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Students

Frédéric-Charles Baitinger

M.A. Political Science, Sciences Po, Grenoble
M.A. Philosophy, Sorbonne, Paris.

Fields of specialization: 19th and 20th century literature, continental philosophy, psychoanalysis

Frédéric-Charles Baitinger earned a Master's degree in political science at Science-Po Grenoble and a Master's degree in philosophy (on Kierkegaard and Nietzsche) at Paris I, Panthéon Sorbonne. His studies lead him to become an art critic for magazines, galleries and art editors. He has published, as an art critic, many articles as well as three books with Edition Critères. He is also the chief editor of the online art magazine: www.artup-tv.com.

In the context of his doctoral dissertation, he is interested in the work of Georges Bataille and more broadly, in the way in which literature overlaps (and sometimes supersedes) the discourse of philosophy and psychoanalysis. He gave a paper entitled « Rire et transgression dans le roman Ma mère, de Georges Bataille », at Rutgers university and he's about to publish in the French Journal Humoresques an article on the question of tragic-laughter. He's currently organizing the conference for the French department (on Transgression) and writing a paper (on the Anarchist Banker from Pessoa) for the next 20th and 21st c. conference on Money. Finally, he just finished translating an article on animal ethics (from Ralph Campora) which has been published on the one-line journal Phaenex (Journal of existential and phenomenological theory and culture). Frédéric-Charles Baitinger is also teaching French at Hunter College.
 

Chandra Balkaran
B.A., French, SUNY at Stonybrook
M.A., French, SUNY at Stonybrook
 

 

Viral Bhatt
B.A., French, Drew University
M.Phil., French, CUNY, The Graduate Center
Areas of Specialization: Women's Studies, Gender Studies, Women's Films and Filmmaking, Feminist Theory.

Viral Bhatt earned her B.A. (Hons) in French from Drew University, where she wrote her senior thesis, Une étude du passé colonial de la France à travers quelques films contemporains with a special focus and sensibility to the female director's lens. A firm believer in the value and significance of interdisciplinary studies, Viral has completed a Certificate in Women's Studies and her dissertation topic aims to explore the role of the female body in contemporary French and Francophone films of female directors. Viral has given a lecture at Drew University on the importance and relevance of Hélène Cixous, Luce Irigaray, and Monique Wittig to contemporary feminist and gender studies. She recently presented a paper, "Catherine Breillat and the Question of Women's Sexuality" at the Sexuality Across the Discipline Conference at The University of Binghamton. She currently teaches French at William Paterson University.

 

Erika Bodor
B.A., French, University of Colorado at Denver
Languages: Hungarian, French









Angèle Renard Branca

Maîtrise de Lettres Classiques, Université de Haute-Bretagne (Rennes, France, 1996)

Areas of Specialization: theatre; 17th and 18th century women actors, spectators and playwrights; gender theory; history of emotions; political theory

Languages: French and Italian

Angèle is currently working on her dissertation: “The Politics of Empathy: Women and the Staging of Pity and Sympathy in French Theatre (1598-1794)”. She published “A Woman’s Happy Tragedy: The Paternal Order in Question- Madame de Villedieu’s Manlius” (Fortune and Fatality: Performing the Tragic in Early Modern France (1553-1715), ed. Desmond Hosford, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008) and presented the following papers: “Resurrecting the Commune on Stage: Nadine (1882) by Louise Michel” (Cornell University, 2006), « XVIIth-Century Tragic Acting Techniques: the Monster and the Actor » (The Graduate Center, 2005), and “Cet Obscur Objet du Désir : Le Théâtre de Bernard-Marie Koltès” (The Graduate Center, 2004.) Angèle has also directed and acted in Bajazet by Racine, a staging with 17th-century acting techniques, The Opportunities of a Night by Crébillon fils, and Quai Ouest by Bernard-Marie Koltès.

Angèle was the project coordinator for Act French, a festival of New Works held at the Martin Segal Theatre at the Graduate Center in 2005. She also taught French at CUNY and the French Institute-Alliance Française in New York as well as literature classes (20th century Francophone novels and drama) at CUNY and at the Institute for American Universities in Avignon, France. She is currently teaching French at Ethical Culture Fieldston Middle School, where she is Chair of the World Language program. In her teaching, she is interested in developing differentiated instruction and assessments, student-centered activities and interdisciplinary work and seeks to develop her students’ understanding of the Francophone cultures in the world and, in particular, in New York.

