Show The Graduate Center Menu
 
 

Handbook

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY CENTER
THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

Ph.D. Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages

(Revised July 2011)

 

This Handbook supplements the current Bulletin of the Graduate Center and University Center, the current Student Handbook, and the Announcement of Courses. All policies and requirements described in this Handbook apply to all students in the Ph.D. Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages and are effective immediately. Request for exemption from any requirement must be made in writing to the Executive Officer of the program.

This Handbook will be revised periodically to incorporate changes made in program policy. Proposals for policy change by students or faculty should be submitted in writing to the appropriate committee for discussion. Approval or disapproval of policy change is determined by a majority vote of the members of the Executive Committee.

Students are responsible for informing themselves about the program policies and requirements contained in this Handbook. It is advised that students ask periodically at the Program Office for the most recent issue of the Handbook describing the latest changes that have been made.



TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. General Information

II. Financial Aid

III. General Orientation

IV. Advising System

V. Transfer of Credits

VI. Program of Study

VII. Language requirement

VIII. First examination

IX. First examination - failures

X. Second examination

XI. Second examination – failures

XII. Courses

XIII. Master's degree en route

XIV. Incomplete grades

XV. Dissertation

XVI. Leave of Absence and Maintaining Matriculation

XVII. Student Representatives

XVIII. Committees

 

I. GENERAL INFORMATION

a. The Program

Our program is part of The Graduate Center, a unique institution devoted primarily to doctoral studies. The Graduate Center is committed to original and innovative research and offers a vibrant program of public events that, as its mission statement indicates, "draws upon and contributes to the complex communities of New York City and beyond." We in HLBLL are major contributors to our institutional mission. Our outstanding faculty specializes in a vast range of geographical areas, historical periods, and theoretical approaches to Iberian and Latin American literature and language studies. We are committed to preparing our students to become rigorous and creative scholars in a diverse spectrum of fields of inquiry. A series of core courses provide students with the training necessary to pursue research in literature and language, and seminars – covering a wide range of geographical areas in both the lusophone and Spanish-speaking world – allow them to specialize in areas including intellectual, literary, and linguistic history; literary theory, bibliographical studies, and theories of textual criticism; philology, poetics, and rhetoric; women's writing, gay and lesbian studies, and feminist theory; film and visual culture; sociolinguistics and the politics of language.

b. Resources for Training and Research

Most students in the Program have the opportunity to teach undergraduate Spanish language courses as Graduate Teaching Fellows or Adjunct Lecturers in the various Senior and Community Colleges of the City University of New York. Teaching is supervised and monitored in the language department of each campus. Students are urged to take advantage of the various programs, special sessions, and workshops organized by the CUNY consortium and the CUNY Council on Foreign Language Study (the LOTE Discipline Council of The City University of New York).


Students in the Program take full advantage of the vast resources provided by the research facilities of both CUNY's library system and the public and private libraries of New York City. Students can borrow and return books at any CUNY college. In addition to the Mina Rees Library at The Graduate Center and the significant collection of books (over six million) and journals in the libraries of the senior colleges, they also have access to the holdings of the library of the Instituto Cervantes, located at 211 East 49th Street, The New York Public Library, the Morgan Library, and The Hispanic Society of America, a unique private institution that for its rich collection of manuscripts, incunabula, and rare books can be compared only to the best National Libraries and Historical Archives of Spain. Many students in the program whose dissertations deal with Spanish Medieval, Early Modern, Modern and Contemporary Literature, or with Colonial Latin American subjects work with materials housed in The Hispanic Society that are not available anywhere else.

c. Program and Student Activities

Throughout the academic year, the program sponsors colloquia, symposia and lecture series that bring to The Graduate Center internationally recognized scholars, writers and artists from the

United States, Europe, and Latin America. Other cultural activities are co-sponsored with Instituto Cervantes, Instituto de Cultura Mexicana, The General Consulate of Spain in New York, The Consulate of Argentina, the University of Valladolid, and other doctoral programs at The Graduate Center, such as French, Comparative Literature, and certificate programs such as Renaissance Studies, Latin American Studies and the Foundation for Iberian Music.

