as, “The unsurpassable philosophy of our time,” following World War II, with the rising tide of decolonization, the torch of World Revolution had clearly passed (in the words of Franz Fanon) to the “wretched of the earth” – to the denizens of the so-called “Third World.” To add to this litany of well-known paradoxes: in contemporary China, one of the few remaining communist nations, Marxism has paradoxically become the reigning ideology of a society that is unabashedly oriented toward exponential economic growth and conspicuous consumption. (Or, as Deng Xiaoping proclaimed during the early 1980s: “To get rich is glorious!”) Looking back from 1989 – the watershed year in which the Marxist regimes of Eastern Europe unraveled with breathtaking rapidity – intellectuals and pundits openly wondered whether the time had finally come to write Marxism’s epitaph. However, in light of the rise of neo-liberalism and the prodigious rise of social inequality, forecasts concerning Marxism’s demise would seem premature.
     Our primary focus will be the legacy of Marxist thought. As such, we will begin by examining the way in which Marx’s youthful confrontation with Hegel prepared the ground for the development of his notion of “historical materialism.” But very quickly, under the tutelage of the later Engels and the Second International, this conception congealed into a dogmatic body of received truths, precipitating what some have called the “crisis of Marxism.” At the time, one of the main responses to Marxism-in-crisis was “Leninism”: the idea that, since the European proletariat seemed increasingly lethargic, a vanguard party was required in order to focus its attention on the long-term goal of world revolution.
     Under the guise of a “return to Hegel,” and as an antidote to Soviet Marxism, the interwar period witnessed an efflorescence of philosophical Marxism. Among the highlights of this movement were Lukács’ History and Class Consciousness as well as the work of Walter Benjamin and the Frankfurt School – a renewal of Marxist thought that has been largely responsible for the postwar renaissance of “critical Marxism.” More recently, in books such as Revolution at the Gates, Slavoj Zizek has encouraged a “return to Lenin.” Similarly, the French Maoist, Alain Badiou, in part inspired by Sartre, has sought to resurrect Marx’s theory of the “subject.” Insisting that, as a critique of capitalism, Marxism has lost none of its historical relevance, Badiou claims that, by learning from its past defeats, Marxism can be resurrected.

SPAN 87100 When Narrative and Image Interact: Intermedial Spaces in Latin American Writing and Photography
GC: Prof. Magdalena Perkowska, Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00 p.m.
 
Since the discovery of photography in 1839, and despite its long association with the mechanical reproduction of reality, the photographic image has increasingly assumed the role of participating in or indeed embodying literary projects. This course explores different modalities of interaction between photography and literary texts in contemporary Latin American writing, and between photography and narrativity in mixed works: fictional questioning of photographic practice, meaning, and ethics (Rodolfo Walsh, Julio Cortázar, Roberto Bolaño, Norah Lange), fiction with photographs (Eduardo Belgrano Rawson, Mario Bellatín), the photographic essay (Diamela Eltit, Eduardo Lalo), the photo-book and the photographic narrative (Susan Meiselas, Juan Manuel Echavarría), a photograph as (a source of) narrative (Marcelo Brodsky). We will examine these intermedial spaces in conjunction with theoretical readings on photography and literature in relation to affect, memory, ethics, and politics (Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, W.J.T. Mitchell, Jacques Rancière, Marianne Hirsch, Ariella Azoulay). The crossing of medial boundaries produces an imagetext  (Mitchell) or sentence-image (Rancière), a site of tension, slippage, transformation, displacement or interference, which impugns the notion of a single, fixed meaning; challenges representation, revealing its inescapable heterogeneity; reorganizes textual-visual visibilities and hierarchies;  and  posits questions about ethics of reader- and spectatorship.

SPAN 87100 Cuerpos letrados: Intelectuales, Política y performance
GC: Prof. Fernando Degiovanni, Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m.