 

Chris Brandon
B.A., French and Comparative Literature, Illinois State University
M.A., French Literature, Tulane University

Interests: 19th and 20th century literature, the international avant-garde, visual/media poetics, early cinema, game studies.

After passing his orals with distinction and advancing to candidacy, Chris is working on a dissertation project entitled "Mallarmé to Media: From Creative Play to Digital Creation," which explores a lineage between Mallarmé's poetic theories and new media poetry. He has also given papers on Mallarmé, kinetic poetry, hysteria in silent film, and witnessing. Having worked at Bronx Community College, Lehman College, he currently teaches at Fordham University. Chris is recently the recipient of a Doctoral Student Research Grant for a research trip abroad.

 

Christina Buehler
B.A., French, St. Anselm College
M.A., French, Middlebury College

Christina is a doctoral candidate currently writing her dissertation on Mme. d'Aulnoy and other women fairy tale writers of 17th and 18th century France. She has been teaching French and Latin at St. Anthony's High School on Long Island since 1994. In addition to teaching full time, Christina was promoted to Director of Public Relations in 2007. Aside from her academic and administrative responsibilities at St. Anthony's, Christina has been involved in numerous extracurricular activities including choreographing the spring musicals and coaching Varsity Kickline.
She has chaperoned a dozen pilgrimages to Europe for over one hundred choral and orchestra performers. She is currently the advisor for the school's yearbook. She is also serving as the Internal Coordinator for the school's Middle States Evaluation in Fall 2010.



Chris Clarke
B.A., French, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada
M.A., Literary Translation French - English, NYU, New York, NY

Areas of Specialization: Translation studies, contemporary French literature, cinema studies, linguistics.

Chris is a second-year student in the French program. His is specializing in Translation Studies, as well as being particularly interested in French literature of the 20th and 21st centuries. Chris is also participating in the Film Studies Certificate program. His translations include work by Frédéric Beigbeder (Undergraduate Honours Thesis), Éric Chevillard (Masters Thesis), Pierre MacOrlan (Brooklyn Rail), Raymond Queneau (New Directions) and Olivier Salon (Words Without Borders). He is currently on exchange, studying at Paris-Sorbonne as well as teaching at Paris X Nanterre - IUT St Cloud Métiers du livre.

 

Deirdre Ellen Cutting
B.A., French and Psychology, St. John Fisher College
M. Phil., French, CUNY Graduate Center
Areas of Specialization: French cinema, European Union studies 

 

Wilson Décembre
Maîtrise de philosophie, Université de Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV)

Areas of specialization: philosophy and literature, Black Francophone culture and literature, Paganism (philosophy, arts and literature).

I was born in Jacmel, Haiti. After one year studying at L'Ecole Normale Supérieure de Port-au-Prince (année préparatoire de philosophie), I went to Paris where I earned a Maîtrise in Modern Philosophy. My thesis, supervised by Professor Patrick Wotling, was entitled: "L'Aliénation chez Feuerbach et Nietzsche : Essai sur deux philosophies de l'immanence."
I have published many articles. Most of them are about (or related to) philosophical topics. My main interest is paganism. How it is (and/or can be) lived, thought, developed, constructed… through different branches of culture such as: philosophy, the arts, literature, etc. Led by this spirit, I have written Vitalité et Spiritualité : Apologie du rapport-au-monde afro-haïtien (Paris: L'Harmattan, 2009), a book in which I point out how the Afro-haitian culture whose vodou (not "voodoo") is the cornerstone shows a broad and striking sympathy with life, a Dionysian sympathy (in the Nietzschean sense of the word). This is what I analyze through different aspects: the practical, the ethical, the esthetical and the (properly speaking) philosophical aspects.
I am a 4th year doctoral student and for my thesis I plan to analyze the pagan symbolism and "metaphorique" in Rene Depestre's literary work with the theoretical help of thinkers such as Nietzsche, Bataille, etc.
I have been teaching French as an adjunct at Pace University (New York) since 2005.
 
