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Fall 2021 Courses

CTCP 71088: Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices, GC, Mondays, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM, Sorin Radu Cucu, 3 credits (Permission of Program Coordinator Required; Not open to 1st year students)

Do we really live in a post-truth world, the age when unreason and magical thinking seem to have returned with a vengeance?
 
This course addresses this question and the urgency it poses not only because critical theory has been accused as being complicit in the ‘attack’ against facts and science but primarily because we need to reflect critically on the often-confusing relation of reality to fiction in a variety of media and genres. Furthermore, this course will draw on the interdisciplinary approaches of both social sciences and the humanities to as whether digital algorithms are transforming our sense of shared reality and threaten the fragility of modern democratic institutions and practices. What does it means to think of reality as a complex network of discourses and practices rather than as a unitary concept? The underlying question of the interplay reality-irreality will be explored at the outset with reading together but against each other a few foundational figures: Husserl (on the crisis of the European sciences), Freud (on dream interpretation), Weber (on ‘ideal type’) and Arendt (on truth and lying).
 
We will examine a range of possibly irreconcilable theoretical approaches, as we re-read Kant’s “conflict of the faculties” in order to frame our conversations along the lines of distinct research approaches and terminologies rather than simply from the viewpoint of a conflict of interpretations. We will discuss how philosophical anthropology (Blumenberg), sociology of systems (Esposito, Luhmann), narratology/semiotics (Barthes, Genette, Patron), aesthetics (Eco, Krauss, Rancière), and media philosophy (Debray, Groys, Engel)  deal with the tension between universality and particularism, connect to everyday reality by a variety of rhetorical devices, and conceptually navigate aesthetic as well as religious experiences of reality.
 
Texts: Kant, The Conflict of the Faculties (Nebraska), Edmund Husserl, The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology (Northwestern), Hans Blumenberg, History, Metaphors, Fables: A Hans Blumenberg Reader (Cornell), Niklas Luhmann, Trust and Power (Polity)
 
Excerpts and essays by Elena Esposito, Roland Barthes, Sylvie Patron, Rosalind Krauss, Boris Groys,  others will be provided via Google Classroom.

Elective Courses

 

CL 79500: Approaches to Comparative Literature, GC, Wednesdays, from 4:15pm-6:15pm, Caroline Rupprecht, 4 credits

CL 89100: History of Literary Theory & Criticism I, GC, Wednesdays, 6:30pm-8:30pm, Monica Calabritto, 4 credits
 
CL 88500: Race, Writing, and Comparison, GC, Tuesdays, 2:00pm- 4:00pm, Sonali Perera, 2/4 credits
 
ENGL 76200.  Decolonizing the Novel in Theory and PracticePeter Hitchcock.  Wednesdays 4:15PM – 6:15PM.  2/4 Credits.
 
ENGL 76000.  Detonating Modernism.  Nico Israel.  Tuesdays 11:45AM – 1:45AM.  2/4 Credits.  
 
ENGL 80600.  Cheap Aesthetics.  Mary McGlynn.  Wednesdays 11:45AM – 1:45PM.  2/4 Credits.
 
ENGL 85500.  Black Feminisms and the Flesh. Amber Jamilla Musser.  Wednesdays 2:00PM – 4:00PM.  2/4 Credits.  
 
ENGL 80200.  Meaning and/as Moaning: Somatic Discourses and Aesthetic Affections.  Joan Richardson.  Thursdays 2:00PM – 4:00PM.  2/4 Credits
 
ENGL 80600.  Anthropocene Investigations.  Alexander Schultz.  Mondays 2:00PM – 4:00PM.  2/4 Credits.
 
FREN 79130 : Contemporary issues in Post-colonial Literatures and Films, Prof. Nathalie Etoké, Thursday, 4:15-6:15pm, Taught in French, Mode of instruction: on-line
 
SPAN 72000: Contemporary Latin American Cultural Theory, GC: Wednesday, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Prof. Degiovanni
 
SPAN 80100: Language in Late Capitalism, GC: Tuesday, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Prof. José del Valle
 
SPAN 87100: Visualidad, "Mujeres", y Archivo, GC: Thursday, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Prof. Donoso Macaya
 
MUS 83500: Seminar in Ethnomusicology: (Ethno)musicology and Social Theory Preferences, Wednesdays, 10 a.m-1 p.m, [Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission], ROOM 3389 Jane Sugarman, 3 Credits
 
MUS 83200: Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Social Life of Technologies, Mondays, 2 p.m.-5 p.m, [Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission], ROOM 3389, Eliot Bates, 3 Credits
 
PHIL 77000: Emotion, Mondays, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m., Prof. Prinz, Room TBA, 4 credits
 
PHIL 77500: Race, Racism, and Racial Justice, Mondays, 4:15 p.m. -6:15 p.m., Prof. Mills, Room TBA, 4 credits

PHIL 77700: Rethinking Democracy, Socialism, and Feminism, Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15, Prof. Gould, Room TBA, 4 credits
 
PHIL 77800: Aesthetics and Nature, Thursdays, 11:45 a.m-1:45 p.m., Prof. Shapshay, Room TBA, 4 credits
 
PSC 80609: Rethinking Democracy, Socialism and Feminism (Crosslist with PHIL 77700/WSCP 81000), Tuesdays, 4:15pm – 6:15pm, Gould (PT), Hybrid, 4 credits
 