Este curso se propone explorar la noción de intelectual más allá de su producción escrita. Trabajando aspectos usualmente marginalizados en el abordaje de su figura, como sus intervenciones en espacios públicos y masivos, nos planteamos la posibilidad de pensar la actividad del escritor como una práctica corporizada, dependiente de la voz y el gesto y formulada para un público que ve y oye. Esta historia del cuerpo letrado se puede rastrear en salones y cafés, tours de conferencias, discursos en asambleas masivas, entre otros espacios, y plantea interrogantes distintos a los que presupone su análisis como productor de textos destinados a ser leídos. Nociones tales como espectacularización, populismo y género serán claves en este curso. Entre los eventos que trabajaremos se encuentran la campaña presidencial de Macedonio Fernández, el tour latinoamericano de Manuel Ugarte, los banquetes de Norah Lange, y las performances de Ramón Gómez de la Serna y Omar Viñole. El seminario supone el abordaje de estos cuerpos letrados desde la teoría contemporánea como desde la investigación misma de los archivos en los cuales se documentaron sus prácticas. El curso dedicará especial atención a las intervenciones de Omar Viñole, figura sobre la cual convergen algunos nombres citados más arriba. Entendido como un seminario dentro del seminario, el estudio de la producción de Viñole (quien a mediados de la década de 1930 realizó numerosas intervenciones escandalosas en Buenos Aires y Montevideo acompañado por una vaca) permitirá explorar los desafíos específicos que plantea el análisis de la performance en circunstancias históricas y culturales atravesadas por la política de masas, la institucionalización letrada y la emergencia de nuevos debates sobre el cuerpo y la sexualidad.


SPAN 87200 Human Rights and Literature in the Americas
GC: Prof. Vanessa Perez Rosario, Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m.
 
Human Rights carry one set of popular meanings, that their protections will safeguard the human person from abuse, torture, pain, suffering, and other corporeal deprivation. Despite their immense promise, human rights discourses and norms remain fraught with paradox. Virtually since their inception, critics have decried the many contradictions that trouble human rights and the mechanisms of their internationalization and application. Although some of these paradoxes ensue from legal and other practical challenges of rights enforcement, the philosophical architecture of human rights norms and the definition of the human that organizes them are also composed of structural tensions and inconsistencies. Over the course of the semester, we will explore the convergence of human rights and theories of the human, violence, feminicide, dissent, censorship, vulnerability and precarity, and migration and mobility in theoretical and literary texts. We will think about the politics of reading, literature’s relationship to social justice, and the relationship between aesthetics and politics. Some theoretical readings will include works by Hannah Arendt, Homi Bhabha, Judith Butler, Edward Said, Elaine Scarry, Achille Mbembe, Lauren Berlant, and Giorgio Agamben, among others. We will read literary texts by Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx authors such as Los rendidos (2015) by José Carlos Agüeros, “Las orquídeas negras de Mariana Callejas”(1998) by Pedro Lemebel, Tell Me How it Ends (2017) by Valeria Luiselli, Fuera del juego (1968) and La mala memoria (1989) by Heberto Padilla, The Water Museum (2018) by Luis Alberto Urrea, and Under the Feet of Jesus (1995) by Helena Viramontes, among others.

MUS 86600 Seminar in Musicology: Critical Approaches to Race and Music
GC: Prof. Emily Wilbourne, Thursdays, 10 am-1 pm, 3 credits.

MUS 82500 History of Theory I: Aristoxenus to Zarlino
GC: Prof. Ruth Deford, Thursdays, 10 am-1 pm, 3 credits.

MUS 83200 Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Social Life of Technologies
GC: Prof. Eliot Bates, Tuesdays, 2 pm-5 pm, 3 credits.

MUS 84300 Seminar in Theory/Analysis: Schenker II
GC: Prof. William Rothstein, Wednesdays, 2 pm-5 pm, 3 credits.

MUS 84600 Seminar in Theory: Analysis of Post-Tonal Music II
GC: Joseph Straus, Thursdays, 2 pm-5 pm, 3 credits.

PHIL 77500 Liberalism and its Discontents
GC: Prof. Prinz, Tuesdays, 9:30 am-11:30 am, 4 credits.

PHIL 77600 Classics in the Philosophy of Art
GC: Profs. Carroll and Pappas, Tuesdays 11:45 am-1:45 pm, 4 credits.