Over the years, our program has signed numerous collaboration agreements with foreign institutions. The Center for Galician Studies, established in 1985 as an agreement with the Xunta de Galicia´s Secretaría Xeral de Política Lingüística, has allowed some of our students to study in Santiago de Compostela and to take seminars in our program on Galician culture and linguistic issues. In 2003 we signed an agreement with the Junta de Castilla y León and the University of Valladolid for the creation of the Miguel Delibes Chair to promote the study of contemporary Spanish literature and culture. This chair supports the publication of an academic journal, SIGLO XXI. Literatura y cultura españolas, co-edited by specialists of both institutions. Other agreements have been signed with Institut Ramon Llull for the creation of the Mercè Rodoreda Chair, which sponsors a yearly seminar in Catalan literature and linguistics, and some cultural activities, as well as with the Argentine Consulate-Banco Hipotecario, for the establishment of the Argentine Culture Chair, which also allows us to offer a yearly seminar on Argentine literary and historical topics. Yet other agreements have been signed with Portugal´s Camões Institute to promote the teaching of Portuguese Literature and with the Basque Country´s Etxepare Institute to create the Bernardo Atxaga Chair in Basque Literature and Language. Our Program has also signed agreements with the Fundación Duques de Soria and the Hispanic Society of America for the development of a series of special seminars in textual criticism, which started in the Fall of 2002.

Students in the Program organize a yearly International Student Congress at the Graduate Center. These meetings have attracted doctoral students from American as well as European and Latin American universities. Their published Proceedings give proof of the quality of our student's work, and of the variety of scholarly interests that characterize them. Since the year 2006 our students also edit the electronic LL Journal, in which important articles on Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian literatures, cultures and linguistics have been published. This refereed journal, which is listed in the MLA bibliography and the Library of Congress, has been highly praised for the quality of the articles accepted for publication, which explains its successful reception in this country and abroad.

II. FINANCIAL AID

Financial assistance is available to full-time students enrolled in the Program. It comes in the form of fellowships (both service-connected and non-service-connected), assistantships, tuition fellowships, loans, and college work study assignments. Awards are granted on the basis of merit and need. For more information go to http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Prospective-Current-Students/New-Current-Students/Financial-Assistance.

III. GENERAL ORIENTATION

a. At the beginning of each academic year new students attend an orientation session with the EO, a librarian, and HLBLL´s student representatives.

b. Each year students will receive an information sheet concerning all members of the doctoral faculty. Where appropriate and possible, the information sheet will contain:

1. Office hours, office number, and telephone extension at The Graduate Center.
2. Teaching schedule at The Graduate Center.
3. Telephone number of the college office and office hours there.

IV. ADVISING SYSTEM

a. The Executive Officer and the Deputy Executive Officer will serve as advisers to all students until they begin preparation of the second exam.

b. Students are encouraged to maintain regular contact with their advisers. There should be at least one consultation conference between student and adviser per semester.

c. All student records will be available to the adviser upon request.

d. At the end of each year, a student's record will be reviewed by the Executive Officer to determine the student's progress.

V. TRANSFER OF CREDITS


Transfer students must file a written request within the first year at The Graduate Center to the Executive Officer, specifying those courses for which they wish to transfer credit. They must include all supporting material such as transcripts, course descriptions, material covered in class, works read for course, term papers, etc. The Executive Officer will make the appropriate recommendation to the Registrar within two months of receipt of application and the student will be notified.

VI. PROGRAM OF STUDY


a. Literature track: A minimum of 60 credits beyond the bachelor's degree are required for the Ph.D. The first 30 credits must include at least 21 credits in Peninsular and Latin American Literatures. The second 30 credits must include a minimum of four doctoral seminars at the 80000 level. It is advised that the students take an equal number of seminars in Peninsular and Latin American Literatures. All students in the literature track must take at least one course in either Portuguese or Brazilian Literature.

b. Required Courses
1. SPAN. 70100 - History of the Language
It must be taken by the completion of 45 credits.
2. SPAN. 70200 - Literary Theory
It is required as part of the first 30 credits.
3. SPAN. 70300 - Introduction to Methods of Research
It is required as part of the first 30 credits.