PSC 80601: Global Political Theory, Wednesdays, 2:00pm – 4:00pm, Mehta (PT), 4 credits
 
PSC 80603: Theory as Method, Wednesdays, 4:15pm – 6:15pm, Buck-Morss (PT), 4 credits
 
PSC 70100: Ancient and Medieval Political Thought, Wednesdays, 6:30pm-8:30pm, Fontana (PT), 3 credits
 
SOC 72500: Urban Sociology, Thursdays, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m., Prof. Richard Ocejo, 3 credits
 
SOC 70100: Development of Sociological Theory (Theory I), Trimbur, Tuesdays, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m., 3 credits
 
SOC 74600: Capitalism and Crisis, Prof. Bologh, Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m., 3 credits
 
THEA 80300: Theatre, Performance and Time, Cross-listed with English, Art History and Critical Theory Certificate Program (exact course numbers will be posted shortly), Professor Maurya Wickstrom, Mondays, 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
 
UED 72100: Co-constructing Theory with Data, Thursdays, 4:15PM - 6:15PM, Collett
 
UED 71100: Black Visuality, Black Performance, Tuesdays, 2:00PM - 4:00PM, Musser & Gillespie
 
UED 72100: Critical Discourse Theory and Analysis, Thursdays, 4:15PM - 6:15PM, Daiute
 

Course Descriptions

 
CL 79500: Approaches to Comparative Literature, GC, Wednesdays, from 4:15pm-6:15pm, Caroline Rupprecht, 4 credits
 
This proseminar introduces students to the discipline and methods of Comparative Literature. We will read and discuss a range of essays from Cultural Studies, Gender Studies, and Postcolonial Studies. We will address basic questions, such as: How does one decide what should be the focus of a comparative inquiry? What is the relationship between a close reading and its theoretical frame? What is the role of context, as derived from the study of national literatures? How can historical approaches help or hinder comparisons aimed to be grounded in differentiation?
 
The class is taught online via zoom. It is not a lecture class, your participation will be required. We will use breakout rooms and the discussion board on Blackboard. Formal requirements include at least one presentation and several short papers, based on the readings on the syllabus. Registration is for PhD students only (MA students must ask for instructor’s permission).
 
Reading List:
Adorno, Theodor W. “Cultural Criticism and Society,” Prisms (1951)
Apter, Emily. Introduction, Against World Literature (2013)
Bachner, Andrea. “Found in Translation,” Shu-mei Shih, ed. Sinophone Studies (2013)
Baer, Elizabeth. Introduction, The Genocidal Gaze (2017)
Bhabha, Homi. “The Other Question,” The Location of Culture (1994)
Butler, Judith. “Violence, Mourning, Politics,” Precarious Lives (2004)
Chen, Mel. “Lead’s Racial Matters,” Animacies (2012)
Glissant, Edouard. “The Road to Rowan Oak,” Faulkner, Mississippi (1994)
Hayles, Katherine. ”Speculative Aesthetics,” Speculations V (2014)
Hartman, Saidiya, “So Many Dungeons,” Lose your Mother (2008)
Herling, Bradley. “Either a Hermeneutical or a Critical Consciousness,” Comparatist 34 (2010)
Heschel, Susannah. “German Jewish Scholarship on Islam,” New German Critique 117 (2012)
Huyssen, Andreas. “Rewritings and New Beginnings: W.G. Sebald,” Present Pasts (2004)
Jullien, Francois. “On Human Rights,” On the Universal (2017)
Latour, Bruno. “Agency at the time of the Anthropocene,” New Literary History 45 (2014)
Leys, Ruth. “The Turn to Affect: A Critique,” Critical Inquiry 37 (2011)
Liu, Lydia. “Shadows of Universalism,” Critical Inquiry 40:4 (2014)
Love, Heather. “Emotional Rescue,” Feeling Backward (2007)
Moten, Fred. “The Case of Blackness,” Criticism 50:2 (2008)
Pang-White, Ann. “Nature, Interthing Intersubjectivity, and the Environment,” Dao (2009)
Sedgwick, Eve. “Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading,” Touching Feeling (2002)
Silverman, Kaja. “Photography by Other Means,” Flesh of my Flesh (2009)
Tobin, Robert. “Thomas Mann’s Queer Schiller,” Lorey, Pews, eds. Queering the Canon (1998)
Wang, Ban. “Aesthetic Humanity and the Great World Community,” ACLA (2015).
 
CL 89100: History of Literary Theory & Criticism I, GC, Wednesdays, 6:30pm-8:30pm, Monica Calabritto, 4 credits
 
Course Description : TBA
 
CL 88500: Race, Writing, and Comparison, GC, Tuesdays, 2:00pm- 4:00pm, Sonali Perera, 2/4 credits
 
Course Description : TBA
 
ENGL 76200.  Decolonizing the Novel in Theory and Practice.  Peter Hitchcock.  Wednesdays 4:15PM – 6:15PM.  2/4 Credits.  
 