This course comprises close readings of classics in the history of the philosophy of art in the Western tradition, beginning with Plato and extending to the early twentieth century. Some figures to be explored include Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, and others. There are no prerequisites for the course. The course requirement is a final paper.

PHIL 76100 The Philosophy of W.E.B. Du Bois
GC: Prof. Mills, Mondays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm, 4 credits.
 
Few American intellectuals of any race have surpassed the achievements of W.E.B Du Bois, who over a long (1868-1963) and remarkably productive activist and scholarly life made invaluable contributions across a wide variety of fields. Long recognized as black America’s towering thinker, he has only recently begun to get his due from the mainstream “white” academy, in disciplines ranging from sociology and history to literature and international relations theory (IR). In this course, we will look specifically at his pioneering role in helping to establish Africana Philosophy as a distinctive oppositional philosophical worldview in Western modernity.

PHIL 77700 Bernard Williams’ Ethical Philosophy
GC: Prof. Fricker, Tuesdays. 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, 4 credits.
 
Bernard Williams was one of the most influential voices in the moral philosophy of the past half-decade—a voice at once central and dissident. A staunch critic of the ‘morality system’ that he diagnosed in Kantianism, and a skeptic about the whole enterprise of ethical theory, he argued in favor of ways of doing ethics that would be a proper part of philosophy considered as a ‘humanistic discipline’.
 
We will focus on a number of interconnected themes in Williams’ thought, exploring both his critical project and also the positive, constructive philosophy that particularly characterized his later work. We will explore key themes in his meta-ethics (anti-objectivism, relativism, cognitivism, internal reasons), his moral psychology (shame, regret, agent-regret), his philosophical method (anti-theory, State of Nature genealogy), and most generally of all his conception of philosophy’s relation to history.
 
Classes will be mainly exercises in collective discussion prompted by short student presentations on set papers.
 
Some key indicative readings by Williams:
 
1972 Morality. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
1981 Moral Luck: Philosophical Papers 1973-1980. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
1985 Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy. London: Fontana Press.
1993 Shame and Necessity Berkeley: University of California Press.
1995 Making Sense of Humanity and Other Philosophical Papers 1982-1993 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
2002 Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press.
2006 Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline.. Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press.

PSC 80606 The Philosophy of W.E.B. Du Bois
GC: Prof. Mills, Mondays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm, 4 credits, Cross listed with PHIL 76100.
 
Few American intellectuals of any race have surpassed the achievements of W.E.B Du Bois, who over a long (1868-1963) and remarkably productive activist and scholarly life made invaluable contributions across a wide variety of fields. Long recognized as black America’s towering thinker, he has only recently begun to get his due from the mainstream “white” academy, in disciplines ranging from sociology and history to literature and international relations theory (IR). In this course, we will look specifically at his pioneering role in helping to establish Africana Philosophy as a distinctive oppositional philosophical worldview in Western modernity.

PSC 80602 Walter Benjamin
GC: Prof. Susan Buck-Morss, Mondays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm, 4 credits.
 
In-depth readings of a wide range of Walter Benjamin’s writings in historical-political context, from World War I and the Bolshevik Revolution, to World War II and the Vichy Regime. We will focus on philosophical method. What in his way of working escapes certain modern and post-modern dead-ends of theory? Excerpts from all five volumes of his Selected Works will be consulted.

PSC 80601 Marxism
GC: Prof. Jack Jacobs, Wednesdays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, 4 credits.
 
At the turn of the century, there were pundits who proclaimed the end of history – and of Marxism.  But in recent years, a specter has been haunting Europe (and other parts of the globe).  This course, which will be conducted as a seminar, will be devoted to discussing and critiquing the ideas of Karl Marx and some of the major thinkers who have been influenced by Marx.  We will begin by exploring Marx’s analysis of alienation, his understanding of history, and his notions of the state and of class.  We will turn next to discussing both Marxism in the era of the Second International, with particular attention to the Revisionist Debate between Eduard Bernstein and Rosa Luxemburg, and the political ideas of Vladimir Lenin.
 
