GC & City Tech Receive $324K NEH Digital Humanities Grant

The Graduate Center (GC) and New York City College of Technology (City Tech) have been awarded a $324,502 Digital Humanities Implementation Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ (NEH) Office of Digital Humanities for "Learning in the Public Square: An Open Platform for Humanities Education."
 
The two-year project will help transform Commons In A Box (CBOX) into an extensible teaching and learning platform, modeled on the City Tech OpenLab and incorporating widely-used digital humanities tools, that can be used in the classroom to provide a powerful free and open-source alternative to proprietary learning management systems.
 
CBOX is a free software project developed by the team behind the CUNY Academic Commons, an academic network for the 24-campus CUNY system, that simplifies the process of making a commons site where members can discuss issues, collaborate, and share their work. Funded initially by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, CBOX is used by academic institutions, scholarly associations, and non-profit organizations to foster community among their members.
 
The project also builds on the success of City Tech’s OpenLab, an open platform for teaching, learning, and collaboration with over 17,000 members who can work together across the college and the disciplines, sharing their work with one another and the world.
 
Key institutional and private partners, such as the GC’s Teaching and Learning Center, the GC Digital Initiatives, and Reclaim Hosting will advise and participate in the project’s development. Testing partners include faculty and staff from educational institutions across the country: SUNY Geneseo, the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, the Futures Initiative at CUNY, Lane Community College and the DH at Community Colleges Consortium, and the San Diego Regional DH Consortium.
 
The new platform will incorporate software developed by digital humanities practitioners for scholarly communication, such as Anthologize, Braille, DiRT Tools, and Social Paper, putting these tools and their benefits for learning within reach of teachers and students at any institution.
 
“This project reaffirms the value of one of the GC’s major digital humanities tools, CBOX, and reinforces the GC’s focus on digital pedagogy,” said Project Director and Professor Matthew K. Gold (English/Digital Humanities), assistant to the provost for Digital Initiatives and executive officer of the M.A. Program in Liberal Studies.

"The grant will result in a new version of CBOX that institutions can use to help their faculty members and students build dynamic, creatively designed course spaces that enable students to connect their learning across classes, building bridges between the humanities and other disciplines, and aiding educators in a variety of institutional settings.”

*Matthew Gold photo: Da Ping Luo

Submitted on: AUG 11, 2016

Category: Faculty Activities | General GC News | Graduate Center Digital Initiatives