Show The Graduate Center Menu
 
 

Spring 2016


 
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
 
SPRING 2016
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 78200 – Mapping New York City in Translation
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Allen, []
 
SPAN 80000 – Multimodalities & Multiliteracies
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Garcia, []
(cross-listed with UED 71100)
 
SPAN 80100 – Temas de glotopolítica: clase, género y comunidad
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. del Valle, []
 
SPAN 82100 – Cervantes' Art of Fiction: from the Exemplary Novels to the Persiles
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Schwartz, []
 
SPAN 85000 – The City in Contemporary Spanish Literature, Cinema and Visual Arts
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Smith, []            
 
SPAN 86400 – Narrativa mexicana del siglo XX: modernidad, nación y guerra
GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Zavala, []
 
SPAN 87100 – Subjectivity, TV Miniseries, and the 40th Anniversary of the Coup d’état in Chile
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Dapia, []
 
SPAN 87300 – The Politics of Language & Cultures During the Spanish “Transición”
GC: Friday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. del Valle/Labrador, []
 
SPAN 87400 – Latin American Critical Theory
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Degiovanni, []
 
 
ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN 82000 – Rethinking National Literatures: The Catalan Case
GC: March 14, 16, 17 from 1:30 - 4:00 pm; March 15th at 11:00 am -1:00 pm, 1 credit, Prof. Santana, []
(Chair) [mini-course, 10 hours]
 
SPAN 87500 – Neofalantismo y futuro del idioma gallego: ideologías, desafíos y oportunidades
GC: March 21, 23, 24 from 1:30 - 4:00 pm; March 22 from 11:00 - 1:00pm, 1 credit, Prof. Ramallo, []
(Chair) [mini-course, 10 hours]
 
SEE ALSO
 
SPAN 88800 – Dissertation Seminar
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 0 credit, Prof. Degiovanni, []
 

PH.D. PROGRAM IN HISPANIC AND LUSO-BRAZILIAN LITERATURES AND LANGUAGES

SPRING 2016 – COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 78200 – Mapping New York City in Translation
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Allen, []
 
The "cities in translation" Sherry Simon describes in her marvelous 2012 book of that title include Montreal, Brussels, Barcelona and Dakar but specifically exclude New York, where, citing Doris Sommer, Simon sustains that "bilingual aesthetics... are oppositional" in that they take place on a home-host, insider-outsider divide.  This course posits that New York's Anglo-Hispanic axis runs through a number of sites that may correspond to Simon's notion of the "dual city," in which "two historically rooted language communities feel a sense of entitlement to the same territory." These sites of translation involve literature, music, art, education, history, theatre, journalism, commerce and many other features of the city's life. Beginning with a historical overview of writers, translators, periodicals, films and other entities that have created the cultural space of Nueva York/New York, the course challenges each student to select a site of translation within New York City — be it an individual writer, artist or musician, past or present, or an institution such as a museum, serial publication, theatre, shop, restaurant, musical venue, archive, etc.—as the focus of a research project. The research will investigate issues of translation and bilingualism as they play out at the chosen site, and will also involve the practice of translation. One end result will be a collaborative map of Nueva York/New York to be presented and distributed at the Latin American Studies Association's 50th Anniversary International Congress May 27-30. This course will be taught in English and Spanish.

SPAN 80000 – Multimodalities & Multiliteracies
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Garcia, []
(cross-listed with UED 71100)
 
Schools most often value only one system of signification–– texts produced traditionally in dominant “standard” languages. But the young people who interact with texts are increasingly visibly and audibly different, the product of the deterritorialization of people and the deregulation of markets brought about by a neoliberal global political economy.  At the same time, new technologies have enabled the simultaneous use of different modes of signification. These include multimodal texts that include images, videos, emojis, signed languages, and other multimodalities, as well as plurilingual/multilingual texts that contain language features not considered “standard” or dominant. This seminar explores the ways in which diverse young people today construct and make sense of multimodal/plurilingual texts outside of school, in contrast to the ways in which they interact with those texts that schools value as their “anchor” texts. By focusing on young people’s engagement with multiple ways of making meaning as a semiotic activity, the seminar explores the potential of multiliteracies, as well as reasons for the exclusion of multimodal and plurilingual texts from traditional school literacy.