I intend, in a somewhat later section of the course, to devote sustained attention to the development of Western Marxism, including the contributions of figures like Lukacs, Korsch, Horkheimer, Adorno, Benjamin, and Marcuse, many of whom attempted to explain why the revolution predicted by Marx had not (yet) taken place.  Finally: we will end this course by examining Marxist thought in the latter portions of the 20th century, and the first years of the 21st.
 
I expect that we will cover a work by Louis Althusser, and hope to also discuss relevant portions of the thought of Slavoj Zizek.    Throughout the semester, we will engage in a close examination of key texts, and will debate the extent to which the ideas we will discuss (and the controversies which they generated) can be explained by knowledge of the contexts in which they arose.  We will also explore the degree to which the ideas of the thinkers whose works we will read help to illuminate contemporary issues.

PSC 80608 Political Interpretation: On Meaning and Power
GC: Prof. John Wallach, Wednesdays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm, 4 credits.
 
The recent, radical partisanship that now promotes dysfunctional logjams in American politics calls into question the meaning and character of political knowledge. Concomitantly, it jeopardizes the value of public discourse. This problem is exacerbated by intellectual trends that have undermined the stability of natural or social scientific and moral knowledge – even knowledge itself – during the past generation, despite the often illuminating value of the arguments put forth in these trends.
 
A gap in political understanding has emerged from the waning interest in intuitive frames for girding political ethics – such as conservatisms (Strauss, etc.), liberalisms (Rawls, etc.), and Marxisms (the collapse of the dysfunctional Soviet Union
and Warsaw Pact), and the delegitimation of political theory itself that stems from Foucault’s power/knowledge perspective. The manipulation of publics by corporations, authoritarian populisms, and states, the tools for which have been enhanced by the internet (despite its value), and growing socio-economic inequality, extend and deepen the challenge.
 
Drawing on Dewey, Popper, Arendt, Skinner, Foucault, and Wolin for conceptualizing political knowledge, the seminar addresses political interpretation as a problem of meaning and power, a practice that is dedicated to exposing common worlds even as its practice changes them. This problem and its associated practices evidence a kind of indeterminate knowledge and worldly engagement that calls for our attention. Material from classic texts in political theory, philosophy, practices of interpretation (e.g., journalism, social media, blogs), spheres of socioeconomic
practice (e.g., health care, education), recent articles, and contemporary political/public discourse form bases of our interrogations and explorations.
 
This seminar satisfies the program’s “methodology” requirement. It will be useful for graduate students at any level and particularly those who have backgrounds in Western political thought and/or theories of social science. It is intended to aid political and democratic understanding as well as research projects (e.g., dissertations) – particularly in political theory but potentially for those mostly writing in other “sub-fields.” Writing requirements include a mid-term assignment and a final research paper, based on but not limited to course readings.
 
PSC 80300 Feminist Political Theory
GC: Prof. Alyson Cole, Thursdays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, 4 credits.
 
Feminist political theory attempts to reimagine political life by scrutinizing our understandings of sex, sexuality, and gender. In doing so it provides new perspectives on the meanings and limitations of salient political concepts such as rights, equality, identity, and agency, as well as the scope and content of politics itself. At the same time, feminism continually confronts questions regarding its own boundaries, agendas, and even its subjects (as Simone de Beauvoir asked, “what is a woman”?). How does the category of gender illuminate or eclipse power dynamics involving other categories of difference, such as those of culture, race, and class?
 
This course introduces students to central questions, approaches, and quandaries in contemporary feminist political thought. We begin by surveying the notable uptick in feminist activism, such as #MeToo and other forms of “hashtag feminism.” We then turn to investigate how traditional political theory has viewed women, and how feminists have theorized the political. Next, we attempt to think more comprehensively about what “sex” and “gender” are, and how they might be relevant to politics and to theorizing. The course ends with a range of texts addressing the intersection of gender with other forms of subjection, exploitation, and discrimination.
 
Students will be expected to write short weekly reflections on the readings, make one or more class presentations, and write a final paper. Texts will include work by Sara Ahmed, Linda Martin Alcoff, Gloria Anzaldúa, Wendy Brown, Judith Butler, Cathy Cohen, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Simone deBeauvoir, Mary Dietz, J. Jack Halberstam, Donna Haraway, Mary Hawkesworth, Bonnie Honig, Luce Irigaray, Catherine MacKinnon, Saba Mahmood, Kate Manne, Chandra Mohanty, Kelly Oliver, Carole Pateman, Adrienne Rich, Gayle Rubin, Gayatri Spivak, Iris Young, Linda Zerilli, among others.

