Show The Graduate Center Menu
 
 

Fall 2015

PH.D. PROGRAM IN HISPANIC AND LUSO-BRAZILIAN LITERATURES AND LANGUAGES
FALL 2015  -  COURSE  LISTINGS

THREE-CREDITS
SPAN 70100 – El español como objeto de interés histórico
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. del Valle, [28730]

SPAN 70200 – Hispanic Critical & Cultural Theory
GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Zavala, [28731]

SPAN 70500 – Spanish Syntax
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Otheguy, [28729]
(cross-listed with LING 79100)

SPAN 87000 – Neo-Baroque Continuities & Ruptures in Cuban & Mexican Literatures
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Riobó, [28734]

SPAN 87100 – In-Between Worlds & Tradition: Rereading the “Crónicas de Indias”
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Chang-Rodríguez, [28733]

SPAN 87200 – The Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar and Guillermo del Toro
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [28732]    

SPAN 87300 – Políticas de la Lengua y Culturas de Transición en España (1975-2015)
GC: Friday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. José del Valle & Prof. Germán Labrador, [28735]

SPAN 87400 – Asaltos a la biblioteca: Scenes of Reading in Latin America
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Degiovanni, [28728]

ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS

SPAN 87200 – Reflexiones en torno a una piedra
GC: Monday, 10/5/2015 – Thursday, 10/8/2015, 1:30-4:00 p.m., Rm. 4116.18, 1 credit, Prof. Bernardo Atxaga, [28736]
(Atxaga Chair)

SPAN 87200 – Economia política, estructura de la comunicación y sociolingüistica del Catalán
GC: Monday, 9/28/2015, 1:30 – 4:00 p.m., Tuesday, 9/29/2015, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Wednesday, 9/30/2015 & Thursday, 10/1/2015, 1:30-4:00 p.m., Rm. 4116.18, 1 credit, Prof. Toni Molla, [28737]
(Rodoreda Chair)

SEE ALSO
SPAN 88800 – Dissertation Workshop
GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credit, Prof. Degiovanni, [28739]


FALL 2015
Ph.D. Program in Hispanic & Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages
Course Descriptions


THREE-CREDITS


SPAN 70100 – El español como objeto de interés histórico
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. del Valle, [28730]

Este curso propone un recorrido por varias articulaciones de la lengua española y la historia; una mirada acaso irónica sobre las estrategias de constitución del objeto bajo condiciones disciplinarias y políticas diversas. Nos detendremos en la “Gramática Histórica”, en la “Historia de la Lengua”, en la “Historia Social” y en la “Historia Política de la Lengua”, que, aunque vislumbran objetos lingüísticos sólo parcialmente coincidentes, los encuadran sin embargo en una misma ventana cronológica que va desde los tiempos en que el latín fue introducido en la Península Ibérica hasta el momento actual, cuando aún el valor de la unidad y el significado simbólico del español en el mundo reciben atención privilegiada dentro y fuera de las disciplinas que se ocupan del estudio del lenguaje. Por lo tanto, este curso no se plantea reproducir la descripción de la historia de la lengua como un proceso de evolución lineal de unidades y sistemas fónicos, morfológicos y sintácticos; no se propone tampoco señalar los hitos culturales y políticos que puntúan el proceso de la cristalización de la lengua; no apuesta ni siquiera por identificar fenómenos sociolingüísticos –tales como la variación, el bilingüismo, la diglosia o la estandarización– que inciden sobre la evolución del idioma. La perspectiva aquí adoptada invita a aproximarse de manera reflexiva y crítica a las articulaciones de lenguaje e historia, a las disciplinas mismas que configuran como objetos de estudio la emergencia histórica del español como “lengua”, su evolución orgánica y las circunstancias pasadas y presentes de su propagación por la Península Ibérica y por el continente americano. El curso se impartirá en español.

