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Culture/Literature Track

A minimum of 60 credits beyond the bachelor's degree are required for the Ph.D. A maximum of 30 credits may be transferred from other institutions upon the Executive Officer's recommendation and University approval. The first 30 credits must include at least 21 credits in Peninsular and Latin American Literatures. The second 30 credits must include a minimum of four doctoral seminars at the 80000 level. It is advised that the students take an equal number of seminars in Peninsular and Latin American Literatures. All students in the literature track must take at least one course in either Portuguese or Brazilian Literature. The required courses are

  • SPAN. 70100 - History of the Language (must be taken by the completion of 45 credits)
  • SPAN. 70200 - Literary Theory (required as part of the first 30 credits)
  • SPAN. 70300 - Introduction to Methods of Research (required as part of the first 30 credits)

First Examination
Before completing more than 45 credits, students will be required to pass a written examination to determine their capability to pursue advanced doctoral studies. The First Examination, to be given in Spanish, will test the student's critical ability to analyze selected major works of different periods in the fields of Peninsular and Latin American Literature. Students must bear in mind that questions on literary criticism are an integral part of the examination.

A list of 16 works (8 in Peninsular and 8 in Latin American Literature) selected by the Annual Examination Committee will be made available at the office of the Executive Officer no later than six months before the date set for the examination. The examination will consist of two parts: 1) Peninsular Literature and 2) Latin American. The examination in Peninsular Literature will be divided into four sections: 1. Medieval, 2. Renaissance and Baroque, 3. Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century, 4. Twentieth and Twenty First Century. Latin American Literature will be divided into four sections: 1. Colonial, 2. Nineteenth Century, 3. From Modernismo to Avant-garde, 4. Twenty and Twenty First Century

LISTA DE TEXTOS PARA EL PRIMER EXAMEN AGOSTO 2014

Second Examination
After completing a minimum of 60 credits and fulfilling all other requirements, students must pass a second written examination in Spanish. The examination will revolve around four areas:

  • Primary Area: it will be selected from one of the eight major areas listed above. The examination will be based on a reading list of at least 25 books. The reading lists for all eight major areas are available at the office of the Executive Officer. This area will embrace all genres.
  • Secondary Area: it will be selected from the eight major areas listed above and should relate coherently to the primary and concentration areas. The examination will be based on a reading list of at least 25 books. The reading lists for all eight major areas are available at the office of the Executive Officer. This area will embrace all genres.
  • Concentration Area: it should be closely related to the major area and selected according to each student's research interests. This area may be defined by genre, movement, or topic, and must incorporate a unifying critical or theoretical perspective. The examination will be based on a list of at least 25 books or an equivalent number of texts to be selected by the student and the Chair of the Examination Committee. There can be no overlap between the readings included in the primary/secondary area lists and those included in the concentration area list.
  • Critical/Theoretical Area: it must relate coherently to the other areas. The examination will be based on a list of at least 25 books or an equivalent number of texts to be selected by the student and the Chair of the Examination Committee.

-Medieval
 
-Renacimiento y Barroco

-España: Siglos XVIII y XIX

-España: Siglos XX y XXI

-Colonial

-Latinoamérica: Siglo XIX

-Latinoamérica: De Modernismo a Vanguardia

-Latinoamérica: Siglo XX

Each student's Examination Committee will consist of three faculty members appointed by the Executive Officer in consultation with the student. Ultimately, approval of the areas selected and reading lists will rest on each student's Examination Committee.

The second examination will consist of a traditional in-class exam (based on the reading lists for the Primary and Secondary areas) and a take-home exam (based on the reading lists for the Concentration and Critical-Theoretical Fields). The IN-CLASS exam will be taken on a Friday, typically one week before the beginning of each semester. In the morning, students will answer 2 out of 4 questions on one of the two areas (Primary or Secondary) (3 hours); in the afternoon, they will answer 2 out of 4 questions on the remaining area (3 hours). On the same Friday, students will be given two essay questions based on the reading lists for the Concentration and Critical-Theoretical areas. The student will select one and write, over the weekend, an essay of approximately 3500 words (not including the list of cited works that must be presented at the end of the essay). The student will personally hand-deliver the essay by the following Monday at 2:00 pm.


Dissertation
Within one semester after passing the Second Examination, the candidate must submit in writing to the Executive Officer for approval his/her dissertation topic, the name of the dissertation director, and the two readers of his/her Dissertation Committee.

Within one year after passing the Second Examination, the candidate must submit a dissertation proposal to the Dissertation Committee for approval. The double-spaced written proposal, of at least 10 pages, must include a description of the topic, the methodology to be employed, the scholarly significance, the contribution to the field, and the feasibility of the project. A basic up-to-date bibliography of the topic following recent MLA guidelines will also be required. The proposal should be dated and signed by the dissertation director. After writing the dissertation proposal, the candidate shall make an oral presentation of the written proposal before the Dissertation Committee for approval.

Upon completion of the dissertation and after approval by the Dissertation Committee, the candidate shall defend the dissertation in a public oral examination in Spanish. The candidate's oral defense will consist of a presentation on the nature of the research and the results it has yielded, followed by a question period normally of one-hour duration. A majority vote of the Dissertation Committee will be required for the approval of the dissertation.