c. Linguistics track: A minimum of 60 credits beyond the bachelor's degree are required for the Ph.D. The first 36 credits must include the required core courses (see below). The remaining credits must include a minimum of three doctoral seminars at the advanced level (two of these three seminars must be in Hispanic linguistics), and at least one course in Hispanic literatures. All courses taken outside the program must be approved by the Executive Officer or her/his appointed program adviser.

d. Required Courses
1. SPAN 70100 – History of the Spanish Language
2. SPAN 70600 - Fundamentals of Hispanic Linguistics
3. SPAN 70700 – Spanish Applied Linguistics
4. SPAN 72900 – Spanish in Social Context

VII. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT

a. Literature track: two languages are required: Latin and either French, German, Italian or Portuguese (only for students in Peninsular or Latin American literatures). Any other language with a significant body of critical studies in Peninsular and/or Latin American Literature may be approved by the Executive Officer.

b. Linguistics track: any two of the following languages are required: French, German, Italian, Latin, or Portuguese. Any other language with a significant literature in Hispanic linguistics or relevance to the student's doctoral work may be approved by the Executive Officer.

c. To fulfill this language requirement, students may either:

1. Pass (each semester with a B or better) a two-semester course given at any of CUNY's senior colleges.
2. Pass (with a B or better) the reading knowledge Level One course offered by The Graduate Center Language Reading Program or the corresponding intensive course offered during the summer.
3. Pass the Translation Examination given once every semester by the Ph.D. Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages.

d. The Executive Officer may exempt a student from the language requirement if the student admitted to the program with a master's degree from one of the senior colleges of the City University of New York or any other comparable institution has already passed a language examination as part of the requirement for his/her master's degree. Only students who have passed a language examination within the previous five years can request the exemption.

VIII. FIRST EXAMINATION

a. For students enrolled in the literature track: Before completing more than 45 credits, students will be required to pass a written examination to determine their capability to pursue advanced doctoral studies. The First Examination, to be given in Spanish, will test the student's critical ability to analyze selected major works of different periods in the fields of Peninsular and Latin American Literature. Students must bear in mind that questions on literary criticism are an integral part of the examination.

The Annual Examination Committee designated to make up, administer, and evaluate the First Examination will generally consist of eight members of the faculty ( four in Peninsular Literature and  four in Latin American Literature) including the Executive Officer or his/her designee. The  eight professors will be appointed annually by the Executive Officer.

A list of  16 works (8  in Peninsular and 8 in Latin American Literature) selected by the Annual Examination Committee will be posted on the Program’s web page and made available at the office of the Executive Officer no later than  five months before the date set for the examination. Each literary text will be accompanied by a critical bibliography (5-7 titles, books or articles).

The examination will consist of two parts: 1) Peninsular Literature and 2) Latin American Literature, to be given on two separate days. Each part will last six hours and will be distributed in the following manner: three hours in the morning and three hours in the afternoon.

The examination in Peninsular Literature will be divided into four sections:
1) Medieval
2) Renaissance and Baroque
3) Eighteenth Century and Nineteenth Century
4) Twentieth and Twenty First Century

Latin American Literature will be divided into four sections:
1) Colonial 
2) Nineteenth Century
3) From Modernismo to the Avant-garde
4) Twenty and Twenty First Century

For each area the student will answer 1 (one) question based on one of the two texts included on the reading list.

b. For students enrolled in the Hispanic linguistics track: The First Examination will test the students' knowledge of the facts, concepts, principles, and theoretical frameworks that define each of the disciplines studied, and their ability to write coherent essays that are relevant to the main questions addressed by those same disciplines. The First Examination will cover the four areas of Spanish syntax, phonology, sociolinguistics and historical linguistics and will be based on coursework and a core list of required readings. On each area-examination the student will answer 5 out of 7 short questions and write 1 essay on 1 out of 2 given topics.

c. The First Examination will be given generally the week before the beginning of each semester. In order to be able to take the examination students MUST be registered.

Students will be notified of the results of the examination in writing within two weeks.
No student with incompletes and/or less than a B average will be permitted to take the First Examination.
Students entering with a bachelor's degree must take the First Examination no later than their fourth semester of study. Students entering with a master's degree must take the examination no later than their second semester.