SPAN 70200 – Hispanic Critical & Cultural Theory
GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Zavala, [28731]

The most pressing debates currently taking place in the field of literary studies activate a wide range of theoretical notions that inscribe a genealogy of schools of thought, movements and interventions branching out across the Western world. These theories have in turn become central to our comprehension of literature as it intersects the general experience of culture, politics, economics and history. The present course will examine a historical arch of literary theory, from the early twentieth century to the latest developments conditioning relevant discussions on recent cultural productions. The course will explore approaches to literary texts and other cultural objects through linguistics and semiotics, post-structuralism and deconstruction, (Neo)Marxism, gender and race, post-colonialism, psychoanalysis and anthropology, politics, ethics and sociology. The course will pay particular attention to theorizations and interventions from and on Latin America. The class will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

SPAN 70500 – Spanish Syntax
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Otheguy, [28729]
(cross-listed with LING 79100)

The course provides a review of what the tradition considers the basic syntactic structures of Spanish, as these are analyzed in sentence-based traditional grammars and as they’ve been partially incorporated into generative analyses.

The center of the course is the study of Spanish grammar situated in what recent works refer to as functional-cognitive space (cf. Butler & Gonzálvez-García 2014). The position is taken that words, affixes, and constructions all encode semantic content, and that there is no formal autonomous syntax that is independent of meaning. Mental grammars are at heart semiotic systems whose form is shaped by the exigencies of communication and the proclivities and limitations of human language users. Rather than the traditional sentence, the unit of analysis is the sign, that is, the union of a linguistic form with a meaning.

The study of the grammar of Spanish consists in the discovery of (the formulation of testable hypothesis about) the grammatical signs of Spanish. The approach shares with sociolinguistics an interest in naturalistic corpus data that is not limited to the categorical but encompasses variation (and that focuses on what speakers actually say rather than on their intuitions). In this vein, topics covered include not only categorical problems of Spanish grammar but also phenomena studied at times under sociolinguistic approaches.

Classes are conducted in Spanish, with liberal use of English at the students’ request. Some readings are in Spanish, some in English. Class participation, presentations, papers and exams, are in the language of the student’s choice.

SPAN 87000 – Neo-Baroque Continuities & Ruptures in Cuban & Mexican Literatures
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Riobó, [28734]

This course will study the origins of the neo-Baroque movement in the debates regarding the knotty cultural and political legacies of the colonial period in Latin America's literary modernity. We will analyze why the Baroque, traditionally considered a 17th-century European artistic period following the Renaissance, came to describe the post-modern culture of non-European mestizo regions in the last century; particularly in Cuba and Mexico. We will analyze the works of Carpentier, Fuentes, Guillén, Lezama Lima, Paz, and Sarduy. We will also examine the literary criticism of de Campos, Deleuze, García Canclini, González-Echevarría, Harbison, Perlongher, Wellek, and others. The course will be taught in Spanish.

SPAN 87100 – In-Between Worlds & Tradition: Rereading the “Crónicas de Indias”
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Chang-Rodríguez, [28733]

This course will study a diverse group of testimonies from the early contact period and beyond.  Generally grouped under the label “crónicas de Indias,” they will include letters, histories, relaciones, and chronicles written by men and women of diverse backgrounds and ethnicity. These works will be situated in their historical and literary contexts in order to analyze the objectives of their authors and understand their meaning in the shared culture and history of Europe and the Americas. Among the issues to be discussed are: 1) how these texts became “literature;” 2) alphabetic culture vis-à-vis native traditions; 3) the polemics about the indigenous population; 4) the eye-witness and the construction of history; 5) the indigenous perception of the conquest; 6) gender issues.  Class discussions will be illustrated with images and communication facilitated through Blackboard. There will be ample time for discussion and pursuing individual projects.

Readings will include: selections from early letters (Colón, Isabel de Guevara, Cortés* [Castalia or Porrúa])  Bartolomé de las Casas* (Cátedra), Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (Biblioteca Ayacucho, on-line), Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala (Royal Library Copenhagen, on-line), native testimonies from Mexico, Catalina de Erauso (Cátedra)*.  *Purchase text. The specific bibliography will be distributed in class.

Among the general requirements are: team work, exam, research essays (MLA Style, latest edition), active class participation reflecting reading of assigned material.
The course will be conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 87200 – The Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar and Guillermo del Toro
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [28732]

This course examines the works of contemporary Spain and Mexico's most successful filmmakers, critically and commercially. These two figures might appear to be very different and, indeed, have formally collaborated only when Almodóvar produced del Toro's The Devil's Backbone, shot and set in Spain. Although he has greater transnational projection than perhaps any other European filmmaker, Almodóvar has filmed all seventeen features in his home country and language; while del Toro, with just eight films, has made for himself a nomadic career in two languages and three countries.

