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Fall 2018 Courses

ANTH 70300  History of Anthropological Theory
Profs. Dana Davis and Donald Robotham Wednesdays 10:45am-1:45pm   

ANTH 71700  Theoretical Approaches to Nature & Environment
Prof. Melissa Checker Mondays 2:00pm-4:00pm

ANTH 80900  Existentialism/Phenomenology
Prof. Vincent Crapanzano Wednesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm

ANTH 81300  Thinking About the State Through Foucault and Beyond
Prof. Talal Asad Mondays 11:45am-1:45pm

ANTH 81700  Anti-Capitalist Thought and Action
Profs. David Harvey and Jeff Maskovsky Wednesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

ANTH 81900  Heterodox Marxism 
Prof. Gary Wilder Thursdays 11:45am–1:45pm

ART 70010  Exoticisms
Prof. Judy Sund Thursdays 2:00pm-4:00pm

ART 86040 The Global Readymade
Prof. David Joselit Tuesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm

CLAS 71900  Divinity, Commodity and Sea in the Mediterranean World
Prof. Barbara Kowalzig Wednesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

CLAS 81800  Modern Views on Ancient Historiography 
Prof. Liv Yarrow Thursdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

CL 79500  Theory and Practice of Literature: Comparative Literature in the Age of Globalization
Prof. Sonali Perera Tuesdays 6:30pm-8:30pm

CL 80100  Existentialism/Phenomenology: Philosophy, Literature and Critique
Prof. Vincent Crapanzano Wednesday 2:00pm-4:00pm

CL 89100  History of Literary Theory and Criticism I
Prof. André Aciman Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

CL 80900  Clues, Evidence and Conjectural Paradigm: A Comparative Investigation of Early
            Modern Narrative

Prof. Monica Calabritto Wednesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

ENGL 89000  Theories and Fictions of the Archive
Prof. Tanya Agathocleous Fridays 11:45am-1:45pm

ENG 86900  Writing the World: Multiple Modernities, Women and the Archive
Prof. Meena Alexander Mondays 11:45am-1:45pm

ENG 71800  Renaissance Sex
Profs. Mario DiGangi and William Fisher Tuesdays 11:45am-1:45pm

ENG 86800  Global South and Decolonization in Literature and Theory
Prof. Peter Hitchcock Wednesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

ENG 75500  Readings in African-American Literary/Cultural Criticism
Prof. Eric Lott Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
 
FREN 87200  Refugee Crises: History and Law, Narrative, Poetry and Film
Prof. Domna Stanton Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

FREN 87400  Globalizing the Enlightenment
Prof. Helena Rosenblatt Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

HIST 72400  Authoritarian National Populism and the Crisis of Democracy
Prof. Richard Wolin Mondays 6:30pm-8:30pm

HIST 72800  Global Perspectives on the Enlightenment
Prof. Helena Rosenblatt Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15 pm

HIST 72200  The Geopoliticization of Sex: Histories and Theories
Prof. Dagmar Herzog Tuesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm

HIST 78400  Sociology of Knowledge and Science
Prof. John Torpey Tuesdays 2pm-4 pm

HIST 72300  Contemporary Theory and History
Prof. Samira Haj Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15 pm 
 
SPAN 70200  Hispanic Critical and Cultural Theory
Prof. Oswaldo Zavala Mondays 4:15pm-6:15 pm

SPAN 80000  Language, Identity and Political Economy
Prof. José del Valle Tuesdays 11:45pm-1:45pm 
 
MUS 74500  Seminar in Theory/Analysis
Prof. Poundie Burstein Mondays 10am-1pm

MUS 84000  Seminar in Music: Disability, Culture, and Society
Profs. Joseph Straus and Julia Miele Rodas Wednesdays 2pm-5pm

MUS 82502  History of Theory II: 1590-1950
Prof. William Rothstein Wednesdays 2pm-5pm
 
LING 70100  Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics
Profs. Dianne Bradley and Christina Tortora Mondays 4:15pm-6:15pm
 
PHIL 77800  Interpretative Practices
Profs. Noel Carroll and Stephen Neale Tuesdays 11:45am-1:45pm

PHIL 78600  Decolonial Feminisms
Prof. Serene Khader Thursdays 11:45am-1:45pm

PHIL 77850  Social Ontology: Between Theory and Practice
Prof. Carol Gould Tuesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm

PHIL 76200  Simone Weil (1909-43): Life, Work, Thought, Influence
Prof. Stephen Grover Mondays 4:15pm-6:15pm

PHIL 77600  Critical Philosophy of Race
Prof. Charles Mills Mondays 6:30pm-8:30pm

PHIL 77900  Ideology and Propaganda
Prof. Graham Priest Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

PHIL 77700  Aesthetic Psychology
Prof. Jesse Prinz Tuesdays 9:30am-11:30am
 
PSC 72000  American Politics: Theories and Core Concepts
Prof. Brian Arbour Mondays 6:30pm-8:30pm

PSC 87800  Politics of Identity
Prof. Julie George Thursdays 2:00pm-4:00pm

PSC 71902  Authoritarian National Populism and the Crisis of Democracy
Prof. Richard Wolin Mondays 6:30pm-8:30pm

PSC 80304  Perspectives on Modernity
Prof. Uday Mehta Mondays 2:00pm-4:00pm

PSC 80609  Race, Nation & Narrative
Prof. George Shulman Thursdays 2:00pm-4:00pm

PSC 71908  Machiavelli
Prof. Benedetto Fontana Thursdays 6:30pm-8:30pm

PSC 80605  Social Ontology: Between Theory and Practice
Prof. Carol Gould Tuesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm

PSYC 80103 Critical Methods in Contentious Times 
Prof. Michelle Fine
 
SOC 74600  Political Economy & Social Change
Prof. Roslyn Bologh Mondays 6:30pm-8:30pm

SOC 86800  Cultural Sociology
Prof. James Jasper Thursdays 2:00pm-4:00 pm

SOC 70100  Development of Sociological Theory
Prof. Julia Wrigley Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

SOC 73200  Global Feminism
Prof. Hester Eisenstein Mondays 2:00pm-4:00pm

SOC 82800  Sociology of Knowledge and Science
Prof. John Torpey Tuesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm



ANTH 70300  History of Anthropological Theory
Profs. Dana Davis and Donald Robotham Wednesdays 10:45am-1:45pm  

ANTH 71700  Theoretical Approaches to Nature & Environment
Prof. Melissa Checker Mondays 2:00pm-4:00pm

ANTH 80900  Existentialism/Phenomenology
Prof. Vincent Crapanzano Wednesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm

ANTH 81300  Thinking About the State Through Foucault and Beyond
Prof. Talal Asad Mondays 11:45am-1:45pm

ANTH 81700  Anti-Capitalist Thought and Action
Profs. David Harvey and Jeff Maskovsky Wednesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm

ANTH 81900  Heterodox Marxism 
Prof. Gary Wilder Thursdays 11:45am–1:45pm

ART 70010  Exoticisms
Prof. Judy Sund Thursdays 2:00pm-4:00pm
This course surveys the processes by which non - European peoples and production have been reimagined and repurposed in a variety  of modern Western media (from painting and architecture to advertising, performance and body modification) – in the service of projects ranging from  the propagandistic and commercial to the escapist and erotic. Although exoticist practices are age - old, this course focuses on those that burgeoned in the Age of Discovery and flourished in tandem with 18 th - and 19 th - century colonialism and imperialism, and surging tourism. Theories of the exotic – as outlined by Victor Segalen, James Clifford, Tzvetan Todorov, Roger  Célestin, Deborah Root,  Peter Mason, et al. – and considerations of parallel developments in literature inform discussions of chinoiserie and japonisme; Orientalism; portrayals of the Noble Savage; and Western constructions of race and its hierarchies.  