SPAN 80100 – Temas de glotopolítica: clase, género y comunidad
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. del Valle, []
 
En este seminario se examinarán las bases teóricas y metodológicas de la glotopolítica siguiendo el desarrollo del campo que han ido definiendo publicaciones tales como Guespin y Marcellesi (1986), Elvira Arnoux (2000), Burke, Crowley y Girvin (2000), Joseph (2006), Del Valle (2007 y 2013), Del Valle y Arnoux (2010), Arnoux y Nothstein (2013). El seminario se organizará en torno a tres temas. En primer lugar, se examinará el tratamiento que se ha hecho de la estratificación social desde la sociolingüística descriptiva y crítica y se estimará la pertinencia del concepto de clase social para la glotopolítica. Segundo, se repasará la influencia mutua entre los estudios de género y la sociolingüística descriptiva y crítica y, de nuevo, se valorará el potencial de la perspectiva glotopolítica para desarrollar productivamente la relación. Finalmente, se hará un recorrido por los conceptos de comunidad que se avanzan en la sociolingüística descriptiva y crítica con especial atención a la función glotopolítica de categorías tales como etnicidad, nación e imperio. El curso se impartirá en español.
 

 
SPAN 82100 – Cervantes' Art of Fiction: from the Exemplary Novels to the Persiles
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Schwartz, []
 
Cervantes started his career as a writer with a pastoral novel.  La Galatea, a literary genre which was in fashion in the second half of the sixteenth-century.  At the same time, or soon after, he began composing short-fiction, following the model of Boccaccio’s novella, which he would recreate and transform in his twelve Novelas ejemplares, some of which are based upon other Italian sources.  In the years between the publication of the first (1605) and the second part (1615) of Don Quijote, Cervantes was also obviously working on his last work of fiction,  Los trabajos de Persiles y Sigismunda, published posthumously in 1617.  The purpose of this course will be to study Cervantes’s fiction from the perspective of early modern poetics and rhetoric, while focusing on a selection of literary and historical topics and themes that he privileged.  Our reading or re-reading of Cervantes’s works will also allow us to follow the process of transformation of narrative fiction since his times, when it followed the Aristotelian principle of verisimilitude until the eclosion of realism in the nineteenth-century. This course will be taught in Spanish.
 
SPAN 85000 – The City in Contemporary Spanish Literature, Cinema and Visual Arts
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Smith, []            
 
This course, which is taught in Spanish, examines the modern Spanish city in the media of novel (Martín Santos, Laforet, Goytisolo), film and TV (Almodóvar, Alex de la Iglesia, TVE’s Fortunata y Jacinta and La Regenta), and visual art (painter Antonio López, web artist Marisa González). Each class examines an urban theorist (eg Henri Lefebvre, Michel de Certeau, Manuel Castells), a work of criticism by a scholar of Spanish urbanism, and one or more creative works.
Grading is by written exam (25%), student oral participation, weekly web posting, and presentation (25%) and final paper (50%). A reader will be available. This course will be taught in Spanish.
 
SPAN 86400 – Narrativa mexicana del siglo XX: modernidad, nación y guerra
GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Zavala, []
 
En este seminario se estudiarán textos fundacionales de la modernidad literaria mexicana en el siglo XX. Se pensará la modernidad literaria en tanto discurso de conocimiento en tensión con formaciones de estado y nación (Foucault), como efecto de relaciones de poder, hegemonía y capital simbólico en el campo literario (Bourdieu) y como intervención intelectual contrahegemónica (Rancière, Badiou, Žižek). Se analizará también la relación histórica entre el Estado y la tradición literaria como una dialéctica de mediación y resistencia. Finalmente, se cuestionará la función política de las representaciones literarias y su impacto general en los campos de producción cultural. Se incluirán, entre otras, lecturas de Mariano Azuela, Martín Luis Guzmán, Nelly Campobello, Juan Rulfo, Carlos Fuentes, José Revueltas, Jorge Ibargüengoitia, José Agustín, Elena Poniatowska, Daniel Sada, Roberto Bolaño y Juan Villoro.  El curso se impartirá en español.
 