Cultural processes of decolonization are multiple and disjunct and vary considerably by region, history, and form.  Rather than simply provide a description of cultural decolonization at large, this course will focus on a specific genealogy of genre in order to address contemporary difficulties in decolonial critique.  Whether world literature has become the supercanon of literary study in the last twenty-five years is not without challenge or significant dissent, but the major question of genre for postcolonial and decolonial studies seems to have produced a notable consensus around one genre.  This genre is the novel.  Why is this so?
 
We know that the novel is deeply implicated in the rise of particular class interests and most certainly mediates Western projects of colonialism and imperialism.  Is it precisely because the novel is contaminated and coterminous with these histories that it is so radically contested from within by counter-narratives?  To the reader primed to refract the political conditions of decolonization, does the novel provide disciplinary and/or aesthetic solace from all the “real” work of anti-colonialism, anti-capitalism, and anti-racism within the methodological prerogatives of the social sciences, or does it reimagine the reality of these vital concerns as the very substance of its intervention?  Does the novel embrace a logic of knowledge, novelization, that makes it particularly adept at representing the frisson of genre in its own name?  To what extent does a sub-genre like the postcolonial novel betray the absorption of critique by the niche-marketing of yet one more monetized exception?  How does the novel in theory and practice inhibit or exceed the work of decolonization itself?  What would it mean to suggest that the novel is the last of colonialism as currently construed?  How could the withering of one possibly imply the deracination of the other?
 
With these questions in mind the course will attempt to plot three necessarily conflictual trajectories.  We will explore several examples of novels that contest the terms of conventional literary history by narrating a decolonial imperative.  We will then cast this genealogy against pertinent and disputed peculiarities of the novel in theory.  We will also consider what lessons the novel thus provides for interdisciplinary research on decolonization (In what language, in what region, in what history, in what environment?).  Do writers consider the nub of knowledge in the novel decolonial avant la lettre?  Where does praxis lie in the theory and practice of the novel?
 
In the main, this course encourages an interdisciplinary approach to literary decolonization that does not eschew the terms of literary hermeneutics themselves.  It can thus serve both as an introduction to postcolonial/decolonial studies and as a serious engagement with the limits and possibilities of the novel in that endeavor.  Readings will be drawn from but not limited to Spivak, Marx, Roy, Lukacs, Mukasonga, Bakhtin, Buluwayo, Bofane, Chamoiseau, Mukherjee, Said, Vera, Conde, Hamid, Lazarus, Brouillette, Ganguly, Gopal, Krishnan, Collins, and Ngugi.
 
 
ENGL 76000.  Detonating Modernism.  Nico Israel.  Tuesdays 11:45AM – 1:45AM.  2/4 Credits.  
 
The Nobel Prize in Literature was one of five prizes set up in the will of the Swede Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, a major supplier of armaments throughout the later 19th century, and, somewhat later, a generous supporter of the arts. Nobel’s 1895 will stipulated a literary prize to be given for a work “in an ideal direction” (“i idealisk rikning” in Swedish). What Nobel intended by “idealisk rikning” has long been open to question: did the word mean something akin to a residual romanticism, a universal humanism, or simply inventive literature (in the way the physics prize rewards “outstanding contributions in physics”)? Given the historical context of the earlier twentieth century—the persistence of massive war, colonialism and imperialism, and fascism (themselves undergirded by weaponry)—is literature to be perceived as an “ideal” antidote to violence (hence the connection to the Nobel peace prize), or itself a reflection of and response to that violence? 
 
This seminar explores the history of the prize and some examples of the writing of its early winners--Kipling, Tagore, Bergson, Hamsun, Yeats, and Pearl S. Buck—as well as losers--Rilke, Kafka, Proust, Mann, Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce, Pound, Pessoa, Musil, Williams, Moore, Hughes, Mandelstam, and Celan. We will occasionally dip into the Nobel’s archives to see how decisions were rationalized. (The rejection and then, later, acceptance of Samuel Beckett is particularly instructive). While thus acknowledging the micropolitics of prize committees, the seminar’s central focus will be on assessing the determination of literary “value,” a conception that is easy to deride but not possible to entirely explode. Critical reading to include works by Kant, Benjamin, Sartre, Arendt, Foucault, Agamben, Rancière, Guillory and others.
 
ENGL 80600.  Cheap Aesthetics.  Mary McGlynn.  Wednesdays 11:45AM – 1:45PM.  2/4 Credits.
 
Jason Moore and Raj Patel argue in A History of the World in 7 Cheap Things that “the modern world has been made through seven cheap things: nature, money, work, care, food, energy, and lives” (3).  Crossing this idea with Sianne Ngai’s framing of aesthetic categories, this class will consider cheap as an aesthetic category to explore the complicated relationship of capitalism, the commodity, and the object. We will consider the processes and practices by which we arrive at aesthetic judgments and categories (Kant, Adorno, Bourdieu, Ngai); the interrelation of the aesthetic with formal techniques, particularly in the representation of agency, powerlessness, and precarity, as well as in the activation of “minor” affects; and the way that the cheap in particular is a feature of contemporary literary and media production, from the publishing industry to greenwashing to viral spread.
 
ENGL 85500.  Black Feminisms and the Flesh. Amber Jamilla Musser.  Wednesdays 2:00PM – 4:00PM.  2/4 Credits.  
 