ART 86040 The Global Readymade
Prof. David Joselit Tuesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm
We can note three phases in the tradition of the readymade and appropriation since Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel of 1913. First, they include early enactments in which the readymade posed an ontological challenge to artworks through the equation of commodity and art object. Second, practices in which readymades were deployed semantically as lexical elements within a sculpture, painting, installation or projection as in many mid-twentieth-century practices ranging from those of Robert Rauschenberg to Carolee Schneemann in the American context alone. A third phase, which will be the main subject of this seminar, most directly encompasses the global, where the appropriation of objects, images, and other forms of content challenges sovereignty over the cultural and economic value linked to things that emerge from particular cultural contexts ranging from Aboriginal painting in Australia to the appropriation of Mao’s cult of personality in 1990s China. This course will consider the most recent phase of the readymade drawing on a wide variety of artists from around the world.

CLAS 71900  Divinity, Commodity and Sea in the Mediterranean World
Prof. Barbara Kowalzig Wednesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
This seminar will examine how Greek polytheism engages the economic sphere. How is the divine world implicated in production, supply and economic exchange in the Mediterranean? In particular, it will address the relationship between individual gods or sets of gods and the ‘product’ they are commonly associated with, such as Demeter and the grain, Dionysos and the wine, Athena and the olive etc. A fundamental question will be how a god’s power (‘mode of action’), such as Demeter’s ability to effect ‘production’ and ‘growth’, comes to bear on economic activity and institutions, shaping a city’s political economy, or maritime networks of supply. The course will start by introducing students to the methods used in the study of Greek polytheism, to relevant approaches in economic anthropology and economic theory and to recent work on the Mediterranean as an interconnected historical space. A number of sessions will then be dedicated to the divine world involved in agricultural production, that is to say cult, myth, and ritual associated with the Mediterranean ‘triad’ (grain, olive, wine); followed by mining and metallurgy, slave labour and slave trade; luxury commodities, such as textiles, spices and perfumes. A final part will tackle the mechanisms of divine intervention in economic transactions, i.e. examine the ‘gods of the market place’ (theoi agoraioi); and ‘gods of trade’ and ‘exchange’ such as Hermes and Aphrodite. This course will start on Wednesday, 12 September.

CLAS 81800  Modern Views on Ancient Historiography 
Prof. Liv Yarrow Thursdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
Ancient historians were self-conscious creators of narrative. This course will explore themes traditionally associated with the genre of history in the Greco-Roman world, including, but not limited to: universalism, local histories, the role of speeches, use of sources, intersection with other genres, the role of the historian in society, intrusion of authorial voice, narrative focalization, and explanations of historical causation. The course will simultaneously examine how these themes and related issues have been treated by both classicists and modern historical theorists. All general course materials provided in digital format. Students will each select a different ancient historian on which to focus their individual work for the semester.

CL 79500  Theory and Practice of Literature: Comparative Literature in the Age of Globalization
Prof. Sonali Perera Tuesdays 6:30pm-8:30pm
As a range of comparatist scholars have noticed, Marx observes in the manifesto (of all unlikely places) that world literature “arises” as the by-product of exploitative, even imperialist, designs. Where world literature is defined narrowly as literature of global circulation, its market driven, cosmopolitan character might be deemed to be the happy accident of capital movement guided by its cultural and economic custodians. But what happens when we expand and complicate our frame of reference? What of other methods and models for conceiving/reconceiving world literature as literary internationalism? What concepts and ideologies of comparison derive from a theory of value in a global and unequal world? And how do we understand the relationship between comparative literature and world literature—as antagonistic or supplementary?
Since Marx’s thoughts on the subject, in recent years, literary theory scholars find themselves returning to consider the problems and possibilities of world literature. The past two decades have seen a surge of publications agitating for and against both a revitalized Weltliteratur and a newly re-tooled comparative literature. WReC (The Warwick Research Collective) proposes a new world-systems theory approach which conceives of world-literature (with a hyphen) as a “re-making of comparative literature after the multicultural debates and the disciplinary critique of Eurocentricism.” In the latest issue of the PMLA journal devoted to “Literature in the World,” Simon Gikandi keeps the question alive: “But if world literature takes us everywhere and nowhere, are we better off with comparative literature, a disciplinary formation driven by the idea that literatures can be studied in their distinctive languages, across national and linguistic boundaries, without abandoning the languages and grounds that gave rise to them?” And yet, if in minimal terms, the study of comparative literature is distinguished from that of world literature on the grounds that the former requires specialized knowledge of multiple languages whereas world literature is merely literature in translation and generally studied in English, do we agree with how this academic sub-division of labor is coded and institutionalized? What is at stake in constructing the difference between world literary approaches and comparative literature in this way? Is it the case, as has been argued, that the turn to world literature has prompted a new strain of scholarship in comparative literature?
In our class, we will engage with some of these questions, as we take the measure of the state of the field debates. Throughout our course, you are encouraged to consider how these debates might shape the way that we think of research and writing in literary studies today.
Simply put, then, this course offers us a chance to study the resurgence of world literature as an interpretive paradigm against and through the perspective of new scholarship on the theory and practice of comparative literature. While we will study touchstone texts (by Goethe, Marx, Heidegger, Auerbach, Said, Jameson, Ahmad, Wallerstein, Moretti, Damrosch, Spivak, Saussy, Amin), we will also familiarize ourselves with recent scholarship including works by Casanova, Apter, Melas, Mufti, Robbins, Cheah, WReC. We will ground our discussions by “applying” theory to literary works by Woolf, Manto, Pamuk, Devi, Coetzee, and Salih. If time permits, alongside selections from theory and literature, we may also read excerpts from one or two of the ACLA’s emblematic state of the discipline reports.
Course requirements: 1.) A 20 minute presentation on one or two of the weekly readings. 2.)  A 2 page prospectus for the final paper. 3) A 15-20 page final paper. 4.) Engaged class participation.

CL 80100  Existentialism/Phenomenology: Philosophy, Literature and Critique
Prof. Vincent Crapanzano Wednesday 2:00pm-4:00pm
This seminar will be devoted to readings in the philosophy, literature, and literary criticism influenced by phenomenology and existentialism. We will consider such questions as intentionality of consciousness, the priority of consciousness over existence or existence over consciousness, other minds, being/Being, nonbeing, bad faith, guilt, freedom, commitment, ethical responsibility, care, and despair. Particular attention will be given to the problem of language in phenomenological description and existential hermeneutics.  Readings will include selections from Husserl, Sartre, Heidegger, Binswanger, and Merleau-Ponty, Bachelard, and Poulet as well as (but not limited to) novels by Blanchot, Sartre, Sarraute, Camus, and Robbe-Grillet.” Students will be encouraged to consider the relationship between phenomenology,  existentialism and social and cultural description.

CL 89100  History of Literary Theory and Criticism I
Prof. André Aciman Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
With readings from Plato, Aristotle, and Longinus to Dante, Sidney, Boileau, Dryden, and Lessing, this course will examine the history and evolution of literary theory in the classical, medieval, and early modern periods. It will also examine such fundamental terms as truth, beauty, nature, and artifact with which pre-Romantic Western critics have attempted to understand literary works of art. This course will also explore the legacy and limitations of these and other terms and their impact on criticism today.

CL 80900  Clues, Evidence and Conjectural Paradigm: A Comparative Investigation of Early
            Modern Narrative

Prof. Monica Calabritto Wednesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
The term “conjectural paradigm” is inspired by an essay entitled “Clues: Roots of an Evidential Paradigm” (It., 1970) authored by Italian historian Carlo Ginzburg, in which he argues that physicians, detectives and historians have in common a way of investigating their subjects that is based on clue and traces, the gathering of which develops into a conjectural knowledge.
 
Taking its cue from this definition, the seminar will discuss narratives constructed in early modern Italy and Europe, emerging not only from literary works, but also and mostly from medical and legal documents/artifacts—medical reports on cases of insanity and poisoning, and trials of witches, murderers and grafters. Through and along with the reading of these narratives, we will discuss theoretical and methodological issues such as the notions of conjecture, paradigm and evidence applied to the legal and the scientific sphere; the relationship between macro- and micro history; the tension between narrative and social dimension in micro historical accounts; the investigation of people on the margins, like women, drifters, sexual deviants, mad people, workers; the relationship between historical account and historical fiction; the relevance of micro history in the age of global history, individual and collective agency.
 