SPAN 87100 – Subjectivity, TV Miniseries, and the 40th Anniversary of the Coup d’état in Chile
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Dapia, []
 
During the commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the coup d’état in Chile in September 2013, television played a crucial role. A remarkable plethora of programs emerged ranging from documentaries series such as “Chile, las imágenes perdidas” (Chile’s Forbidden Images), which featured never-before-seen footage of dozens of episodes of repression during the years of dictatorship, to docudramas such as “Ecos del desierto”(Echoes of the Desert), the first major commercial TV series to deal with the slaughter of the “Caravan of Death” in a fictional way and thus offering a glimpse into the military world, which, to my knowledge, has not been explored before. This new tradition of successful TV programs dealing with Pinochet’s dictatorship and thus consciously seeking to contribute to collective memory was inaugurated by “Los 80” (The Eighties). It was produced by Andrés Wood and ran over seven seasons (from 2008 to 2014). This new television trend was continued by “Los Archivos del Cardenal” (The Cardinal’s Files), which ran over two seasons (2011; 2014) and was based on cases that were represented by the Vicaría de la Solidaridad, Chile’s most active human rights organization during the 1970s and 1980s.  This course explores the notion(s) of subjectivity underlying two of these television series, “Ecos del desierto” and the first twelve-episode season of “Los Archivos del Cardenal.”  Some of the questions that we intend to discuss are as follows: How do these TV series portray one’s sense of subjectivity when confronted with terror, oppression, and torture? If, according to some philosophers and theorists subjectivity implies a process of enslavement of our fluid selves, how do we distinguish between the enslavement allegedly in-built in the process of becoming a subject and the enslavement inherent in a subjectivity paralyzed by terror and cruelty? What elements of subjectivity are the targets of oppression?  How does human rights talk become constitutive of subjective positions? Why can certain subjectivities so enthusiastically embrace and act for repressive regimes? How can one create new, corporeal, gendered and oppositional subjectivities that challenge hegemonic forms of subjectivity? Do our attempts to forge new subjectivities necessarily occur through the very ideological framework that we choose to challenge?  Among the theorists of subjectivity that we shall engage with to frame our discussions are Alain Badiou, Judith Butler, Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, León Rozitchner, and Slavoj Žižek. This course will be taught in Spanish.
 

 
SPAN 87300 – The Politics of Language & Cultures During the Spanish “Transición”
GC: Friday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. del Valle/Labrador, []
 
En el otoño de 2014, saltaba a los medios españoles la noticia de que la casa editorial española Planeta había presionado al ensayista Gregorio Morán para que eliminara un capítulo de diez páginas de un manuscrito de más de ochocientas por el cual la editorial le había entregado ya un adelanto. Morán se negó y el libro, íntegro, vio finalmente la luz en Akal, bajo el título El cura y los mandarines. Historia no oficial del Bosque de los Letrados. Cultura y política en España, 1962-1996. El capítulo dichoso contenía una severa crítica a figuras centrales en la gestión de la Real Academia Española durante dicho periodo. Planeta – se decía – temía que la RAE, en venganza, retirara su histórico acuerdo con la editorial, privándola así de los pingües beneficios de la venta de los textos normativos del idioma.
Este episodio evoca varios de los procesos que se abordarán en este seminario. Por un lado, el percance se produce en un contexto marcado por la alteración del mapa político español desde el 15 de Mayo de 2011, cuando multitudes ciudadanas ocuparon las principales plazas del país. Se daba inicio a un nuevo ciclo de acontecimientos en el cual la politización ciudadana, la emergencia de nuevos movimientos sociales y de un nuevo partido político, Podemos, así como la renovada pulsión independentista de un amplio sector del nacionalismo catalán trasformaban profundamente el vocabulario político de las tres últimas décadas de cultura democrática y los valores que se le asociaban. Por otro lado, en dicha escena se dan cita las políticas de la lengua que representa la RAE, los compromisos del entramado editorial español y la mercantilización de la cultura desde múltiples espacios sociales. En tal espacio, sintagmas tales como “derecho a decidir”, “régimen del 78” o “Cultura de la Transición” se incorporan al discurso de reflexión crítica sobre el pasado reciente del país y cuestionan con particular efecto los consensos que en materia política, económica y cultural han venido sirviendo como base de un (siempre disputado) imaginario nacional.
El seminario examinará los arreglos lingüísticos y culturales que caracterizaron el dispositivo-periodo  denominado "La Transición" y el desarrollo de los cuestionamientos actuales de tales arreglos. Para ello trabajaremos desde varios archivos diferentes. Uno de tipo histórico y arqueológico, a través del cual analizaremos los procesos de acuñación lingüística sucedidos tras la muerte de Franco conducentes a la fundación de las que llamaremos "lenguas del consenso democrático" y al borrado cultural de los distintos estadios intermedios de dicha fundación y de las muchas voces ciudadanas que se les opusieron. Otro de tipo contemporáneo, donde atenderemos a los cambios semánticos que, a partir de la crisis de 2008, se han producido en los marcos políticos hegemónicos heredados de los años setenta. Finalmente, atenderemos al archivo de los discursos metalingüísticos generados en torno al dispositivo institucional de las lenguas (academias, oficinas de normalización lingüística, congresos) como zona en la que explorar modelos concretos (y, con frecuencia, enfrentados) de comunidad y democracia a lo largo del periodo estudiado.
A partir de las aportaciones de la historia conceptual, la socio-lingüística, la glotopolítica, la teoría estética y los estudios culturales, y mediante la lectura de teóricos como, por un lado, Laclau, Mouffe, Rancière, Klemperer, Bourdieu, Koselleck o Benjamin y, por otro, Talbot Taylor, John Joseph, Tony Crowley, Deborah Cameron o Kathryn Woolard, en este seminario se discutirán las articulaciones entre política, historia y lenguaje; entre sujetos colectivos y vocabularios comunes; entre instituciones, memoria y discurso; o entre cambio semántico y temporalidad. Para ello utilizaremos toda suerte de materiales, desde el Boletín Oficial del Estado y actas de congresos de la lengua hasta las páginas de contactos de una revista underground, pasando por novelas, documentales, nuevas tecnologías, graffiti, cartelería política, películas, artículos de periódicos, diccionarios y gramáticas, manifestaciones, monumentos memoriales y ceremonias de abdicación. El curso se impartirá en español.
 