Black feminisms have persistently been entwined with theorizations of the flesh—that difficult to define materiality that is not quite the body. Flesh speaks to commodification, state-violence and histories of enslavement and settler-colonialism. Flesh has been used to reference the non-linguistic, pre-discursive, queer, and maternal. From this often-marginalized locus, black feminist theory has created many different possibilities. This course will look at several of different genealogies of fleshiness. First, focusing specifically on Audre Lorde, Saidiya Hartman, and Hortense Spillers before moving to the way these theories have radiated outward to inflect performance studies, literary theory, and aesthetics more broadly. Just as the specifics of enfleshment matter, we will investigate the differing contexts for these deployments of flesh to tell us how blackness, feminism, and black feminism are functioning in these different theoretical arenas. Potential readings from: Samantha Pinto’s Infamous Bodies, Shana Redmond’s Everything Man, Jayna Brown’s Black Utopias, Zakiyyah Iman Jackson’s Becoming Human, Alvin Henry’s Black Queer Flesh, C. Riley Snorton’s Black on Both Sides, Jillian Hernandez’s Aesthetics of Excess, Tiffany Lethobo King’s The Black Shoals, Uri McMillan’s Embodied Avatars, Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley’s Ezili’s Mirrors, Amber Jamilla Musser’s Sensual Excess, and Jessica Marie Johnson’s Wicked Flesh.
 
ENGL 80200.  Meaning and/as Moaning: Somatic Discourses and Aesthetic Affections.  Joan Richardson.  Thursdays 2:00PM – 4:00PM.  2/4 Credits.  
 
Key questions and themes of this seminar will amplify the common etymological root of “meaning” and “moaning” to explore when and how the mind-body split emerged in language and how writers have attempted to repair or overcome it. As 18th-century minister Jonathan Edwards—considered by many to be both America’s first philosopher and first psychologist—observed, “The mind feels when it thinks.” We will sample pages/texts from a diverse array of voices spanning various periods and cultures to search out how what Stanley Cavell beautifully termed “passionate utterance” is made; a partial list might include, i.e., Heraclitus, Augustine, Tu Fu, Ibn ‘Arabi, Emerson, Dickinson, William James, W. E. B. DuBois, Wallace Stevens, Zora Neale Hurston. The samplings will be considered against a background of readings in current cognitive science, affect theory and neuroaesthetics. Active participation in discussion and a term paper or project (for those registered for 4 credits) will be required; for first-year students the project could be a version of a component of the First “Portfolio” Examination.
 
ENGL 80600.  Anthropocene Investigations.  Alexander Schultz.  Mondays 2:00PM – 4:00PM.  2/4 Credits. 
 
The term “Anthropocene,” first introduced by the chemist and Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen and the biologist Eugene Stoermer twenty years ago, has by now become the most widely used designation for the current period of global, human-induced environmental catastrophe in both scholarly and public discourse. The appropriateness of the term (though of course not the global crisis it seeks to highlight) has, however, been subject to vigorous critique in the social sciences and the humanities, mainly due to its problematic naturalization of the human and its erasure of crucial questions of human difference and responsibility. From the perspective of the humanities in particular, a return to a species narrative, with an undifferentiated anthropos writ large as the protagonist, can seem to erase in one fell swoop decades of scholarly work in critique of essentialist conceptions of “the human.” A range of alternatives, from Capitalocene to Chtulucene, have been proposed in an effort to alter the narrative parameters in order to call anthropocene grand narratives into question.
 
At the same time, a growing number of scholars in the humanities take seriously the challenge of the “Anthropocene” to rethink what viable narratives about and representations of the relationships of human beings to their environments might look like at a moment of global crisis where human and natural history can no longer be thought of as disentangleable. Such attempts include a newly framed engagement with literature and art more broadly as modes of representation that might allow us to bring the contemporary human predicament into view in different ways than scientific data and public policy debates.
 
To address these overlapping discussions, this seminar will offer a two-fold investigation. On the one hand, we will attempt to take stock of the disciplinary discussion surrounding the “Anthropocene” and examine a range of critical perspectives and proposed alternatives in naming and timeline. At the same time, we will also turn our attention to emergent transdisciplinary approaches in the environmental humanities, as well as to the creative practice in literature and the arts, in order to investigate what a poetics for the “Anthropocene” might look like. Our theoretical interlocutors will include Bruno Latour, Donna Haraway, Kathryn Yussof, and T.J. Demos, among others.
 
Portions of this course can be used to fulfill the requirements for the first-year portfolio exam.
 
Course requirements: 3 short position papers; 15-minute conference presentation at the in-class, end-of-semester course conference; final 15-20 page research paper.
 
Course readings:
 
Latour, Bruno. Facing Gaia. Eight Lectures on the New Climatic Regime. Cambridge: Polity, 2017. ISBN: 978-0-7456-8434-5
Yussof, Kathryn. A Billion Black Anthropocenes or None. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota Press, 2018. ISBN: 978-1-5179-0753-2, available for free online: https://manifold.umn.edu/projects/a-billion-black-anthropocenes-or-none
Demos, T.J. Against the Anthropocene. Visual Culture and Environment Today. Berlin: Sternberg Press, 2017. ISBN: 978-3-95679-210-6
Bilodeau, Chantal. Sila. Vancouver: Talon Books, 2015. ISBN: 978-0-88922-956-3
Bilodeau, Chantal. Forward. Vancouver: Talon Books, 2017. ISBN: 978-1-77201-183-8
Kimmerer, Robin Wall. Braiding Sweetgrass. Minneapolis: Milkweed, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-57131-356-0
 
Additional primary and secondary readings will be available via the course e-reserve page.
 