IX. FIRST EXAMINATION – FAILURES

a. A student who fails either or both parts of the First Examination or a section of either part (Peninsular and/or Latin American Literature) must repeat the part(s)/section(s) the following semester; failure to do so may result in dismissal from the program.

b. A student who fails either or both parts of the First Examination a second time will be dismissed from the program. (See the Student Handbook for appeal procedures.)

X. SECOND EXAMINATION

a. After completing a minimum of 60 credits and fulfilling all other requirements, students must pass a second written examination in Spanish. In order to take the examination students MUST be registered.

b. The Second Examination for students in the literature track will revolve around four areas:

Primary Area: it will be selected from one of the eight major areas listed above. The examination will be based on a reading list of at least 25 books. The reading lists for all eight major areas are available at the office of the Executive Officer. This area will embrace all genres.

Secondary Area: it will be selected from the eight major areas listed above and should relate coherently to the primary and concentration areas. The examination will be based on a reading list of at least 25 books. The reading lists for all eight major areas are available at the office of the Executive Officer. This area will embrace all genres.

Concentration Area: it should be closely related to the major area and selected according to each student's research interests. This area may be defined by genre, movement, or topic, and must incorporate a unifying critical or theoretical perspective. The examination will be based on a list of at least 25 books or an equivalent number of texts to be selected by the student and the Chair of the Examination Committee. There can be no overlap between the readings included in the primary/secondary area lists and those included in the concentration area list.

Critical/Theoretical area: it must relate coherently to the other areas. The examination will be based on a list of at least 25 books or an equivalent number of texts to be selected by the student and the Chair of the Examination Committee.

Each student's Examination Committee will consist of three faculty members appointed by the Executive Officer in consultation with the student. Ultimately, approval of the areas selected and reading lists will rest on each student's Examination Committee.

The second examination will consist of a traditional in-class exam (based on the reading lists for the Primary and Secondary areas) and a take-home exam (based on the reading lists for the Concentration and Critical-Theoretical Fields). The IN-CLASS exam will be taken on a Friday, typically one week before the beginning of each semester. In the morning, students will answer 2 out of 4 questions on one of the two areas (Primary or Secondary) (3 hours); in the afternoon, they will answer 2 out of 4 questions on the remaining area (3 hours). On the same Friday, students will be given two essay questions based on the reading lists for the Concentration and Critical-Theoretical areas. The student will select one and write, over the weekend, an essay of approximately 3500 words (not including the list of cited works that must be presented at the end of the essay). The student will personally hand-deliver the essay by the following Monday at 2:00 pm.

c. The Second Examination for students in Hispanic linguistics track: After completing a minimum of 60 credits and fulfilling all requirements, students must pass a Second Examination. For each student, the Executive Officer will appoint a committee of three professors including the student's mentor, who will serve as chair. The examination will have a written and an oral component. In consultation with the committee, each student must designate and describe a primary and a secondary area of concentration. For the secondary area, students will prepare an annotated bibliography. For the primary area, in addition to preparing an annotated bibliography, they will select a topic, and write a paper. The paper must have approximately 8000 words and demonstrate the student's command of the field and ability to write publishable articles. Bibliographies and paper must be handed to all committee members before the designated Second Examination date. The oral exam will consist of a presentation by the student followed by questions from committee members.

d. The Second Examination will be given generally the week before the beginning of each semester.

Students will be notified of the results of the examination in writing within two weeks.
No student with incompletes and/or less than a B average will be permitted to take the Second Examination.
Students will be advanced to candidacy after passing the Second Examination.

XI. SECOND EXAMINATION – FAILURES

a. A student who fails either or both parts of the Second Examination or a section of either part (Peninsular and/or Latin American Literature) must repeat the part(s)/sections(s) within a year's time; failure to do so may result in dismissal from the program.

b. A student who fails either or both parts of the Second Examination a second time will be dismissed from the program. (See the Student Handbook for appeal procedures.)

XII. COURSES

The final decision on course offerings rests with the Executive Officer.