SPAN 87400 – Latin American Critical Theory
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Degiovanni, []
 
This seminar will discuss groundbreaking texts produced by Latin American cultural analysts in the last thirty years. In what will be an inquiry into the politics of academic knowledge in the global theoretical marketplace, we will map the genealogical lines and epistemological crossroads that played a crucial role in the emergence of a number of scholarly discourses about Latin America—notions of modernity, colonialism, globalization, and the popular will be pivotal in this course. We will also examine issues and disputes that helped unleash disciplinary shifts vis-à-vis other theoretical and critical paradigms produced in the U.S. and Europe.  The reading list will include texts by Ángel Rama, Antonio Cornejo Polar, Julio Ramos, Néstor García Canclini, Walter Mignolo, Beatriz Sarlo, Román de la Campa, John Beverley, and Josefina Ludmer. This course will be taught in Spanish.
 
 
ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN 82000 – Rethinking National Literatures: The Catalan Case
GC: March 14, 16, 17 from 1:30 - 4:00 pm; March 15th at 11:00 am -1:00 pm, 1 credit, Prof. Santana, []
(Chair) [mini-course, 10 hours]
 
The emergence of Iberian Studies as an alternative paradigm to Hispanism has not only forced a reconsideration of the understanding of interliterary relations within the Iberian Peninsula, but also -by exploring the internal cultural and linguistic complexity of its individual components- underlined the need to question traditional conceptualizations of national literatures.  At the same time, the increasing globalization of culture has led to new formulations regarding the relations between regional and transnational literatures, with particular attention being paid to the role of translation.  This seminar will analyze the case of Catalan literature and explore some of the theoretical and practical issues involved in these critical debates.  This course will be taught in Spanish.
 
 
SPAN 87500 – Neofalantismo y futuro del idioma gallego:ideologías, desafíos   y oportunidades
GC: March 21, 23, 24 from 1:30 - 4:00 pm; March 22 from 11:00 - 1:00pm, 1 credit, Prof. Ramallo, []
(Chair) [mini-course, 10 hours]
 
En este curso, entendemos al neohablante de gallego como un sujeto que aprendió a hablar en castellano, que tuvo esta lengua como idioma familiar, que aprendió el gallego fuera de la familia, generalmente en el sistema educativo y que solo (o muy mayoritariamente) habla gallego. Dentro del sistema lingüístico gallego, los neohablantes comenzaron a ser estudiados a partir del proceso de estandarización reciente de la lengua. Antes de 1975, esta categoría de hablantes era residual. Pues bien, los neohablantes, con su diversidad de perfiles sociodemográficos, con sus motivaciones e ideologías, constituyen un grupo social de especial relevancia para comprender el presente y el futuro del idioma gallego. En este curso abordaremos un análisis global del fenómeno denominado neofalantismo, su origen, sus prácticas, su representación social y su impacto en el cambio del orden sociolingüístico. El curso se orienta desde una visión crítica con la intención de proporcionar una perspectiva ideológica de los y de las neofalantes. El curso se impartirá en español.
 
 
 
SEE ALSO
 
SPAN 88800 – Dissertation Seminar
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 0 credit, Prof. Degiovanni, []