FREN 79130 : Contemporary issues in Post-colonial Literatures and Films, Prof. Nathalie Etoké, Thursday, 4:15-6:15pm, Taught in French, Mode of instruction: on-line
 
2010 marked the 50 years of ‘African independences’. This course will explore various dimensions of the francophone post-colonial experience in Sub-Saharan Africa.  We will reflect on the legacy of colonialism and current challenges facing former French colonies. The focus will be on the failure of the postcolonial state, violence, memory, gender, sexuality and immigration. We will also address current debates in Francophone Sub-Saharan African literary criticism.
 
SPAN 72000: Contemporary Latin American Cultural Theory, GC: Wednesday, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Prof. Degiovanni
 
This seminar will address key theoretical and critical texts that have defined the field of Latin American cultural studies in recent decades. By analyzing the politics of academic knowledge in the global theoretical market, our goal will be to reconstruct both the genealogical lines as well as the epistemological frameworks that have played a crucial role in the region’s current intellectual production. The first part of the course will focus on a corpus of canonical authors that, since the 1980s, contributed to the definition of notions of modernity, coloniality, globalization and the role of the popular in Latin America. The second part will explore paradigms that have emerged over the last decade, in particular regarding notions of gender and sexuality, human and animal rights, cosmopolitism, as well as ecocultural criticism and theories of the sensible. In this final section, the course will function both as a seminar and as an academic writing workshop, and will focus on the theoretical interests of the students. The objective here will be to help them position their own research interests within contemporary theoretical currents.
 
 
SPAN 80100: Language in Late Capitalism, GC: Tuesday, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Prof. José del Valle
 
In this seminar, we will examine language´s involvement in the development of late capitalism by using Monica Heller and Alexandre Duchêne’s (2007 and 2012) proposal to analyze the deployment of linguistic ideologies around the 'pride' and 'profit' tropes, Marnie Holborow´s (2015) overview of language´s relevance to neoliberalism, Thomas Ricento´s (2015) study of the political economy of language policy, and Monica Heller and Bonnie McElhinny´s (2017) approach to language from a political economy perspective. These studies will be placed in dialectic relation with each other and with alternative sociological and political views of language (e.g. Blommaert, Crystal or Phillipson) and they will be tested through the analysis of specific sociolinguistic spaces. These will include, but not be limited to, normalization policies on behalf of minority languages in Europe, language revitalization processes in the Americas, and the politics of language and ethnic and national identity in the United States. The core readings will be extracted mainly from: David Crystal, English as a Global language (2003); Monica Heller and Alexandre Duchêne, Discourses of Endangerment (2007) and Language in Late capitalism (2012); Norma Mendoza-Denton, Homegirls: Language and Cultural Practices among Latina Youth Gangs (2008); Jan Blommaert, The Sociolinguistics of Globalization (2010); Robert Phillipson, Linguistic Imperialism Continued (2010); Jacqueline Urla, Reclaiming Basque: Language, Nation, and Cultural Activism (2012) ; H. Sami Alim and Geneva Smitherman, Articulate While Black: Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S. (2012); Angela Reyes, Language, Identity, and Stereotype among Southeast Asian American Youth (2012); Marnie Holborow, Language and Neoliberalism (2015); Serafín Coronel-Molina, Language Ideology, Policy and Planning in Peru (2015); Thomas Ricento (2015) Language Policy and Political Economy: English in a Global Context; Kathryn A. Woolard, Singular and Plural: Ideologies of Linguistic Authority in 21st Century Catalonia (2016); Monica Heller and Bonnie McElnihhy, Language, Capitalism, Colonialism (2017). [The seminar will be conducted in various forms of English]
 
SPAN 87100: Visualidad, "Mujeres", y Archivo, GC: Thursday, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Prof. Donoso Macaya
 
What is rendered (in)visible when “women” are rescued from/in the archive? What does the category “women” name and erase? What does the gesture of “rescue” reproduce? Is it possible to articulate forms of feminist criticism that do not attend to the politics of identity and representation, to develop methodologies that do not reinforce patriarchal paradigms and discursive tropes? These questions are the starting point for this course (taught in Spanish), which proposes to critically reflect on the notions of “visuality,” “women,” and “archive,” as well as to consider theoretical and methodological problems that emerge when addressing these notions together. The reflection will be guided both by academic studies that intersect archive, historiography, visuality and a critical perspective of gender—Licia Fiol-Matta, Donna Haraway, Saidiya Hartman, Andrea Noble, Ann Stoler, among others—as well as by literary essays and theoretical and activists texts by South American (trans)feminist authors—Panchiba Bustos, Alejandra Castillo, Jorge Díaz, Val Flores, Verónica Gago, Olga Grau, Marlene Guayar, Julieta Kirkwood, Lina Meruane, Julieta Paredes, Nelly Richard, and Alia Trabucco Zerán, among others.
 