All students who take the course are required to attend all the sessions of the seminar. Students who take the seminar for 4 credits are required to write a 18-page term paper to be submitted the last day of class; 2-page weekly reflections on the readings and on class discussion; a 15-minute oral presentation. Students who take this course for 2 credits can either give a 15-minute oral presentation + written report, or write the weekly reflections.
 
What follows is a provisional list of the texts we are going to discuss during the seminar:
 
Archival manuscript documents of sixteenth- and seventeenth century criminal trials held in Bologna on criminal insanity, homicide, stalking
G. Brucker, Giovanni and Lusanna: Love and Marriage in Renaissance Florence
Thomas V. Cohen, Love and Death in Renaissance Italy (Chicago: Chicago UP, 2004)
Natalie Zemon Davis, Fictions in the Archive  (Stanford University Press, 1990)
Id., Women on the Margins: Three Seventeenth-Century Lives (Belknap Press, 1997) (sections)
Michel de Certeau, The Possession at Loudon (Chicago: Chicago UP, 1996)
Carlo Ginzburg, The Cheese and the Worms; The Cosmos of a Sixteenth-Century Miller tr. J and A. Tedeschi (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1992)
Alessandro Manzoni, The Betrothed (sections)
Thomas Robisheaux, The Last Witch of Langerburg. Murder in a German Village (New York & London: WW Norton & Company, 2009)
Stendhal, Italian Chronicles
Francesca Trivellato, The Familiarity of Strangers: The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-Cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period (Yale University Press, 2012)
 
On theoretical and methodological issues (also provisional):
 
Roland Barthes, “L'Effet de Réel”, Communications, n. 11, Mars 1968, Pp. 84-89
Roger Chartier,  “History, Time, and Space,” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 2 (June 1, 2011): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/100
Carlo Ginzburg, Clues, Myths, and the Historical Method, tr. J and A. Tedeschi (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1989) (selections)
Id., Threads and Traces. True False Fictive, tr. J and A. Tedeschi ( Berkeley: U of California Press, 2012) (selections)
Siegfried Kracauer and Paul Oskar Kristeller, History-The Last Things Before the Last (Markus Wiener Publishers, 2013)
Thomas Kuehn, “Review: Reading Microhistory: The Example of Giovanni and Lusanna,” The Journal of Modern History, vol 61, n. 3 (Sept. 1989) 512-34
Dominick LaCapra, History and Criticism (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1985)
Jill Lepore, “Historians Who Love Too Much: Reflections on Microhistory and Biography,” The Journal of American History, Vol. 88, No. 1 (Jun., 2001), pp. 129-144
Sigurđur Gylfy Magnússon and István M. Szijártó, What is Microhistory? Theory and Practice (New York: Routledge, 2013)
Matti Peltonen, “Clues, Margins, and Monads: The Micro-Macro Link in Historical Research,” History and Theory, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Oct., 2001), pp. 347-359
Andrew I Port, “History from Below, the History of Everyday Life, and Microhistory”, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, 2nd edition, Volume 11 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-08-097086-8.62156-6, pp. 108-113
Lawrence Stone “The Revival of Narrative: Reflections on a New Old History,” Past & Present, No. 85 (Nov., 1979), pp. 3-24
Francesca Trivellato, “Is There a Future for Italian Microhistory in the Age of Global History?” California Italian Studies, 2(1), 2011

ENGL 89000  Theories and Fictions of the Archive
Prof. Tanya Agathocleous Fridays 11:45am-1:45pm
This course will use a broad range of literary and theoretical writings on archives as a way to think through the implications, methodologies and problems posed by archival research. What counts as an archive and how are archives constituted, imaginatively, materially, and politically? What is their relation to institutions, corporations, and states? What makes archives accessible or inaccessible? How do material archives deal with questions of curation, restoration, preservation and representation? What kinds of affects do archives have and what kinds of affects do we bring to them?
We will focus in particular on nineteenth-century colonial and imperial archives as well as on a range of NYC archives, which we will visit. Final projects will be grounded in original archival research and can take the form of a conventional seminar paper or a digital archive, built individually or collaboratively. Readings will include works by Anjali Arondekar; Walter Benjamin; Jorge Luis Borges; Antoinette Burton; Jacques Derrida; Charles Dickens; Michel Foucault; Paul Fyfe; Meredith Martin; Helena Michie and Robyn Warhol; Claudia Rankine; W. G. Sebald; and Ann Stoler, among others.

ENGL 86900  Writing the World: Multiple Modernities, Women and the Archive
Prof. Meena Alexander Mondays 11:45am-1:45pm
What might it mean to write the world and in so doing dream of remaking it in the text? How does the notion of modernity play out in the Global South? How  might we make sense of the claims of cultural memory, and inescapable issues of body sexuality and race? In this regard, what are the ethical and aesthetic implications of Bandung (the Asian-African conference of 1955)  documented by Richard Wright in Beyond the Color Curtain: A Report on the Bandung Conference?  Drawing on a range of materials we will explore these and other questions that surface in twentieth and twenty-first century acts of inscription. Issues of gender and the archive, aesthetic form and cultural translation will be key. We will study several women poets of the North American continent and the key questions issues of race and embodiment, setting them by the side of  writers from the global South. Some of the writers we will discuss-- Kamala Das, Joy Harjo, Qurratulain Hyder, Arun Kolatkar, Audre Lorde, Sadat Hasan Manto, Virginia Woolf, A.K. Ramanujan, Claudia Rankine, Adrienne Rich, Richard Wright. We will explore elements of visual culture through the work of two woman artists of  the modern era --the Brazilian painter Tarsila do Amaral and the notion of cultural cannibalism --`Antropofagia’ -- central to the creation of an indigenous modernity; and the Indian-Hungarian painter Amrita Shergill who created her startling `Self Portrait as Tahitian’ (1934) and wrote " Europe belongs to Picasso, Matisse, Braque.... India belongs only to me". Theoretical materials from Agamben, Arondekar, Berlant, Derrida, Djebar, Guha, Kalliney, Merleau-Ponty, the RAQS collective, Spivak, Stoler, and others. Students will be encouraged to bring their own special interests into play and consider archives based in New York City, including the Berg Collection at NYPL and the Morgan Library.The course will be run as a seminar with weekly readings and discussions. One short mid-term paper, based on our evolving discussions and one long final paper. Some course materials will be uploaded onto dropbox. Other texts will be on order at a local bookstore.

ENGL 71800  Renaissance Sex
Profs. Mario DiGangi and William Fisher Tuesdays 11:45am-1:45pm
This seminar will explore the repertoire of scholarly methods that have been used for understanding sex and sexuality in early modern literature, with an eye to current debates and future directions in the field. We will consider how different theoretical and historical approaches have produced varying accounts of sex as an object of inquiry; we will engage various reading strategies for elucidating sexual meaning in literary and non-literary texts; and we will reflect critically on questions of evidence, language, genre, theatricality, and periodization.
 
The following kinds of questions will guide our discussions: What are the consequences of emphasizing historical alterity or historical continuity in the study of sex? Are concepts such as sexual identity, subjectivity, or community useful in analyzing early modern modes of eroticism? How was sex itself depicted? Which acts feature regularly in texts from the period, and which appear to have been unknown? How were sex acts and erotic discourses structured by social categories such as race, gender and class? How were phenomena like consent and sexual violence conceptualized? How might the field ultimately move beyond familiar sexual paradigms and taxonomies (i.e., homoeroticism/heteroeroticism) and access alternative forms of erotic knowledge, practice, and relationality in early modern culture? How do particular textual and performative elements (i.e., puns, soliloquies, gestures, costumes, voices, metatheatrical moments, offstage actions) convey or confound sexual meaning?
 