 

Paula S. DelBonis-Platt
B.S., Journalism, Boston University
M.A., French, University of Montana
Area of Specialization: 20th-21st Century French and Francophone Literature, Critical Theory, Feminism

Paula DelBonis-Platt is a Ph.D. candidate working on her dissertation, tentatively titled, “A Transnational View of the Francophone Second World: Voices from Central/Eastern Europe and China.” She has taught French at the University of Montana, French and English at a community college in Concord, NH, and English at the Université de Bourgogne. She developed the first online French course, using Wimba voice software, for the Community College System of New Hampshire in 2008, and will also be teaching online with the Virtual Learning Academy Charter School (VLACS) beginning in 2009. She is a freelance editor and copyeditor, and spent eight years at St. Martin’s Press (SMP). She has worked on such titles as The First Vietnam War (Atwood & Lovegall, Harvard UP), Imagining the Sacred Past: Hagiography and Power in Early Normandy (Herrick, Harvard UP), Conquering the Impossible (Horn, SMP), Fear and Trembling (Nothomb, SMP), The Adversary (Carrère, Picador), The Complete Jewish Guide to France (Kamins, SMP), Eastern Europe: A Traveler’s Companion (Méras, Mariner) and Frantz Fanon (Macey, SMP). She volunteers with refugees resettled through the UN High Commissioner on Refugees and has established a service-learning program for college students to gain practical language experience by assisting Francophone refugees in ESOL classes.
 
 

Claudy Delné
B.A., Histoire, Université de Montréal
M.ED, Université de Montréal
L.L.B., Université de Moncton

Né à Port-au-Prince (Haiti), Claudy Delné a fait ses études primaires à l'École Nationale Colbert Lochard et études secondaires au Lycée Anténor Firmin. Il a commencé ses études universitaires à l'École Normale Supérieure en Haiti (1988-1990). Au Québec depuis 1990, il a obtenu tour à tour un baccalauréat en enseignement de l'histoire et une maïtrise en Éducation à l'Université de Montréal. Il a obtenu également un baccalauréat en droit (L.L.B) de l'Université de Moncton (New-Brunswick, Canada) en 2000. Il a été admis au Barreau de l'Ontario (Canada) en 2002. Il a publié son premier ouvrage sur la didactique de l'enseignement de l'histoire qui s'intitule: "L'enseignement de l'histoire nationale en Haiti: état des lieux et perspectives" aux Éditions du CIDIHCA en 2001. Cette recherche lui a valu une mention spéciale en sciences sociales et humaines au concours des jeunes chercheurs parrainé conjointement par la Faculté des Études Supérieures et de la Recherche de l'Université de Moncton et l'ACFAS-Acadie (Association canadienne française pour l'avancement de la science), Mai 2000.
Il enseigne depuis 2003 le français au secondaire à NJ et à titre d'adjunct-teacher (chargé de cours) à Kean et Montclair State University. Il est candidat au doctorat au programme d'études françaises au Graduate Centre depuis 2005. Il s'intéresse particulièrement aux questions d'altérité, de représentations, de la race en littérature. Son projet de thèse portera sur l'évolution de la représentation de la Révolution haitienne dans les textes narratifs des écrivains français du dix-neuvième siècle.
 

Pierre Castro Desroches
B.A., French, Brooklyn College
M.A., French, Brooklyn College
Area of Specialization:
 
 

Lauren Donaldson
B.A., French Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Area of Specialization: 20th century French literature, Food Studies

Lauren Donaldson earned her undergraduate degree in French with a minor in European Area Studies from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. She is currently a 5th year student specializing in gastronomic texts of the interwar period. In addition, she is working toward her certificate in women's studies, exploring the image of women in regional culinary texts. In 2009 she presented a paper entitled "Exploring the Evolution of the Regional Culinary Discourse Through the Works of Curnonsky" at NYU and in March 2010, she presented a paper entitled "[En]gendering Chocolate Consumption: Ambivalent Effects on 17th Century Women" at Columbia. Lauren was awarded the Jeanne Marandon grant through the SPFFA during the summer of 2010 to research political and nationalistic discourses that appear in culinary writings on and by women during the interwar period in France. When Lauren is not reading about and researching food and wine, you will find her indulging in it around the city.
 

Allison Faris

M.A., European Society and Culture, New York University
B.A., French and English, Portland State University

Allison L. Faris is a first-year PhD student in French at the Graduate Center. She is interested in women writers and marginal genres/non-canonical texts of the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century, contemporary Francophone women writers of the Maghreb, gender theory and feminist scholarship.