MUS 83500: Seminar in Ethnomusicology: (Ethno)musicology and Social Theory Preferences, Wednesdays, 10 a.m-1 p.m, [Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission], ROOM 3389 Jane Sugarman, 3 Credits
 
MUS 83200: Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Social Life of Technologies, Mondays, 2 p.m.-5 p.m, [Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission], ROOM 3389, Eliot Bates, 3 Credits
 
PHIL 77000: Emotion, Mondays, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m., Prof. Prinz, Room TBA, 4 credits
 
This seminar investigates the nature and the roles of emotions from an interdisciplinary perspective.  We will begin by investigating competing theories of emotions, and related.  Are emotions embodied?  Do they require cognition?  Are they ways of seeing or ways of acting?
 
We will also look at where emotions come from.  Are they innate?  Are they shaped by culture?  Do they change over historical time?  In addition, we will look at debates about emotions and rationality.  Are emotions rational, irrational, or arational?  What makes an emotion inappropriate?  Why do emotions linger?
 
There are related questions about emotions in psychiatry.  When is an emotion unhealthy?  When are they excessive or deficient?  Along with these general questions, we will consider specific emotions, such as anger and disgust, as well as epistemic emotions, such as boredom and interest.  This will raise questions about the role of emotions in various domains such as ethics and aesthetics.  Though philosophical readings will outnumber the rest, we will also read perspectives from several other fields including, psychology, neuroscience, sociology, and history.
 
PHIL 77500: Race, Racism, and Racial Justice, Mondays, 4:15 p.m. -6:15 p.m., Prof. Mills, Room TBA, 4 credits
 
This course will look at the interlinked themes of race, racism, and racial justice. The timing is particularly appropriate given the summer of 2020’s massive national and global protests sparked by George Floyd’s killing by the Minneapolis police, and the new Biden Administration’s declared commitment to making the achievement of racial equity a central policy. We will consider such issues as the history of racism, the “metaphysics” of race, and competing analyses of racism, before turning to the central theme of institutional and structural racial injustice. How should they be understood, and what normative framework is best suited for conceptualizing and remedying them?
 
Recent work by political theorists such as Iris Marion Young, Tommie Shelby, Andrew Valls, Charles Mills, Christopher Lebron, Shatema Threadcraft, and others will be canvassed, but we will also take a look at some popular/grassroots framing of the issues. If there is time, we may also glance at some of the legal literature, and how “equal protection” has historically been interpreted.
 
PHIL 77700: Rethinking Democracy, Socialism, and Feminism, Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15, Prof. Gould, Room TBA, 4 credits
 
This course will explore the interconnections that can be discerned within and among democratic, socialist, and feminist theories and will analyze some of the central questions that arise at their intersection. Some of the liveliest questions in contemporary political philosophy concern whether it is possible to forge a unified approach that pulls together core elements of these three diverse traditions of thought which, together with anti-racist and postcolonial perspectives, could serve to guide fundamental social and political transformations.
 
The course will investigate these potentials by first considering some readings from democratic theory that incline in a socialist direction (J. S. Mill, Dewey, Macpherson, Pateman, Gould, Christiano), and then some classical socialist theories that are explicitly or implicitly democratic (e.g., Marx, Owen, Fourier, Saint-Simone, Louise Michel, Lucy Parsons, E. Bernstein, Emma Goldman, Volarine de Cleyre, G.D.H. Cole), followed by feminist approaches to democracy that are compatible with socialism, e.g., Tronto's "Caring Democracy," or that extend the account of domination and exploitation to encompass the phenomenon of group oppression (Iris Young, Nancy Fraser, Ann Ferguson).
 
The course will go on to take up some key conceptual issues for a possible democratic socialism, delineated with all three theories in view. These problems will include the role of the market and democratic self-management at work (G. A. Cohen, Gould, Schweickart, Carens, Vrousalis); varieties of inclusive political participation, deliberation, and representation (Mansbridge, J. Cohen, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor); and models of mutual aid and cooperative care (e.g., Kropotkin, Selma James, S. Federici, Incite! Women of Color against Violence, Dean Spade). Attention will be paid to areas of substantive (dis)agreement in regard to new institutional and social forms, and also to the differences in methodologies and emphases that the various theoretical perspectives would bring to the development of a more unified approach to social and political change.
 
PHIL 77800: Aesthetics and Nature, Thursdays, 11:45 a.m-1:45 p.m., Prof. Shapshay, Room TBA, 4 credits
 
“Aesthetics and Nature” takes up two main clusters of questions: First, what constitutes appropriate aesthetic appreciation of nature? Is it importantly different from appropriate art appreciation?  Second, to what extent are aesthetic values important for environmentalism? That is, are aesthetic values too weak, too ‘scenery-obsessed,’ too elitist, or generally, too anthropocentric to outweigh human-welfare based reasons to exploit nature as a resource? Given the alarming effects and acceleration of anthropogenic climate change, these guiding questions feel especially urgent today.
 
To investigate these questions, we’ll start with some historical treatments of the three main aesthetic categories to emerge in 18th c. European aesthetics (predominantly but not exclusively with respect to nature): Edmund Burke’s A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful (1757), Immanuel Kant’s The Critique of the Power of Judgement (1790), and Uvedale Price’s “Essay on the Picturesque as Compared with the Sublime and Beautiful” (1794). Then we’ll consider the increasing turn toward aesthetics as philosophy of art in the 19th c. (due in large part to Hegel), before turning to the (re)birth of environmental aesthetics around the social movements of the 1970s up to the present.
 