The program offers 70000-level courses (planned to provide students with a general view of a field or period) and 80000-level seminars (with focus on more specialized topics). In the event that a particular course is not offered at The Graduate Center, the student will be allowed to take an equivalent course at another institution within the Interuniversity Doctoral Consortium with the consent of the Executive Officer, the Vice President of Student Affairs at The Graduate Center and the divisional Dean at the host institution. Students are entitled to take a maximum of nine credits outside HLBLL with the consent of the Executive Officer

Course descriptions and lists of texts should be presented by faculty to the Executive Officer before the beginning of each semester for copying and distribution to students. Reference syllabi and bibliographies will be on file for courses previously offered. This material will be available to all students upon request.

Full-time students must register for a minimum of seven credits; students may register for a maximum of four courses each semester until their course work is completed. Exceptions may be made at the discretion of the Executive Officer.

XIII. MASTER'S DEGREE "EN ROUTE"

The en-route master's degree is awarded by a senior college to currently enrolled doctoral students who have fulfilled the following requirement: a minimum of 45 GPA credits with an average grade of "B" (courses taken for "P" credit ordinarily cannot be included), passing of the First Examination, satisfactory completion of a major research paper (50 pages), and any other requirements that may be established by the degree-granting college for an en-route master's degree. Applying students must abide by the deadline for filing established at each college. Further information may be obtained from the Registrar at the Graduate Center.

XIV. INCOMPLETE GRADES

a. The general regulation regarding incomplete grades as stated in the Student Handbook will be observed: "To resolve incomplete grades, students must fulfill their obligations within one calendar year after completion of the course. After one year an incomplete (INC) will be automatically transformed into an INP (permanent incomplete); extensions will be granted only in exceptional circumstances upon written application and with the permission of the faculty member, the Executive Officer, and the Vice President for Student Affairs. Permanent incompletes will accrue no credit. Incomplete grades cannot be changed to letter grades after a student has been advanced to candidacy and has been moved to Level III. Students with more than two incompletes will be brought to the attention of the Executive Officer who will determine whether they are making satisfactory progress. Students will not normally be regarded as making satisfactory progress toward their degrees if they have more than two INCs on their record" (p.65). (See the Student Handbook, p. 65, for more information on incomplete grades and standards for retention).

b. Once a student has fulfilled the requirements to remove a grade of Incomplete the professor should file the grade within that semester.

c. It is strongly recommended that students with two incomplete grades during one semester register for no more than two courses in the following semester. Those with more than two incompletes may not be permitted to register for any courses in the following semester.

XV. DISSERTATION

a. Dissertation Guidelines


1. Within one semester after passing the Second Examination, the candidate must submit in writing to the Executive Officer for approval his/her dissertation topic, the name of the dissertation director, and the two readers of his/her Dissertation Committee.

2. Within one year after passing the Second Examination, the candidate must submit a dissertation proposal to the Dissertation Committee for approval. The double-spaced written proposal, of at least 5-7 pages, must include a description of the topic, the methodology to be employed, the scholarly significance, the contribution to the field, and the feasibility of the project. A basic up-to-date bibliography of the topic following recent MLA guidelines will also be required. The proposal should be dated and signed by the dissertation director.

3. After writing the dissertation proposal, the candidate shall make an oral presentation of the written proposal before the Dissertation Committee for approval.

4. After the candidate's presentation and discussion of his or her dissertation proposal, the Dissertation Committee shall write a report to the Executive Officer stating the reason for the approval or rejection of the proposal. The Executive Officer will present the report to the Executive Committee.

5. During the period in which the candidate is completing the dissertation, no other candidate in the Ph.D. Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages at CUNY will be assigned the same topic. Should it come to light that a dissertation on the same subject has been completed in another university before the candidate has finished his/her own work, the Dissertation Committee will determine whether the candidates dissertation will still be making a sufficient contribution to the study of the selected topic to warrant its continuation.

6. Upon completion of the dissertation and after approval by the Dissertation Committee, the candidate shall defend the dissertation in a public oral examination in Spanish.