Readings:
In addressing these questions, we will be examining a wide range of primary materials, from plays and poetry to court cases and pornography. First, we will be reading a number of canonical literary texts such as Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis and Othello, Marlowe’s Edward II, Barnfield’s The Affectionate Shepherd, Donne’s “Sappho to Philaenis” and the poems of Katherine Philips and Aphra Behn. In addition, we will be exploring “pornographic” texts like Rochester’s Sodom, The School of Venus, Nashe’s Choise of Valentines and other poems featuring dildos like Seignor Dildo’s Adventures in Britain. Finally, we will study an array of non-literary texts including medical treatises (such as John Henry Meibom’s The Use of Flogging in Venereal Affairs and Giles Jacob’s Treatise of Hermaphrodites) and court cases (such as the infamous Castlehaven trial).

ENGL 86800  Global South and Decolonization in Literature and Theory
Prof. Peter Hitchcock Wednesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
In 1884 an international conference made Greenwich the locus for the Prime Meridian, basically confirming what the world already knew about the projected centrality and global reach of the British Empire.  The imperial hubris of meridians has been thoroughly decolonized but the world order remains striated by the geopolitics and geocultures of imperial desire.  How does the conceptual framework of the Global South, a discrepant latitude to be sure, challenge and interrogate the deleterious implications of such will to power?  Under actually existing globalization, doesn’t decolonization persist almost everywhere?  Isn’t socioeconomic and cultural hegemony just as discernible beyond the Euramerican axis?  Or, with the “flattening” of the world (Friedman) and occasional attempts to “end” history (Fukuyama) could we not argue that the decolonizing and decolonial instincts of the Global South have been overreached in the last quarter century?  Are we so “woke” with appropriate cosmopolitanism that the cosmopolitics of appropriation have themselves been eclipsed?  Does location decide perspicacity and world view (like the Greenwich Meridian) or is scale itself (particularly space and time) a primary scene of decolonizing literature and theory?  This course will explore how literature and theory imagines the Global South decolonizing.  Linking the Global South to decolonization is not a methodological curiosity but is a powerful heuristic for understanding both the dreams and dead ends of postcolonial projects in the current conjuncture (Smith).  Crucial genealogies of subaltern studies have undermined Eurocentric cartographies of thought and yet some have also been criticized for harboring Western philosophy in that very process.  The invocation of the Global South does not settle such arguments in advance but instead encourages a critique of the cultural logics in play.  While the course will begin with some prime examples of decolonizing the mind from the social sciences (Comaroff, Ness) and philosophy (Dussel), its main aim is to pose the Global South as an imaginary challenge for writers and thinkers, particularly as they broach what has not happened since the victories against imperialism and the formation of postcolonial states (Larsen, Lazarus).  If the Global South is less secure in its spatial coordinates (south of what?) does it not remain counter-hegemonic when it comes to imperial legacies and pretentions, including those of academic disciplines and specific traditions of thought?  How do writers resist the idea decolonization is just another niche market, a world literature as global cultural capital?  While some grounding in both postcolonial and decolonial thought would be useful (we will reference Spivak, Bhambra, and Mignolo in this regard), for the most part course readings will help coordinate postcolonial parameters, meridians that challenge the orthodoxies of latitude and longitude (as in modernity itself).  In this way, a literary and theoretical appreciation of the Global South helps hone vital critical tools in reading the work of decolonization today.  In addition to some of the theory already invoked, we will consider pertinent examples of materialist theory on globalization and, of course, key literary provocations from among Adichie, Hamid, Roy, Vladislavic, Mahajan, Kadare, and Patel.

ENGL 75500  Readings in African-American Literary/Cultural Criticism
Prof. Eric Lott Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
This seminar will introduce students to some of the more significant recent critical and theoretical trends within the study of African American literature and culture. The course will be run colloquium style, with frequent visiting lecturers and co-instructors in the field. Participants will discuss the formation of Black American identity as it is manipulated, challenged or perhaps even erased within “peculiar” aesthetic, performative, spatial, theoretical, or political contexts. At the same time, the course will examine how African American Studies intersects with and challenges Feminist Studies, Gay and Lesbian Studies, Ethnic Studies, and American Studies. Students will be asked to write several short papers during the course of the semester. They will also do at least one in class presentation. Works we will read include: Christina Sharpe, In the Wake: On Blackness and Being. 2016; Brittney Cooper: Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women, 2017; Stuart Hall, The Fateful Triangle: Race, Ethnicity, Nation, 2017; Fred Moten, Black and Blur, 2017; C. Riley Snorton, Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity, 2017; Alexander Weheliye, Habeas Viscus, 2014; Tina Campt, Listening to Images, 2017; Brent Hayes Edwards, Epistrophies: Jazz and the Literary Imagination, 2017; Jennifer Lynn Stoever: The Sonic Color Line: Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening, 2016; and Andre Carrington, Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction. 2016.
 
FREN 87200  Refugee Crises: History and Law, Narrative, Poetry and Film
Prof. Domna Stanton Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
Why are we in the midst of an unparalleled refugee crisis that involves 65 million people? Such dislocations and displacements have occurred since the late 17th century, when the term was first coined; and they have proliferated over the past century, notably since 1915. Who is a refugee? Who qualifies for asylum, why and why not? What about unaccompanied minors; victims of forced migrations? What is the status of economic migrants; of internally displaced persons? How should we classify those fleeing climate catastrophes? Are these others viewed as human?
This course in critical refugee studies will begin with history (and histories), then focus on the development, successes –and failures--of the human rights regime, humanitarian law and regional instruments, such as those of the European Union. We will examine transnational North-South disparities as drivers of migration, and lastly, the current ideological and nationalist trends that have led to securitization, the closing of borders, and authoritarianism in the post 9/11 world.
We will consider particular cases: the Armenian genocide; the Holocaust; the aftermath of the Vietnam war; the intractable Palestinian problem; persecutions in Darfur and South Sudan; the flight from dictatorships, gangs and failing economies in the Americas (including Haiti); the European Union’s integrity. We will end with the present crisis catalyzed by the Syrian war.
Our approach will be interdisciplinary: critical studies in history, theory and law will combine with close readings of novels, including graphic texts, poetry, memoirs/testimonials, and documentaries that represent/construct figures of refugees as well as themes of longing, remembering and return in refugee art.
Authors/film makers include Abdelrazaq, Agamben, Ai Wei Wei, Arendt, Balibar, Bauman, Butler, Dandicat, Darwish, Derrida, Dummett, Eggers, Erpenbeck, Hisham, Lanzmann, Said, Viet Than Nguyen
Work for the course will involve, beyond close readings of assignments, a class presentation (and write-up) of a case study with other members of a team; a 20 page paper on a topic developed in consultation with the instructor; and a final exam. Course materials will be uploaded to Blackboard cAugust 15, 2018.
Please direct all questions about the course to Domna Stanton (dstanton112@yahoo.com).

FREN 87400  Globalizing the Enlightenment
Prof. Helena Rosenblatt Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
The Eighteenth Century European Enlightenment is widely seen as a transformative moment in Western culture, one which gave birth to many of our most cherished ideals. We are often told, for example, that it is to the Enlightenment that we owe our modern notions of human rights, representative government, and liberal democracy. However, the recent “global turn” in scholarship has led historians to ask some new and often unsettling questions. How, for example, did eighteenth-century European thinkers perceive the world beyond their own borders? How did they get their information and to what purposes was that information put?  Did regions outside of Europe experience an Enlightenment too? With the help of both primary and secondary sources, we will ask how adopting a “global” perspective on the Enlightenment might change our view of it. Is it even correct to call the Enlightenment European?