Yet it can be argued that the pair has a great deal in common. For example, both directors have embraced transmedia, going beyond the feature film. Almodóvar's production company has expanded into television and theater; del Toro is a respected creator in the fields of the comic book and novel. Their internet presence is also substantial.

The aims of the course are industrial, critical, and theoretical. First, Almodóvar is placed in the context of audiovisual production in Spain, while del Toro (as director and producer) is contextualized within the 'golden triangle' of Mexico, Europe, and the US. Second, both cineastes are interrogated for signs of auteurship (a consistent aesthetic and media image), sharing as they do a self-fashioning that takes place, unusually, within the confines of genre cinema (comedy/melodrama and fantasy/horror, respectively). Finally, the course explores how English-language critics have assimilated these two Spanish-speaking directors to debates in Anglo-American film studies that draw on psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, and the transnational.

Recommended, but not required, is the book Desire Unlimited: The Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar (3rd edition, 2014), written by the instructor (on reserve at GC library).

Grading is by written exam (25%), student oral participation and presentation (25%) and final paper (50%). The course will be conducted in English.

SPAN 87300 – Políticas de la Lengua y Culturas de Transición en España (1975-2015)
GC: Friday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. José del Valle & Prof. Germán Labrador, [28735]
En el otoño de 2014, saltaba a los medios españoles la noticia de que la casa editorial española Planeta había presionado al ensayista Gregorio Morán para que eliminara un capítulo de diez páginas de un manuscrito de más de ochocientas por el cual la editorial le había entregado ya un adelanto. Morán se negó y el libro, íntegro, vio finalmente la luz en Akal, bajo el título El cura y los mandarines. Historia no oficial del Bosque de los Letrados. Cultura y política en España, 1962-1996. El capítulo dichoso contenía una severa crítica a figuras centrales en la gestión de la Real Academia Española durante dicho periodo. Planeta – se decía – temía que la RAE, en venganza, retirara su histórico acuerdo con la editorial, privándola así de los pingües beneficios de la venta de los textos normativos del idioma.

Este episodio evoca varios de los procesos que se abordarán en este seminario. Por un lado, el percance se produce en un contexto marcado por la alteración del mapa político español desde el 15 de Mayo de 2011, cuando multitudes ciudadanas ocuparon las principales plazas del país. Se daba inicio a un nuevo ciclo de acontecimientos en el cual la politización ciudadana, la emergencia de nuevos movimientos sociales y de un nuevo partido político, Podemos, así como la renovada pulsión independentista de un amplio sector del nacionalismo catalán trasformaban profundamente el vocabulario político de las tres últimas décadas de cultura democrática y los valores que se le asociaban. Por otro lado, en dicha escena se dan cita las políticas de la lengua que representa la RAE, los compromisos del entramado editorial español y la mercantilización de la cultura desde múltiples espacios sociales. En tal espacio, sintagmas tales como “derecho a decidir”, “régimen del 78” o “Cultura de la Transición” se incorporan al discurso de reflexión crítica sobre el pasado reciente del país y cuestionan con particular efecto los consensos que en materia política, económica y cultural han venido sirviendo como base de un (siempre disputado) imaginario nacional.

El seminario examinará los arreglos lingüísticos y culturales que caracterizaron el dispositivo-periodo  denominado "La Transición" y el desarrollo de los cuestionamientos actuales de tales arreglos. Para ello trabajaremos desde varios archivos diferentes. Uno de tipo histórico y arqueológico, a través del cual analizaremos los procesos de acuñación lingüística sucedidos tras la muerte de Franco conducentes a la fundación de las que llamaremos "lenguas del consenso democrático" y al borrado cultural de los distintos estadios intermedios de dicha fundación y de las muchas voces ciudadanas que se les opusieron. Otro de tipo contemporáneo, donde atenderemos a los cambios semánticos que, a partir de la crisis de 2008, se han producido en los marcos políticos hegemónicos heredados de los años setenta. Finalmente, atenderemos al archivo de los discursos metalingüísticos generados en torno al dispositivo institucional de las lenguas (academias, oficinas de normalización lingüística, congresos) como zona en la que explorar modelos concretos (y, con frecuencia, enfrentados) de comunidad y democracia a lo largo del periodo estudiado.