7. The candidate's oral defense will consist of a presentation on the nature of the research and the results it has yielded, followed by a question period normally of one-hour duration. A majority vote of the Dissertation Committee will be required for the approval of the dissertation.

b. Dissertation Committee


1. The Dissertation Committee consists of the dissertation director and at least two readers. The members of the committee are usually members of the programs doctoral faculty. A student, in consultation with the Executive Officer and the dissertation director, may request a third reader who is not a member of the programs faculty. This reader should be either a member of the CUNY doctoral faculty or from the faculty of an accredited institution of higher learning who is a recognized authority in the area of the candidate's specialization.

2. In the event that the dissertation director or one or both readers must be changed, the Executive Officer will meet with the director and/or the reader as well as the student to discuss the changes.

c. Dissertation Progress

1. In the event that the candidate is not making satisfactory progress, the dissertation director will report to the Executive Officer, who may either request that the candidate change the dissertation topic or drop the student from the program if the time limit has expired (16 terms).

2. The Executive Officer may grant an extension beyond the time limit to a candidate whose work is well advanced.

3. After the dissertation director has advised the candidate of needed revisions in each chapter, the candidate will submit a legible draft of the dissertation to the director for approval. It will then be submitted to the second and third readers who will advise the student in writing of suggestions, reservations, and serious objections they may have regarding the work. The candidate and the dissertation director will then decide, before undertaking the final draft of the dissertation, how much of it should be altered to conform to the suggestions of the second and third readers.

4. Upon approval of the members of the candidate's Dissertation Committee, the final draft of the dissertation will be prepared, and three copies will be submitted to the Dissertation Committee.

5. A date for the oral defense of the dissertation will be selected by the student in agreement with the Dissertation Committee, allowing at least a period of four weeks during which copies of the dissertation will be available for interested members of the doctoral faculty and students in the Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages Program.


d. Students are to request a copy of the Instructions for Preparing the Doctoral Dissertation, available in the Ph.D. Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages and in the Registrar's Office.

XVI. LEAVE OF ABSENCE AND MAINTAINING MATRICULATION

a. A student may request in writing to the Executive Officer a leave of absence for a maximum of one year. The Executive Officer will submit it for approval to the Office of the Registrar.

b. Requests for either an extension beyond the one-year period or a second leave should be presented in writing to the Executive Officer, who will submit it for approval to the Office of the Registrar. Students are allowed a maximum of 4 semesters of leave of absence.

c. A student on leave of absence is not entitled to the use of the library or any other Graduate Center facility.

d. The period of an authorized leave is not included within the time limit for completion of degree requirements.

e. A student who is not registered for courses and is not on an approved leave must pay the maintenance of matriculation fee as stipulated in the Bulletin or be withdrawn from the program.

f. The student is reminded that a semester in which matriculation is maintained will be included within the time limit for completion of the degree.

XVII. STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES

a. Students will be elected to serve as representatives to the Executive Committee, the Faculty Committee, the Curriculum Committee, the Admissions Committee, the Doctoral Students Council, and the Graduate Council.


b. All student representatives must have a serious and diligent attitude toward their role and are expected to represent the view of students even when these contradict their own.

c. All student representatives must be candidates in good academic standing.

d. Student representatives will serve on no more than two committees at one time.

e. Students may not be elected to the same committee for more than three consecutive years.

f. Representatives to the Executive Committee must:

1. Have completed 45 credits

2. Be candidates in good academic standing

XVIII. COMMITTEES

a. All elections to all committees will be held no later than April 15th for the following academic year.

b. The committees of the Ph.D. Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages are:

1. Executive Committee

The Executive Committee consists of eleven members, The Executive Officer, seven faculty, and three students. The Executive Officer, who chairs the Committee, is appointed by the President of The Graduate Center. The other faculty members are elected by the program's doctoral faculty. At least two faculty members, one in Linguistics and one in Literature, shall be Graduate Center appointees. The other five shall be elected at large by the doctoral faculty in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages from the senior colleges, and at least one shall be elected from any college substantially participating in the program [cf. section 3.5A, Governance of The Graduate Center}. There shall be three student members elected by the student body. All faculty members are elected for a term of three years; and student members are elected for one year.

2. Standing Committees


For all standing committees, except the Examination Committee and Elections Committee, the terms of office are three years for the faculty members and one year for student members.