 

 

Phillip Griffith
B.A., University of Georgia
M.A., Columbia University
M. Phil., The Graduate Center, CUNY

Area of Specialization: 20th/21st-century literature, literature and the other arts, 20th/21st-century American poetry, critical theory.

Phillip came to the CUNY Graduate Center after completing an M.A. in French Cultural Studies at Columbia University and a B.A. in English and French Literature at the University of Georgia. He is currently working on an interdisciplinary, comparative thesis on collaboration in and between the works of French writer/photographer Claude Cahun and American performance artist/poet Hannah Weiner. Phillip is the recipient of a DSRG travel-research grant in support of the dissertation.

Phillip has taught French language and literature at the City College of New York and Baruch College. He has presented work on artists/writers including Mallarmé, Robert Smithson, and Cyprien Gaillard; Claude Cahun and Hannah Weiner; and Suzanne Doppelt and Anne Portugal. In 2011, Phillip worked at New York City's Creative Time on the exhibition Living as Form. His poems have been published in La Petite Zine, Esque, N/A, and the CUNY Graduate Center Advocate, selected there by Wayne Koestenbaum as runner-up in the annual poetry contest.
 
 

Gorica Hadzic
B.A., French, Montclair State University
M.A., French, Montclair State University

Areas of Specialization: 19th century French literature, 19th century French avant-garde theater, les Nabis

Click here to see some of Gorica's paintings.

Gorica is currently writing her dissertation. Her main interest is in the contribution of French artists to the late 19th and early 20th century Parisian avant-garde theater. She has presented papers on Zola and Proust. Gorica also translated a website that features some of the most prominent French artists working today. (http://www.empreintes-fr.com/) . She is also the recipient of the CUNY Graduate Research Grant for 2007-2008.
 

Desmond Hosford
B.M., Harpsichord Performance, Manhattan School of Music
M.Phil., Musicology, Graduate Center of the City University of New York
Ph.D., Musicology, Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Areas of specialization: 17th- and 18th-century tragedy, tragédie en musique, the Bourbon court of France, animal philosophy, and early modern gender and sexuality.

Desmond's publications include: Fortune & Fatality: Performing the Tragic in Early Modern France (1553-1715) (ed. with Charles Wrightington, 2008), French Orientalism: Culture, Politics, and the Imagined Other (ed. with Chong J. Wojtkowski, 2010), "Uneasy Anthropocentrism: Cartesianism and the Ethics of Species Differentiation in Seventeenth-Century France" (JAC, 2010), "Anthropomorphic Terror: The Bête-Machine, the Ballet de Cour, and the Tragédie en Musique" (Music and Art, 2009), "'Regnorum Ruina': Cleopatra and the Oriental Menace in Early French Tragedy" (French Orientalism, 2010), "Reigning Women, Crushed Women: Duty, Glory, and Suicide in the Tragedies of Philippe Quinault" (Formes et formations au dix-septième siècle, ed. Buford Norman, 2006), "The Queen's Hair: Marie-Antoinette, Politics, and DNA" (Eighteenth-Century Studies, 2004), and the articles "Marie-Antoinette," "Opera," and "Queering Royalty" in The Gale Encyclopedia of Sex and Gender (ed. Fedwa Malti-Douglas, 2007). Desmond directed and performed in the American premiere of Jean Racine's Bajazet, a full production featuring 17th-century tragic gesture, staging, costume, and music. As a harpsichordist, he has directed performances of 17th- and 18th-century vocal and instrumental music with his period instruments ensemble, La Musique de la Reine, including a full production of Jean-Baptiste Lully's Armide. Desmond is an adjunct lecturer in French at Hunter College, an editor at the Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale, and the director of the Foundation for French and Francophone Musical Culture at the Graduate Center.