HIST 72400  Authoritarian National Populism and the Crisis of Democracy
Prof. Richard Wolin Mondays 6:30pm-8:30pm
With communism’s unexpected demise in 1989, optimistic forecasts concerning the worldwide triumph of democracy proliferated. During the 1980s and 1990s, authoritarian regimes unraveled not only in Europe, but also in Asia, Latin America, and South Africa, spurring hopes that a long overdue “Third Wave” of democratization was underway.
Recently, it has become painfully evident just how premature and naïve these prognoses were. Over the last ten years, instead of the triumph of liberal democracy, we have witnessed the global ascendancy of authoritarian national populism.
In part, these developments signify a defensive response to the depredations of globalization and neoliberalism. But they also represent a rejoinder to problems that, historically, have been endemic to modern democracy – problems such as: (1) how to determine who counts as part of the demos (women? those without property? religious and ethnic minorities?); and (2) which institutional mechanisms ensure that that the “will of the people” is adequately reflected by the representatives who purportedly govern in its name.
Today, the disturbing rise of political authoritarianism and ethnic nationalism reflects diminished confidence in the capacity of parliamentary democracy to remedy the acute social disequilibrium – economic, cultural, and political – intrinsic to political liberalism. Our approach to these problems will be threefold: (1) historical, (2) theoretical, and (3) political. Among the noteworthy theorists of political authoritarianism that we will discuss are: Hannah Arendt, Carl Schmitt, and leading representatives of the Frankfurt School (T. W. Adorno, Herbert Marcuse, etc.)

HIST 72800  Global Perspectives on the Enlightenment
Prof. Helena Rosenblatt Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15 pm
The Eighteenth Century Enlightenment is widely seen as a transformative moment in Western culture, one with radical consequences for almost all aspects of Western thought. But how did eighteenth century thinkers perceive the world outside of Europe? Did regions outside of Europe experience an Enlightenment too? Finally, was there a cross-fertilization of ideas between the regions and, if so, how did it happen and how did it manifest itself? With the help of both primary and secondary sources, we will investigate the Enlightenment from a global perspective.

HIST 72200  The Geopoliticization of Sex: Histories and Theories
Prof. Dagmar Herzog Tuesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm
In the early twenty-first century, sexual matters saturate high politics: from the giving or withholding of billions in development aid to the preoccupations of supranational human rights treaties and juridical institutions to the reasons given for nations to intervene in wars to the shapes taken by welfare states or their dismantling to transnationally organized activism and social media-fueled social movements across the ideological spectrum. We are living through an era of “the geopoliticization of sex,” involving levels of imbrication of sex with global politics to an extent that Michel Foucault could not have imagined when he was writing in the 1970s about sex as “an especially dense transfer point for relations of power.” We confront as well the double fact that, on the one hand, sexual rights of all kinds turn out to be fragile and contested, not just at state levels and within revitalized religious traditions but also popularly (as they are the focus of apparently considerable ambivalence for many people) while, on the other, the so recently hard-won ideals of sexual rights can, it turns out, be misused for other purposes entirely. Meanwhile, we encounter new questions about what exactly “sexuality” or “sex” even is, as well as recurrent skepticism about the very concepts of “rights,” “individual autonomy,” and “self-determination.”
The legacies of multiple pasts hang over all the current struggles. This is evident whether we are considering the ravages of HIV/AIDS or Zika or family planning programs or novel reproductive technologies, the persistence of sexual aggression and harm in war and peace, the instrumentalization of either support or hostility to LGBT individuals for other political agendas, the international concern with sex trafficking at the intersection of prostitution and wider migration processes, the growing affirmative visibility of individuals with disabilities concomitantly with the onslaught of neoliberal austerity projects, or the centrality of sexualized themes in the resurgence of xenophobia and right-wing populism worldwide.
This course will combine historiography and scholarship from adjacent disciplines (from military history and the history of economics to the histories of emotions and of the modern self, and from the histories of human rights law and NGOs to the sociology and anthropology of violence, of religion, and of disease and public health) with relevant theoretical readings with the pursuit of exploratory independent projects presented either as conference talks or as research papers. The theoretical readings will include texts concerned with psychoanalytic and decolonial approaches as well as epistemology, ontology, temporality, and causation. Foucault, in short, will be supplemented not only with Freud but also with Guattari, Laplanche, Koselleck, Moyn, Gessen, Stoler, Shepard, Scott, deLauretis, and Descola.
Together we will consider: What has changed even in the last five years in the questions we pose to the past? How can we make sense of recursive returns, deferred effects, and unexpected repercussions between different moments in time? And above all, a conceptual puzzle relevant to all historians: What should count as the pertinent backstories to which subsequent developments? We will thus spend significant time exploring the intersections of aspects of the history of sexuality with the histories of slavery, colonialism, Cold War conflicts, and past wars and genocides.

HIST 78400  Sociology of Knowledge and Science
Prof. John Torpey Tuesdays 2pm-4 pm
This course examines the development of the sociology of knowledge and science from its nineteenth-century origins to the present day.  It seeks to convey an understanding of a) the ways in which knowledge has been grasped in sociological terms and b) the ways in which science and knowledge have affected social life in the past two centuries or so.

HIST 72300  Contemporary Theory and History
Prof. Samira Haj Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15 pm
The question of the relationship of theory to history is laden with problems. While it is obvious that historians carry their research in archives, it is not obvious what analytical or theoretical frameworks historians utilize to make sense of the past, its relationship to the present and its potential relevance to the future. Obviously, the question of what is particularly historical about the discipline of history is central to the debate. The objective of this seminar is to explore some of the concerns that have haunted historians since history established itself as a modern discipline, including the notions of historical temporality, historical memory, conceptual history, periodization, historical materialism, genealogy and others that are more conceptual rather than historical per se. The course is de facto thematically-organized as well as interdisciplinary, which by implication means that it will be drawing on different bodies of knowledge, including philosophy, political theory, anthropology, religion and gender studies with some recent written narratives and accounts drawn from the history field itself.  
 
SPAN 70200  Hispanic Critical and Cultural Theory
Prof. Oswaldo Zavala Mondays 4:15pm-6:15 pm

SPAN 80000  Language, Identity and Political Economy
Prof. José del Valle Tuesdays 11:45pm-1:45pm 
In this seminar, we will examine language´s involvement in the contemporary construction and mobilization of ethnic and national identities as well as in the development of late capitalist forms of economic organization. The sociolinguistic objects and specific case-studies examined throughout the seminar will include, but not be limited to, language revitalization processes in Latin America, the politics of language and ethnic and national identity in the United States, the promotion of Spanish in global linguistic markets, and normalization policies and discourses on behalf of minority languages in Europe -mainly in Spain-.
 
The seminar´s narrative and theoretical footing -anchored in critical sociolinguistics and glotopolítica- will be established through Monica Heller and Alexandre Duchêne’s proposal to analyze the deployment of linguistic ideologies around the 'pride' and 'profit' tropes (Language in Late capitalism, 2012). The studies and the interpretive frameworks put forth in this book will be placed in dialectic relation with each other and with other sociological and political views of language´s interface with capital and labour, identity and citizenship, and politics and power. Various approaches to language and identity will be introduced through John E. Joseph´s Language and Identity (2004); critical approaches to language and political economy will be discussed through Marnie Holborow´s Language and Neoliberalism (2015) and Monica Heller and Bonnie McElnihhy´s Language, Capitalism, Colonialism (2017); and the articulation of language and politics will be studied through John Joseph´s Language and Politics (2009) and Bentivegna, del Valle, Niro and Villa´s Anuario de Glotopolítica 1 (2017).
 