SOC 80000 Foucault on Power, Religion & Sexuality
GC: Prof. Lazreg, Mondays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm
 
This intensive seminar focuses on a close reading of a small number of texts to understand what Foucault exactly wrote (and said) about power, its articulation with religion and sexuality, and its effects on the physical as well as social body.  Did Foucault elaborate a coherent theory of power that incorporates politics, religion and sexual identity? What is the explanatory potential of such a theory when compared with existing sociological conceptions of power?
To answer these questions, the seminar examines the nature, forms, technical methods and consequences of power in the various settings Foucault evoked, such as the state, the economy (capitalism), and revolutions.  The interface between sexuality and religion is studied through a number of key concepts, including “political spirituality,” “political life,” “liberalism,” “biopolitics” and “biopower;”  “governmentality,” “pastoral power,” “mysticism,”   “rupture” and “subjectification.”
 
The seminar further explores the relevance of Foucault’s thought to understanding some major contemporary issues, including the emergence of religion as a political force in developing countries; the state use of security as a tool of population control; the rise of neo-conservative leaders to power in Europe and the United States; and the backlash against feminism and gay rights.
 
Main texts:
Lectures at the Collège de France: “Society must be defended” (1976); “Security, Territory and Population,” (1977-78); Birth of biopolitics” (1978-79); “On the Government of the Living” (1979-80).
History of Sexuality and selections from Discipline and Punish
 
Students will be expected to engage in a sustained commitment to the readings and write a term paper on one of the theoretical issues covered in the seminar with a view to assessing its applicability to a current event.
 
Open to all interested students

SOC 83300 Self & Society: Feminist Theory and Psychosocial
GC: Prof. Chancer, Thursdays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm

THEA 70600 History of Theatrical Theory
GC: Prof. Jean Graham-Jones, Wednesdays, 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm.
 
This course will introduce students to theatrical theory as a research discipline and will examine theories that have influenced contemporary theatre and performance studies. We will begin with a general discussion of what constitutes theory and then proceed modularly to examine such key theatrical and performance concepts as representation, mimesis, dramaturgy, and audience response. A modular structure will allow us to follow and create ongoing dialogues about these concepts as they have evolved. The second objective of the course will be met through, again, a modular approach to the presentation and discussion of such influential critical and cultural theories as formalism and structuralism, semiotics, post-structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, and cultural theory, as well as other disciplinary approaches—coming from, for instance, anthropology, sociology, and psychology—that have transformed theatre and performance.

THEA 85600 Studies in Theatre Aesthetics: Japanese Theatre and Performance: A Study in Theory and Practice
GC: Prof. Peter Eckersall, Tuesdays, 4:15 pm to 6:15 pm.
 
This course will investigate theatre and performance in Japan.  It will introduce students to classical performance forms of noh, kyôgen, kabuki and bunraku and consider their aesthetic formation and social context in history as well as today.  It will further consider the ways that theatre has responded to modernization and explore in detail the development of contemporary theatre after the 1960s up to the present day.  We will consider Japan’s encounter with modernity in the early 20th century when aesthetic developments in Japanese theatre occurred in dialogue with European avant-gardism.  Radical theatre and performance during the 1960s will be discussed in relation to the rise of student protest and we will consider how contemporary theatre and performance in Japan coopts and resists experience of globalization. The course will study plays, documentation of performances and the historical and contemporary contexts for notable performance groups.  As such, a selection of plays will be examined alongside the work of theatre directors and performance makers including artists working to develop interdisciplinary and intercultural forms of expression. A particular focus of the course will be the study of Japanese Theatre through reading and discussion alongside an exposure to training regimes and practical exercises.  To this end, the class will include a workshop component that will introduce the training and practices of three contrasting forms, kyôgen, Suzuki method and butoh. Students are therefore invited to ‘learn through doing’ alongside their studies of the history of plays and performance. To accommodate this, the subject will proceed with alternating fortnightly blocks of seminar and workshop based study. No previous experience is required to participate in the training and students who are not able to undertake the workshop component will be asked to observe and document the process. Assessment will be in the form of a research paper on an aspect of Japanese theatre (60%) and a reflection and/or presentation on and/or response to the training component of the course (40%).
 