Contemporary readings will be grouped thematically and will include:
 
Allen Carlson. 2009. Nature and Landscape: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetics Columbia University Press.
Noël Carroll, 1993. “On Being Moved by Nature: Between Religion and Natural History” in Salim Kemal and Ivan Gaskell eds. Landscape, Natural Beauty and the Arts. Cambridge UP, 244-266.
William Cronon, 1995. “The Trouble with Wilderness” in William Cronon, ed., Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature, New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 69-90.
Yuriko Saito, 1998. “Appreciating Nature on Its Own Terms” Environmental Ethics 20: 135-149.
Andrew Brennan, 1984. “The Moral Standing of Natural Objects.” Environmental Ethics 6: 35–56.
Janna Thompson, 1995. “Aesthetics and the Value of Nature.” Environmental Ethics 17: 291–305.
Holmes Rolston, III. 2002. “From Beauty to Duty: Aesthetics of Nature and Environmental Ethics.” In Environment and the Arts: Perspective on Environmental Aesthetics, edited by Arnold Berleant, 127–141. Aldershot: Ashgate.
Elliott Sober. 1986. “Philosophical Problems for Environmentalism.” In The Preservation of Species, edited by Bryan G. Norton, 173–194. Princeton University Press.
Robert D. Bullard. 1994. "Environmental Blackmail in Minority Communities." In Reflecting on Nature: Readings in Environmental Philosophy, edited by Lori Gruen and Dale Jamieson, 132–141. Oxford University Press.
Ned Hettinger, 2005. “Allen Carlson’s Environmental Aesthetics and the Protection of the Environment.” Environmental Ethics 27: 57–76.
———. 2008. “Objectivity in Environmental Aesthetics and Environmental Protection.” In Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty, edited by Allen Carlson and Sheila Lintott, 413–437. Columbia University Press.
Glenn Parsons, 2018. “Nature Aesthetics and the Respect Argument” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism special issue “The Good, the Beautiful, the Green” eds. Sandra Shapshay & Levi Tenen.
Robert Stecker. 2012. “Epistemic Norms, Moral Norms, and Nature Appreciation.” Environmental Ethics 34: 247–264.
Nick Zangwill. 2000. “In Defence of Moderate Aesthetic Formalism.” Philosophical Quarterly 50: 476–493.
Jennifer Welchman. 2018 “Aesthetics of Nature, Constitutive Goods, and Environmental Conservation” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism special issue “The Good, the Beautiful, the Green” eds. Sandra Shapshay & Levi Tenen.
Sandra Shapshay. 2013. “Contemporary Environmental Aesthetics and the Neglect of the Sublime” British Journal of Aesthetics.
Katie McShane. 2018. “The Role of Awe in Environmental Ethics” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism special issue “The Good, the Beautiful, the Green” eds. Sandra Shapshay & Levi Tenen.
 
PSC 80609: Rethinking Democracy, Socialism and Feminism (Crosslist with PHIL 77700/WSCP 81000), Tuesdays, 4:15pm – 6:15pm, Gould (PT), Hybrid, 4 credits
 
Course Description: TBA.
 
PSC 80601: Global Political Theory, Wednesdays, 2:00pm – 4:00pm, Mehta (PT), 4 credits
 
Course Description: TBA.
 
PSC 80603: Theory as Method, Wednesdays, 4:15pm – 6:15pm, Buck-Morss (PT), 4 credits
 
Course Description: TBA.
 
PSC 70100: Ancient and Medieval Political Thought, Wednesdays, 6:30pm-8:30pm, Fontana (PT), 3 credits
 
Course Description: TBA.
 
SOC 72500: Urban Sociology, Thursdays, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m., Prof. Richard Ocejo, 3 credits
 
This course will introduce students to a variety of sociological theories and approaches for studying cities and urban life. The aim is to cover as much of the canon as possible and expose students to current explanations and debates. We will start with early theorizing and empirical research on the relationship between modernity and urbanism and proceed to discuss some of today’s most important discourses and studies for understanding space, inequality, segregation, and growth in an era of extreme globalization. The course will look at such topics as urban political economy, race and space, racial capitalism, gentrification, cities and climate change, culture and placemaking, housing, and global urban sociology. It will also consider sociology’s contribution to the larger field of urban studies.
Finally, since City & Community, the official journal of the Community and Urban Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association, is now based at the Graduate Center, it will serve as key source for many of our readings and discussions. Students will also gain meaningful insight into the backstage workings of an academic journal, learn how to frame their work as an article, and engage in some journal-related activities. 
 
 
SOC 70100: Development of Sociological Theory (Theory I), Prof. Trimbur, Tuesdays, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m., 3 credits
 
Course Description: TBA.
 
SOC 74600: Capitalism and Crisis, Prof. Bologh, Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m., 3 credits
 
Course Description: TBA.
 