As the seminar proceeds, discussion of each topic will be informed by the following readings among others: José del Valle, La lengua, ¿patria común? (2007); Norma Mendoza-Denton, Homegirls: Language and Cultural Practices among Latina Youth Gangs (2008); Jan Blommaert, The Sociolinguistics of Globalization (2010); Robert Phillipson, Linguistic Imperialism Continued (2010); H. Sami Alim and Geneva Smitherman, Articulate While Black: Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S. (2012); Angela Reyes, Language, Identity, and Stereotype among Southeast Asian American Youth (2012); Jacqueline Urla, Reclaiming Basque: Language, Nation, and Cultural Activism (2012); Elvira Arnoux and Susana Nothstein´s Temas de glotopolítica: Integración regional sudamericana y panhispanismo (2014); Serafín Coronel-Molina, Language Ideology, Policy and Planning in Peru (2015); Kathryn A. Woolard, Singular and Plural: Ideologies of Linguistic Authority in 21st Century Catalonia (2016); Jonathan Rosa, Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: Raciolinguistic Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad (2018). [The seminar will be conducted in various forms of Spanish and English; so, receptive knowledge of both languages is required; class participation and papers may be in any language or languages I think I can understand.]
 
MUS 74500  Seminar in Theory/Analysis
Prof. Poundie Burstein Mondays 10am-1pm
An introduction to the practice of Schenkerian analysis, including discussion of its notation, terminology, and techniques. Assignments will involve intensive analyses of works and excerpts of works from the tonal repertoire, along with some readings from the scholarly literature. Students entering the class should have a strong background in harmony and counterpoint.

MUS 84000  Seminar in Music: Disability, Culture, and Society
Profs. Joseph Straus and Julia Miele Rodas Wednesdays 2pm-5pm
Like the fictions of gender and race, disability is a cultural and social formation that sorts bodies and minds into desirable (normal) and undesirable (abnormal, sick) categories. Regimes of representation in literature, art, music, theater, film, and popular culture—the ways that bodies and minds constructed as disabled are depicted—both reflect and shape cultural understandings of nonconforming identities and extraordinary bodies, affecting the lived experience of people understood as disabled, often in negative ways. Drawing on examples from the arts and popular culture, this course will interrogate the many ways disability identity has been confined to rigid and unproductive social, political, and aesthetic categories. It will also explore a significant counter-tradition in which disability is seen as a significant artistic resource and a desirable way of being in the world. Topics will include: the medical and social models of disability; narratives of disability; disability and performance; disability writing (memoir and fiction); narratives of overcoming; the histories and cultures of autism, deafness, blindness, intellectual disability, and madness. We will pay particular attention to the intersection of disability with other more familiar tropes of human disqualification, including race, gender, and sexuality.

MUS 82502  History of Theory II: 1590-1950
Prof. William Rothstein Wednesdays 2pm-5pm
This seminar covers roughly 350 years of music theory, from the pupils of Zarlino (d. 1590) to the middle of the twentieth century. Within this period, students will gain a broad knowledge of those disciplines that today are grouped together, somewhat arbitrarily, as “music theory.” They will read extensively in primary and secondary sources (all in English) and will consider these sources from both present-day and, so far as is possible, historically situated perspectives. Requirements include several short papers, a translation exercise, a final exam, and a term paper.
 
LING 70100  Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics
Profs. Dianne Bradley and Christina Tortora Mondays 4:15pm-6:15pm
An introduction to the intellectual foundations, methodologies, and motivations of linguistics.  What kinds of questions do linguists ask?  What do some of the answers look like?  And why?

The course will cover fundamental concepts in the core areas of linguistics, i.e., phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Their role in fields such as first and second language acquisition, sentence processing, language change, sociolinguistics and pragmatics, may be explored depending on faculty specialization.

A substantial component of the course will be the discussion and demonstration of analytical techniques used in contemporary linguistics and applied to problem sets.  A practicum will be attached to this course, taught by graduate student assistants.
 
PHIL 77800  Interpretative Practices
Profs. Noel Carroll and Stephen Neale Tuesdays 11:45am-1:45pm
Meaning and Interpretation is a course in which we examine meaning and the interpretation of meaning across various disciplines with their different emphases and methods.  We begin with the philosophy of language with particular stress on the Gricean approach to meaning.  Next we look at the notion of interpretation in literature and the arts paying particular attention to the so-called intentional fallacy and the debates surrounding it.  The notion of interpretation in the law -- including the interpretation of statutes and constitutions -- will occupy a segment of the course.  We will also consider interpretation in archaeology, in history and even jokes.  Students will be required to lead a discussion in class and to submit a final paper.  There are no prerequisites.  

PHIL 78600  Decolonial Feminisms
Prof. Serene Khader Thursdays 11:45am-1:45pm
This course explores the influence of regimes of colonization, racialization, and imperialism on conceptions of gender justice. It begins from the understanding of decolonial feminist philosophies as including both critical and constructive projects: the former involve exploring the ways Western concepts and histories promote a congruence between Western feminism and Western imperialism, and the latter involve constructing plural visions of solidarity, as well as local and global gender justice. Developing feminist solidarity and coalition requires an analysis of epistemic justice, or the roadblocks to mutual engagement with respect and reciprocity between differently situated groups. Hence, this course will pursue both epistemological and ethical aspects of transnational feminism. Some of the topics we will discuss include: the influence of the concept of modernity on conceptions of transnational justice and gender justice, the role of the concept of culture in feminist discourses, the difference between decolonial, postcolonial, and transnational feminist theoretical approaches, how to overcome racist and sexist patterns of epistemic prejudice, the idea that gender itself is a colonial imposition, and the ideal/non-ideal theory distinction.

PHIL 77850  Social Ontology: Between Theory and Practice
Prof. Carol Gould Tuesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm
Does a social or political collective exist over and above the individuals who comprise it?  Are individuals constituted by their social relations or are they free to choose the relations they have with other people? What are collective intentions and actions? Are gender and sex socially constructed or are they natural kinds? And do the answers to these questions have important normative implications for contemporary politics? These and related questions arise at the intersection of metaphysics and political theory and have garnered interest in both Anglo-American and Continental traditions of thought. It can be suggested, too, that social and political theories operate (however tacitly) with conceptions of the entities that make up social reality—of the nature of individuals and of their relations, where these conceptions range from radically individualistic to fully holistic ones of a community or body politic within which individuals gain their identities. Moreover, philosophical theories themselves, however abstract, may reflect ways of thinking rooted in forms of practical life, which in turn delimit their universality or reach. These various issues form the core of the project of social ontology.
 
This seminar will begin by analyzing this project as it emerges in the work of Hegel, Marx and Lukacs, and as it has developed in contemporary analytic theories such as those of Margaret Gilbert and Michael Bratman. It will consider notions of alterity, plurality, and the second-person perspective in Simone de Beauvoir, Emmanuel Levinas, Hannah Arendt, and Stephen Darwall, and will take up feminist relational ontologies and care approaches (e.g., in Seyla Benhabib and Virginia Held). The course will then focus on key topics in social ontology, including collective intentionality (Raimo Tuomela and the Bratman-Gilbert debate), the nature of institutions (John Searle, Steven Lukes), and of structures (Anthony Giddens and Sally Haslanger), moving to the ontology of groups in both continental and analytic frames (Jean-Paul Sartre, Iris Young, and Philip Pettit). The seminar will then consider some of the normative and practical implications of social ontological perspectives, including the vexed question of collective responsibility (e.g., Larry May), the metaphysics of sex and gender (Carol Gould, Asta Sveinsdottir), the ontology of race (Anthony Appiah, Philip Kitcher, and Charles Mills), and finally, feminist notions of relational autonomy and intersectional group identities and their import for understanding contemporary social and political life (Jennifer Nedelsky and Diana Meyers, among others).
 
Seminar members will be encouraged to relate the course materials to their ongoing research projects through oral presentations and analytical term papers, and will be expected to be active participants in the seminar discussions.

PHIL 76200  Simone Weil (1909-43): Life, Work, Thought, Influence
Prof. Stephen Grover Mondays 4:15pm-6:15pm
Simone Weil died 75 years ago, at 34. Well-known in left-wing intellectual and activist circles in France in the ‘30s, her influence has grown steadily since her death through her unpublished writings, including notebooks, journals, and correspondence, and through the efforts of admirers, including T.S. Eliot, Albert Camus, Pope Paul VI, Flannery O’Connor, Anne Carson, and Iris Murdoch.