Lisa Karakaya
B.A., Hillsdale College
Languages: French, Spanish, basic Turkish, German reading knowledge

Areas of specialization: 20th-century French literature, class constructs and reflections in literature and language, representations of women in the postmodern novel, de-/reconstruction of self in postmodern literature

Lisa Karakaya is a fourth-year student and received a Women’s Studies certificate in fall 2013. She is working on intersections of oppression (gender, race, class) in the novels of selected women writers of the latter half of the 20th century. Lisa is particularly interested in reflections of class in 20th century literature, and in language and communication between social classes or between "les dominants" and "les dominé(e)s", to use Pierre Bourdieu's terms. She has also researched issues of reproductive justice and midwifery literature, and presented “A Speaking Absence: Contraception and Abortion in Midwifery Texts of the 17th Century” at the 2013 GC comparative literature conference. In 2012, she presented “Annie Ernaux’s Ecriture Plate: A Link Between Two Worlds,” at the “In Trans: Reading Between and Beyond” conference at the Graduate Center.

After graduating with a B.A. in French and Spanish from Hillsdale College, Michigan, Lisa taught English in France, and then worked in various fields, including publishing and finance, before starting a doctoral degree at CUNY. Lisa has taught French as a Graduate Teaching Fellow at Queens College since 2011 and at Baruch as an adjunct.



Lynn Karam
B.A., French, Montclair State University
M.A., French, Montclair State University
Languages: English, French and Arabic

Areas of Specialization: Middle Eastern Studies, Lebanese Women Writers

Lynn Karam is a 7th year doctoral student and is currently at the dissertation proposal stage in her research. She was born in Beirut, Lebanon and came to the States at the age of 12, hence her interest in Middle Eastern Literature, Music and Dance. She has completed some work in translation, which included the supervision of an Independent Study for a student completing her MA in Liberal Studies at the Graduate Center of CUNY. For this project, she edited translations from Arabic to English of a collection of poems by Saudi journalist and poet, Hani Naqshabandi. In addition, she collaborated on the translation from French to English of a collection of interviews with film director Arthur Penn for a book published in 2008 by Sticking Place Books. Lynn presented a paper on Orientalism in 17th Century French literature focusing on Madame de Villedieu’s Mémoires du Sérail sous Amurat II. This paper has been approved for publishing. Lynn is currently an Adjunct Instructor at Montclair State University. Lynn is also currently teaching French at Edison High School in Edison, NJ and completing a continuing education course to fulfill state requirements for secondary teaching certification.
 
 

Wednesday Knudsen
B.A., Drama, University of Washington

Area of Specialization:


 

Jacquelyn Libby
B.A., French, Sussex University, England

Area of Specialization: Albert Camus

Jacquelyn Libby is from England. She earned her BA in French and European Studies from the University of Sussex in Brighton.  Before moving to New York City, she taught English, French and Spanish in Paris and Barcelona.  She is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the Graduate Center, City University of New York writing her thesis on the French Algerian writer and journalist Albert Camus.
 

 

Ruth Lipman
B.A., English, SUNY at Stony Brook
M.L.S., Library Science, Pratt Institute
M.A., Education and Reading, New York University
M.Phil, French, CUNY Graduate Center

Areas of Specialization: 20th century French literature, trauma studies, memory

Ruth became a full-time student at the Graduate Center when she retired from her teaching position in the New York City public school system. She taught English and reading at Park East High School in East Harlem where she also served as coordinator of the reading program and coordinator of the English department. In 2010 she presented a paper, "Voices Silenced, Voices Reclaimed," at a conference at the Graduate Center. Ruth is particularly interested in the representation of trauma in French literature written after 1968. Her dissertation is entitled “The Journey Back: Revisiting Childhood Trauma.” In her spare time, she enjoys music and gardening.


Dana Loev
B.A. Psychology, Loyola University, New Orleans
M.A. French Literature, Hunter College

Area of Specialization:

 

 

Eric Lynch
B.A., French and English, Rutgers University (2005).
M. Phil., French, The Graduate Center, CUNY (2013).

Areas of Specialization: Contemporary French Poetry, World and Image Studies, Contemporary French Novels, Critical Theory.

Eric Lynch’s thesis, Unidentified Verbal Objects: Contemporary French Poetry, Mass Media and Technology, centers on contemporary French experimental poetry. Recent publications include an excerpt from his dissertation, “Olivier Cadiot, or A Portrait of the Artist as ‘Auto- Usine’” (L’Esprit créateur, spring 2014), and a poetic work, “Sonnet : Le vierge, le vivace, et le beau aujourd'hui” (Nioques # 12). His other projects include assisting at the 2014 20th 21st Century French and Francophone Studies International Colloquium. He currently teaches at Hunter College and Fordham University.