3. Curriculum

The committee consists of the Executive Officer, two faculty members, and two elected student members.

4. Annual Examination

The committee consists of the Executive Officer and five faculty members appointed annually by the Executive Officer.

5. Admissions and Awards

The committee consists of the Executive Officer, two faculty members, and two elected student members.

6. Faculty Membership

The committee consists of the Executive Officer, two faculty members, and two elected student members.

7. Elections Committee

The committee consists of the Executive Officer, three faculty members, and three student members for the Executive Committee.

The Doctoral Faculty shall meet twice each year. The Executive Committee shall meet with students at least once each semester.

GRADUATE COUNCIL

One student and one alternate and one faculty member and one alternate are elected each year to the Graduate Council. Some of the main functions of the Graduate Council are:

1. To formulate educational policy for all graduate work in doctoral programs, including curriculum, standards of admission and academic performance, degree requirements, and student discipline.

2. To approve specific programs and curricula leading to the doctoral degree. To consider any other matter pertaining to academic issues in the doctoral program, and make recommendations to the CUNY Board.

DOCTORAL STUDENTS' COUNCIL (DSC)

Two students are elected each year to the Doctoral Students= Council. The Doctoral Students= Council assists and orients students in all matters within The Graduate Center. Some specific activities of this council are:

1. Distribute money to the various programs and chartered organizations organized by students.

2. Orient students in matters concerning grievances and conflicts that the students may have with either the program or The Graduate Center.

3. Determine how student activity fees are spent.

The student representatives to the DSC act as spokespersons for the student body in their respective disciplines. They are responsible for the money allocated to their program, although the student representatives do not necessarily have to be the organizers of a given activity.

GOVERNANCE OF THE PROGRAM

Governance of the program may be picked up at our office in Room 4116.

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATION

The Graduate School and University Center is an equal opportunity and affirmative action institution and does not discriminate on the basis of age, gender, sexual orientation, alienage or citizenship, religion, race, color, national or ethnic origin, disability, veteran status, genetic predisposition or carrier status, or marital status in its student admissions, employment, access to programs, and administration of educational policies.

Ms. Edith M. Rivera-Cancel is the Affirmative Action Officer of The Graduate School and University Center. The office is located in Room 7301; Telephone: 1-212-817-7410 (Voice/TTY).

Mr. Matthew G. Schoengood, Vice President for Student Affairs is The Graduate School and University Center's Section 504 / ADA Coordinator for Persons with Disabilities and Coordinator for Title IX, which prohibits sex discrimination in federally assisted education programs. Her office is located in Room 7301; Telephone: 1-212-817-7400.

Actions that involve discrimination or bias of any sort will be subject to disciplinary
sanctions in accordance with the Rules and Regulations for the maintenance of Public Order Pursuant to Article 129A of the Education Law, a copy of which will be found in the Bulletin of The Graduate School.

HUMAN SUBJECTS REGULATIONS

The Graduate Center has an ethical and legal commitment to the protection of human subjects in research. All research with human subjects, whether it is for the dissertation or for any other activity, must be reviewed and approved by the Committee on the Protection of Human Subjects prior to the initiation of the research.

All doctoral students advanced to Level III after September 1, 1999, need to submit a "Dissertation Proposal Clearance: Human Participants" form, which is sent to all students by the Registrar when they advance to Level III. Students are required to submit this form to the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs after the dissertation topic and methodology are approved by their committees and before research begins. If human participants are involved in a student's research, a human subjects application must be submitted to a CUNY Institutional Review Board in accord with the CUNY Principal Investigator's Manual for Submitting Proposals for Review by the CUNY Institutional Review Boards. (Available from the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs: Room 8309 or at http://inside.gc.cuny.edu.orsp.) The Graduate Center Committee on the Protection of Human Subjects or other CUNY campus institutional review boards must approve the application prior to beginning the research and issue an approval letter that must be submitted to the Office for Research and Sponsored Programs with the Dissertation Proposal Clearance form. If human participants are not involved in a student's research, the completed Dissertation Proposal Clearance form is submitted with the dissertation project abstract and methodology to The Graduate Center's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (Room 8309, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10016).