Weil packed a lot into a short life: brilliant student, committed teacher, militant trade-unionist, critic of Marxism and Leninism, revolutionary syndicalist, factory worker, political journalist, pacifist, fighter in Spain, philosopher of work, grape-picker, social theorist, and an idiosyncratic Christian Platonist and mystic who refused baptism. The course will cover the historical and intellectual background to Weil’s life and thought, examine her principal political, philosophical, and theological writings (in translation), and assess her influence.

Among the writings covered: Weil’s dissertation on Descartes; Lectures on Philosophy; articles on Germany, Marxism-Leninism, and revolutionary politics from the early ‘30s; On Liberty and Oppression; ‘Factory Journal’ and other writings on work; anti-war writings from the mid- and late ‘30s; essays on Ancient Greece, including ‘The Iliad; or the Poem of Force;’ the theological papers and letters collected in Waiting for God; and her radical blueprint for the post-war reconstruction of France, The Need for Roots.

PHIL 77600  Critical Philosophy of Race
Prof. Charles Mills Mondays 6:30pm- 8:30pm
Race, once a marginal subject in philosophy (excluding, that is, the racist writings of many of the classical figures of the modern canon), has become increasingly respectable in recent years. Critical philosophers of race have produced a growing and exciting body of work in such areas as metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, aesthetics, phenomenology and existentialism, and the rewriting of the history of philosophy itself. This course will provide an overview and guide to some of this literature, and its implications for the teaching of the traditional canon.

PHIL 77900  Ideology and Propaganda
Prof. Graham Priest Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
This course is about ideology, what it is and how it functions, the techniques of propaganda that can be used to promote it, and how these might be resisted. We will start by looking at some of early texts: Marx, Gramsci, Mannheim. Then we will look at Edward Bernay’s classic on the manipulation of mass opinion, Propaganda. Next, we will turn to Sandra Bartkey’s Femininity and Domination, on ideology and patriarchy, and Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed, on education and oppression. Finally, we will look at Noam Chomsky’s Manufacturing Consent and Jason Stanley’s How Propaganda Works.

PHIL 77700  Aesthetic Psychology
Prof. Jesse Prinz Tuesdays 9:30am-11:30am

PSC 72000  American Politics: Theories and Core Concepts
Prof. Brian Arbour Mondays 6:30pm-8:30pm
This seminar surveys the major scholarly debates in the study of American politics today. It draws on prominent theoretical perspectives for understanding empirical issues regarding: (1) the history of American political development; (2) the constitutional and institutional structure of American government in its contemporary form; (3) the structure of power and the behavior of political elites; and (4) ordinary people’s political behavior as manifested in studies of public opinion and political participation broadly construed. As a seminar, the course emphasizes dialogue about assigned readings. Students are to be active participants in the conversation. The course is designed to help students prepare for the doctoral exam in American politics and to acquire the background to teach American politics at the undergraduate level. The course will regularly address issues in contemporary American politics and how the literature on American politics addresses these issues.

PSC 87800  Politics of Identity
Prof. Julie George Thursdays 2:00pm-4:00pm
Identity helps shape how people understand their interests, how they interpret the world around them, and how they interact with power. Likewise, governments and societies interact with identity groups variously, often constructing hierarchies that either open or limit outcomes and opportunities. This class investigates the politics of identity and identity salience. It highlights the main theoretical frameworks that have come to dominate the scholarly discourse, focusing particularly on the politics of ethnicity, nationalism, race, and religion.
The course will take a geographically comparative approach, closely examining identity politics in Eurasia, Africa, South Asia, and Latin America. Students will also have an opportunity to read on areas of their own geographical or identity interest. The course will have a paper component and focus on research design components that underpin scholarly inquiry. In engaging the readings, we will pay attention to the arguments and findings therein, but also in the underlying structures of the study, the evidence considered, and the effectiveness of the choices made by the author. We will likewise engage with literature of varied methodologies. Students will write a research paper during the course, as well as short reading analyses. Students will read an equivalent of a book a week and will lead the discussions.


PSC 71902  Authoritarian National Populism and the Crisis of Democracy
Prof. Richard Wolin Mondays 6:30pm-8:30pm
With communism’s unexpected demise in 1989, optimistic forecasts concerning the worldwide triumph of democracy proliferated. During the 1980s and 1990s, authoritarian regimes unraveled not only in Europe, but also in Asia, Latin America, and South Africa, spurring hopes that a long overdue “Third Wave” of democratization was underway.
Recently, it has become painfully evident just how premature and naïve these prognoses were. Over the last ten years, instead of the triumph of liberal democracy, we have witnessed the global ascendancy of authoritarian national populism.
In part, these developments signify a defensive response to the depredations of globalization and neoliberalism. But they also represent a rejoinder to problems that, historically, have been endemic to modern democracy – problems such as: (1) how to determine who counts as part of the demos (women? those without property? religious and ethnic minorities?); and (2) which institutional mechanisms ensure that that the “will of the people” is adequately reflected by the representatives who purportedly govern in its name.
Today, the disturbing rise of political authoritarianism and ethnic nationalism reflects diminished confidence in the capacity of parliamentary democracy to remedy the acute social disequilibrium – economic, cultural, and political – intrinsic to political liberalism. Our approach to these problems will be threefold: (1) historical, (2) theoretical, and (3) political. Among the noteworthy theorists of political authoritarianism that we will discuss are: Hannah Arendt, Carl Schmitt, and leading representatives of the Frankfurt School (T. W. Adorno, Herbert Marcuse, etc.)

PSC 80304  Perspectives on Modernity
Prof. Uday Mehta Mondays 2:00pm-4:00pm
This seminar will consider several accounts of what constitutes modernity, along with the hopes and challenges associated with it. It will draw on thinkers such as Kant, Hegel, Marx and J.S. Mill and others who challenged the technological, economic and broadly progressive and optimistic accounts given in favor of modernity. As part of this latter group the seminar will consider the writings of various religious thinkers and others who had a more skeptical understanding of modernity. The seminar will conclude with a consideration of contemporary thinkers with a special focus on issues relating to democracy and the environment. The readings for the seminar will draw on the writings of both western and non-western thinkers.

PSC 80609  Race, Nation & Narrative
Prof. George Shulman Thursdays 2:00pm-4:00pm
This course uses social analysis, political speeches, and artistic fictions to explore the relation of race making, nation building, and narrating in the case of the United States. Our broadest premise is that collective subjects (nations, peoples, classes, religions, races) are formed and reformed through narratives joined to collective action. Our specific premise is that “American nationhood has been formed by racial domination and opposition to it, as represented in and through contesting narratives.” The first half of the semester therefore uses social theory to explore the intersections of settler colonialism, chattel slavery, and immigration restriction -and of social movements and counter-narratives opposing them- in shaping imagined (national) community and conceptions of democracy.
The second half of the course attends to and explores idioms of critique: what difference does it make to contest racialized nationalism by a scholarly treatise, by a political speech, or by a work of literary or cinematic fiction? What can and cannot be said (and thereby done) through these different genres of expression? How do we assess the rhetorical and literary dimensions of theoretical texts and how might we discern the theoretical implications of literary and cinematic fictions? Texts of theory include Michael Rogin, Glenn Coulthard, Mae Ngai, Loic Waquant, Hortense Spillers, Saidiyah Hartman, Frank Wilderson, Fred Moton. Authors include James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, Claudia Rankine; Films include Bamboozled, GET OUT, and Black Panther.