THEA 81500 Studies in Film Theory: Documenting the Self: Performance in Nonfiction Media
GC: Prof. Edward Miller, Wednesdays, 4:15 pm-8:15 pm
 
This seminar examines theories of nonfiction media and performances of the self. We begin by looking at depictions of the self in cinéma vérité and direct cinema in the 1960s. Filmmakers such as D.A. Pennebaker, the Maysles Brothers, and Fred Wiseman eliminated the artifice of voice-over, interviews, archival footage, and incidental music and made use of new lightweight equipment to create a new mode of documentary. They were especially drawn to capturing backstage views of rock stars (such as Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, David Bowie) as well as gaining access to interactions of ordinary people in extraordinary situations (such as in mental institutions, on the road selling bibles, working in political campaigns). In their attempt at recording life as it occurs, an unintended consequence emerged as an aspect of these films--theatricality. This theatricality arises not from the staging of situations per se, but in the freedom the filmmaker gives subjects to act out and to pretend as if the filmmaker was not there. Indeed this contradiction generates riveting performances of self as the presence of the camera motivates and frames conscious and unconscious techniques of playing a role.

UED 71100 The Hidden Curriculum of Gender, Sexuality and Race in Schools
GC: Prof. Deckman, Tuesdays, 6:30 pm-8:30 pm
 
This course explores the role of gender, sexuality, and race, and the intersection of these facets of identity, in contributing to young people’s schooling experiences, opportunities, and outcomes, and to the social context of schools more broadly.  In many ways, the course is about the “hidden curriculum” of racialized heteronormativity, or the subtle practices in schools that privilege particular heterosexual, gendered, and raced identities and ways of being.  In the course, we will engage with a variety of texts including theoretical works, qualitative and quantitative, empirical research, and applied, practical texts in analyzing how social differences are fundamentally entangled, and enmeshed with the making of identities. We will also engage the concept of the hidden curriculum and the lens of critical race theory as analytic tools for studying, understanding, and responding to how gender, sexuality, and race intersect with other social constructs with regard to schooling, and how these intersections contribute to shaping students’ identities. In particular, we will examine how these identities shape—and are shaped by—marginalized students’ experiences with inequity in schools. Lastly, we will apply our theoretical understandings to inquiry projects that will provide opportunities to ground the theoretical understandings that will be cultivated.
 
 UED 71100 Critical University Studies with a Special Emphasis on CUNY
GC: Prof. Brier, Wednesdays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm
 
This doctoral seminar on Critical University Studies (CUS), offered in the Urban Education program, will explore the role of higher education, especially public universities, at the intersection of issues of race, class, gender, culture, political economy, and politics. CUS is a relatively new field of interdisciplinary inquiry, growing out of theoretical developments in the fields of Cultural Studies and Critical Legal Studies and focused on the critical examination of the institutional structures, ideologies, histories, and changing curricular forms and methods of scholarly inquiry in public higher education in the United States and beyond. It analyzes the neoliberal attacks over the past three decades on public universities by politicians and business interests and the oppositional responses of college faculty, staff and undergraduate and graduate students and the larger communities they serve to the savage funding cuts and ideological and intellectual critiques faced by public higher education systems around the country. We will read deeply in recent and landmark literature on CUS and seminar members will conduct scholarly research and writing on a relevant CUS topic or area of interest. The seminar sessions will include presentations by several GC and outside presenters active in the CUS field. The seminar is open to all GC PhD students in social science and humanities disciplines, as well as MALS and other Master’s students interested in exploring the changing nature and role of higher education in contemporary society. The course will be taught by Professor Stephen Brier of the PhD program in Urban Education and a faculty member in the MALS and M.A. in Digital Humanities programs and the certificate programs in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and American Studies.