THEA 80300: Theatre, Performance and Time, Cross-listed with English, Art History and Critical Theory Certificate Program (exact course numbers will be posted shortly), Professor Maurya Wickstrom, Mondays, 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
 
This course is an exploration of contemporary thought on temporality, with a particular focus on theatre, performance, and theatre scholarship as important mediums for new temporal or alternative experience and thought. The class takes as a central point the problematic of linearity and modernist and teleological narratives of progress, with Walter Benjamin as a central provocation. We will also explore the relation between history and time, dominant modes of temporality in neoliberalism, and key philosophical interventions in time such as those by Giorgio Agamben. Importantly, the class will also consider our recent intense experience of Covid-time and Black uprising. Zoom productions like Richard Nelson’s new Apple family plays, or Forced Entertainment’s End Meeting for All, were early explorations of this pandemic temporality. The time of Black uprising has foregrounded how much Black people have generated, and lived in, temporalities alternative to Euro/North American linear capitalist times. This is articulated in an abundance of Black scholarship and practice on time that expresses the fullness of what the uprisings offer to living differently. Further, this time is marked by the publication of Race and Performance After Repetition (2020). The volume emerged from an ASTR José Esteban Muñoz Targeted Research Working Session and is the theme of the rescheduled ASTR conference in Fall 2021. It will be a central organizing structure for the course. The volume, grounded in Muñoz’s thought, directs itself to moving elsewhere from the fascination with the temporal signature of repetition that has often been dominate among performance scholars thinking about time. In so doing, it opens up especially into evocations of, for instance, Black futurity, afterlife, the wake etc. as significant and active experiential concepts for a livable life for those who have battled “racial time” for centuries
 
Performance work might include, for instance, An Octoroon (Branden Jacobs-Jenkins), The B-Side (Eric Berryman/Wooster Group), We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly known as South West Africa (abbreviated title - Jackie Sibblies Drury) in conjunction with The Refusal of Time and The Head and the Load (William Kentridge), Moneymaker (the Covid-time live durational performance by Holly Bass performed in the window of Live Arts), Architecting (The TEAM), and performances by Cassils, Andrew Schneider and M. Lamar. Theorists may include, in addition to those included in Race, Repetition and Performance, Walter Benjamin, Giorgio Agamben, W.E.B. Dubois, Fred Moten, Alexander Weheliye, Bruno Latour, Gary Wilder, Lisa Lowe, Saidiya V. Hartman, Alain Badiou, Giulia Palladini, Nicholas Ridout, Christina Sharpe, and Sarah Jane Cervenak.
 
Course Requirements: one short presentation, one short paper (5-8 pages), and one long paper (10-15 pages).
 
NOTE: All THEA courses are listed as hybrid given ongoing uncertainties about COVID-19; there may be unexpected changes in instructional mode.
 
 
UED 72100: Co-constructing Theory with Data, Thursdays, 4:15PM - 6:15PM, Collett
 
This course is designed to help students understand the intersection of theoretical frameworks and the process of data analysis.  It is designed to support second and third students to use theoretical frameworks dominant in education [e.g. sociocultural theory (Vygotsky, 1978); positioning theory (Harré & van Langenhove, 1999); Dialogism (Bahktin, 1981)] to create data analysis tools of layered coding (Saldana, 2013) to elucidate important findings across educational settings.  Students will analyze and deconstruct different theoretical approaches to understand how to create methodological tools to identify novel findings and conclusions.
 
UED 71100: Black Visuality, Black Performance, Tuesdays, 2:00PM - 4:00PM, Musser & Gillespie
 
The class will be an interdisciplinary consideration of blackness and the art of black cultural production with attention to framing art as an enactment of black visual and expressive culture. We will focus on the aesthetic, political, historiographic, and cultural instantiations of the idea of race as discourse. The narrative of the class is structured around various epistemological and aesthetic themes/tendencies that inform black visuality and performativity in the arts (e.g. film, television, literature, music, new media, photography, dance, painting, installation art).  Students will be required to complete and present their own projects on black visuality/performance. Course readings may include: Tina Campt’s Listening to Images, Uri McMillan’s Embodied Avatars: Genealogies of Black Feminist Art and Performance, Emily Lordi’s The Meaning of Soul: Black Music and Resilience Since the 1960s, Huey Copeland’s Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America, Amber J. Musser’s Sensual Excess: Queer Femininity and Brown Jouissance, and Michael Boyce Gillespie’s Film Blackness: American Cinema and the Idea of Black Film.
 
UED 72100: Critical Discourse Theory and Analysis, Thursdays, 4:15PM - 6:15PM, Daiute
 
This course focuses on expression as activity and subjectivity in processes of social change and learning. Expressive media, like personal narratives, policies, laws, images, interviews, and curricula occur in tension, synergy, and transformation. We review research focused on how individuals, cultural groups, and institutions use those and other discourse genres to share/impose/resist/innovate ways of knowing and living, especially at moments of major change such as in social movements and displacements. Drawing on social sciences and humanities, we consider research designs within naturally occurring practices and craft detailed analytic strategies to learn about interactions among and within diverse participants, privileging especially the voices of people who have been marginalized, discriminated against, and excluded in other ways, while also shining a light on those with resources and power. Topics organizing our work include literary readings of everyday interactions, the language of microaggressions, silences in policy reports, and multiple voices in interviews. The course features discourse analysis workshops, with previous data sets and as applied to students’ projects. We also work with computer software such as Atlas ti, Nvivo, and others). Students are invited to bring their own projects and data to the course.  No prerequisite.