PSC 71908  Machiavelli
Prof. Benedetto Fontana Thursdays 6:30pm-8:30pm
This course focuses on Machiavelli and his interpreters.  Machiavelli is one of the most contentious and protean thinkers in the history of Western political thought. That he has had, and continues to have, a broad and profound influence on political thought cannot be denied. He has been called teacher of evil, a founder of modernity, partisan of republican government, defender of tyranny, defender of the liberty and equality of the people (the many), discoverer of the autonomy of politics and of a new science of politics, amoral realist, impassioned idealist and ardent patriot. In his thought and action he combines simultaneously ferocity and cold calculation. It seems that one cannot discuss politics without confronting and coming to terms with his thought.
The course will examine different interpretations, or different ways of reading, Machiavelli-—such as reason of state, republican, democratic, Straussian, feminist, rhetorical and revolutionary. What is striking about Machiavelli is his complexity—-of ideas, levels of historical reflection, motivations, methods and style. Benedetto Croce long ago observed that Machiavelli is an enigma that can never be resolved, and his resistance to simple categorization makes him perennially open to controversy and reinterpretation. The course explores the various stands of the densely textured web that is his thought. In effect, it offers a reading of several of Machiavelli’s writings, and at the same time looks at the various approaches to, and interpretations of, his politics and thought.
The major political works and some of the minor writings will be read. The former are: The Prince, the Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius, and the Art of War. The latter are: The Life of Castruccio Castracani, A Provision for Infantry, Tercets on Ambition and On Fortune, A Pastoral: the Ideal Ruler, An Exhortation to Penitence, Description of the Method Used by Duke Valentino in Killing, Discourse on Remodeling the Government of Florence. The critically trenchant comedy Mandragola will also be read.
Course requirements: One take-home final examination and one paper on a subject chosen by the student, both due at the end of the semester.

PSC 80605  Social Ontology: Between Theory and Practice
Prof. Carol Gould Tuesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm
Does a social or political collective exist over and above the individuals who comprise it? Are individuals constituted by their social relations or are they free to choose the relations they have with other people? What are collective intentions and actions? Are gender and sex socially constructed or are they natural kinds? And do the answers to these questions have important normative implications for contemporary politics? These and related questions arise at the intersection of metaphysics and political theory and have garnered interest in both Anglo-American and Continental traditions of thought. It can be suggested, too, that social and political theories operate (however tacitly) with conceptions of the entities that make up social reality—of the nature of individuals and of their relations, where these conceptions range from radically individualistic to fully holistic ones of a community or body politic within which individuals gain their identities. Moreover, philosophical theories themselves, however abstract, may reflect ways of thinking rooted in forms of practical life, which in turn delimit their universality or reach. These various issues form the core of the project of social ontology.
This seminar will begin by analyzing this project as it emerges in the work of Hegel, Marx and Lukacs, and as it has developed in contemporary analytic theories such as those of Margaret Gilbert and Michael Bratman. It will consider notions of alterity, plurality, and the second-person perspective in Simone de Beauvoir, Emmanuel Levinas, Hannah Arendt, and Stephen Darwall, and will take up feminist relational ontologies and care approaches (e.g., in Seyla Benhabib and Virginia Held). The course will then focus on key topics in social ontology, including collective intentionality (Raimo Tuomela and the Bratman-Gilbert debate), the nature of institutions (John Searle, Steven Lukes), and of structures (Anthony Giddens and Sally Haslanger), moving to the ontology of groups in both continental and analytic frames (Jean-Paul Sartre, Iris Young, and Philip Pettit). The seminar will then consider some of the normative and practical implications of social ontological perspectives, including the vexed question of collective responsibility (e.g., Larry May), the metaphysics of sex and gender (Carol Gould, Asta Sveinsdottir), the ontology of race (Anthony Appiah, Philip Kitcher, and Charles Mills), and finally, feminist notions of relational autonomy and intersectional group identities and their import for understanding contemporary social and political life (Jennifer Nedelsky and Diana Meyers, among others). Seminar members will be encouraged to relate the course materials to their ongoing research projects through oral presentations and analytical term papers, and will be expected to be active participants in the seminar discussions.

PSYC 80103 Critical Methods in Contentious Times 
Prof. Michelle Fine

With a transdiscipliniary commitment to decolonizing methodologies, "public science" and participatory policy work, the course readings include critical scholarship on epistemology, methodology and ethics, moving between quantitative, qualitative, visual, performative and auto-ethnographic methods. The arc of the course commits to a deep interrogation of critical classic texts (e.g. The Philadelphia Negro and Marienthal) as well as a contemporary "assemblage" of social science methodologies that center questions of power and possibility, particularly participatory policy projects hatched between university and community. The course has been designed for students in psychology, geography, sociology, urban education, public health and social welfare.
 
SOC 74600  Political Economy & Social Change
Prof. Roslyn Bologh Mondays 6:30pm-8:30pm
How do the dynamics and relations of political economy affect social life, and how can they be changed?  From interpersonal relations to international relations, from rankings of happiness among countries and among migrants within countries to rates of suicide, from race and ethnic relations and inequalities to gender relations, from interpersonal violence to international violence, from militarization of policing to privatization of prisons and mass incarceration, from types of education to urban and suburban life, from Manhattan rents and real estate prices to segregation, political economy is shaping social life.
Part of the appeal of Thomas Piketty’s acclaimed book on inequality, Capital in the Twenty First Century, lies in his emphatic rejection of the narrow economistic approach of economics and his espousal of the more comprehensive, sociological, cultural and historical perspective of political economy  – employing sources as unorthodox as Jane Austen’s novels. We will examine theorists from Marx to the critical theorists of today in order to understand the dynamics and direction of our changing world.  Students (even beginning graduate students) will be encouraged to develop a draft of a publishable article.

SOC 86800  Cultural Sociology
Prof. James Jasper Thursdays 2:00pm-4:00 pm
This course will examine the construction of meaning across many social institutions, taking culture as an aspect of all social life; it is not a course about the production of art and literature. We will read mostly theory, but many of the arenas we examine will be political. The “argument” of the course will be that we cannot understand meaning without understanding emotions.

SOC 70100  Development of Sociological Theory
Prof. Julia Wrigley Tuesdays 4:15pm-6:15pm
In this course we will read and discuss the works of the classical theorists, including, particularly, Marx, Durkheim, Weber, DuBois, and Wollstonecraft to discern their theoretical insights and also to understand how and why they became shapers of our field, with their work still influencing contemporary sociologists generations later. We will explore their distinctive ideas about power, unity, and division within societies and how societies change and will also consider the intellectual and historical context in which they developed their work. We will read some contemporary works that draw upon their ideas.
We will proceed through reading and discussion. To foster lively and informed discussion, each week you will be asked to prepare a question about the readings. The questions will be distributed before the class to stimulate thought in advance.

SOC 73200  Global Feminism
Prof. Hester Eisenstein Mondays 2:00pm-4:00pm
In this course we will take a look at what has come to be known as global feminism.  Feminism usually refers to the movement by women for full citizenship, in the wake of the strict gender rules inherited from the Victorian era in western countries.  In the United States, the “first wave” from 1848 to the 1880s and 1890s eventually produced the right to vote in 1920; labor feminism in the 1930s and 1940s expanded work roles for women and developed concepts such as sexual harassment and maternity leave; and the “second wave” expanded the agenda for women’s rights to include reproductive self-determination, sexual choice, access to all areas of paid work, and a common sense notion that the similarities between women and men vastly outweigh the differences attributable to biology.  In the wake of the globalization of the world economy since the 1970s, a highly visible form of feminism has emerged in the form of state or official feminism: “femocrats” emerged from Australia and entered governments throughout the world, and a fairly standard ideology of women’s rights has been developed which preaches equality for women, access to capitalist work and markets, and a critique of patriarchal cultures.  But is this global feminism what women all over the world really want and need?  We will take a look at this series of debates, reading texts by Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Valentine Moghadam, Sara Farris, Tithi Battacharya, among others.

SOC 82800  Sociology of Knowledge and Science
Prof. John Torpey Tuesdays 2:00pm-4:00pm
This course examines the development of the sociology of knowledge and science from its nineteenth-century origins to the present day.  It seeks to convey a) an understanding of the ways in which knowledge has been grasped in sociological terms and b) the ways in which science and knowledge have affected social life in the past two centuries or so.