A partir de las aportaciones de la historia conceptual, la socio-lingüística, la glotopolítica, la teoría estética y los estudios culturales, y mediante la lectura de teóricos como, por un lado, Laclau, Mouffe, Rancière, Klemperer, Bourdieu, Koselleck o Benjamin y, por otro, Talbot Taylor, John Joseph, Tony Crowley, Deborah Cameron o Kathryn Woolard, en este seminario se discutirán las articulaciones entre política, historia y lenguaje; entre sujetos colectivos y vocabularios comunes; entre instituciones, memoria y discurso; o entre cambio semántico y temporalidad. Para ello utilizaremos toda suerte de materiales, desde el Boletín Oficial del Estado y actas de congresos de la lengua hasta las páginas de contactos de una revista underground, pasando por novelas, documentales, nuevas tecnologías, graffiti, cartelería política, películas, artículos de periódicos, diccionarios y gramáticas, manifestaciones, monumentos memoriales y ceremonias de abdicación. El curso se impartirá en español.

SPAN 87400 – Asaltos a la biblioteca: Scenes of Reading in Latin America
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Degiovanni, [28728]

This course will look into the way in which the figure of the reader has been portrayed in Latin American verbal and visual artifacts from the 19th century through the present.  By focusing on a variety of fictional and nonfictional pieces, we will discuss to what extent representations of interactions between people and books, libraries and other cultural artifacts have served as vehicle for addressing questions of cultural value, thinking about the connection between politics and the publishing market, and interpreting gender and social issues.  Drawing on theoretical contributions by Robert Darnton, Roger Chartier, and Jacques Ranciere, among others, we will go from the study of portraits of real and imaginary readers by several Latin American visual artists (such as Carlos Enrique Pellegrini and Antonio Berni) to the analysis of narrations of proletarian and rural workers’ relations with canonical and noncanonical books (as viewed, for instance, by Roberto Arlt and Jorge Luis Borges).  Special attention will be paid to the consumption of best sellers in Latin America (including Jorge Isaac’s “María”, José María Vargas Vila’s “Flor de Fango”, as well as novels by writers of the Boom). The course will end by examining the discourses and practices of alternative publishing projects, like editoriales cartoneras, as articulated in their public interventions and the fiction of Washington Cucurto. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS

SPAN 87200 – Reflexiones en torno a una piedra
GC: Monday, 10/5/2015 – Thursday, 10/8/2015, 1:30-4:00 p.m., 1 credit, Prof. Bernardo Atxaga, [28736]
(Atxaga Chair)


Se ha escrito mucho sobre la importancia que para el ser humano tiene la literatura, aunque en la práctica, a la hora de ser incluida en los planes de estudio o en la lista de los temas top del siglo XXI, tal importancia se haya puesto en entredicho. El curso tratará de repensar esta cuestión, analizando el vínculo de la expresión poética o narrativa con el prestigio de los lugares del mundo, o con lo que, desde las Confesiones de Rousseau, llamamos “subjetividad”. El curso se impartirá en español.

SPAN 87200 – Economia política, estructura de la comunicación y sociolingüistica del Catalán
GC: Monday, 9/28/2015, 1:30 – 4:00 p.m., Tuesday, 9/29/2015, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Wednesday, 9/30/2015 & Thursday, 10/1/2015, 1:30-4:00 p.m., 1 credit, Prof. Toni Molla, [28737]


El curso analiza los factores políticos, económicos, socioculturales y tecnológicos que determinan la situación social de las lenguas, y específicamente de la lengua catalana. Con una dinámica participativa, partiremos de textos ensayísticos y periodísticos --europeos, españoles y catalanes-- que avalan, desde la Sociología y, sobre todo, la Economía Política de la Comunicación, la idea de que el futuro de los idiomas, al margen de su valor simbólico, depende de su utilidad instrumental. El curso se impartirá en español.