 

Amy Martin
B.A., French, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH
M.A., French, Hunter College, New York, NY
Languages: English, French, Spanish

Areas of Specialization: 17th Century, Women's Studies, Children's Literature, Narratology, Adaptations

Amy is a fifth year doctoral student interested in fairy tales and their contemporary retellings. She presented a paper in Feb. 2011 on the female in Perrault's tales called, "The Modernist and the Misogynist: Ambiguities in the Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault," and is currently working on the proposal for her dissertation, tentatively titled, "Unnatural Issue: Peau d'ane as Narrative Framework in Contemporary French and English Texts."

Amy is currently a Writing Fellow at Kingsborough Community College and works as a research assistant and copy editor for Dr. Domna Stanton. In addition, she is the French program representative and the Co-Chair for Student Affairs of the Doctoral Students' Council.
  
 

Hiroshi Matsui
B.A., Liberal Arts, International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan
M.A., Comparative Culture, International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan

Area of Specialization:

Thomas Muzart
M.A., Sciences Po Lyon

Areas of Specialization: 19th and 20th century literature, gender studies, queer studies, travel literature.

Thomas Muzart earned his Masters degree at Sciences Po Lyon in Communications and Culture. His studies in France led him to work on cultural activism and queer studies, especially in his thesis, entitled Les festivals de cinema gay et lesbien en France : le militantisme culturel en question. After working for several theatre companies in New York and Paris, he decided to combine his academic and professional interests to further question issues identity and performance. He is also interested in travel literature in the 19th and 20th centuries. He published several articles on gender studies for the online magazine non.fiction, and he recently presented a paper entitled “Jean Genet et le roman  : une idiosyncrasie romanesque pour une idiosyncrasie identitaire” at the annual French department's conference at CUNY. He is currently teaching French at Queens College and City College. 

 

Marie-Jasmine Narcisse
B.A., Pharmacy, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Certificat en Linguistique, Centre de Linguistique, Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Areas of Specialization: Haitian Literature, Autobiography, Memory

Jasmine has worked as a journalist and media producer, a translator, a copywriter, and an art director... When she is asked about the unexpected path from an original diploma in Pharmacy and her steadfast career in linguistics and communication, she vigorously argues that no one (and, most of all in Haiti, where options are so scarce) should be forced to choose a career at 18. Actually, in her recent settlement in New York, she decided within many options, to finally reconcile her many "hers" by focusing on what was common in all of her activities: the text.
She is interested in the construction of the self in personal memory writing in Haitian Literature. She spends herself between her course of study, teaching French at York College (CUNY), and the promotion of the Haitian Book Centre for the diffusion of Haitian (and Francophone) literature outside Haiti.
Her publications include Mémoire de Femmes (link), Germaine ou Chercher la vie...
 
 

Laila Pedro
B.A., French, Connecticut College
Languages: Spanish and French

Laila Pedro is a 6th-year student at the Graduate Center; she is currently writing her dissertation on artistic relationships between French, Francophone and Cuban artists. She is also avidly interested in translation, poetry and poetics, dance, and all manner of performance and body art. Laila has presented her work at "Rethinking the Mangrove: Second Symposium of Critical Practices of Caribbean Cultural Studies" at the University of Puerto Rico; "Bodies," the12th Annual Comparative Literature Conference at the University of South Carolina, Columbia; at the Carolina Conference on Romance Literatures at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; at the International Conference on Body Image and Identity, and at Association of Writers and Writing Programs Annual Conference. She writes regularly on the arts in New York for Idiom, an online arts magazine.
 
 

Joseph Rienti
B.A., International Political Economy and French, Fordham University
M.A., Humanities and Sciences, Fordham
University
Areas of Specialization: 19th Century Literature,
Cultural Studies, French Gastronomy

Director of International and Study Abroad Programs at Fordham University in New York, Joe studied abroad at the Université de Paris, Sorbonne for one year while pursuing his BA in International Political Economy and French from Fordham University. Upon graduating in 2002, Joe taught high school English at Lycée Charles le Chauve in Roissy-en-Brie, France as part of an Ambassade de France and Fulbright Commission partnership. He has also worked as a Financial Aid counselor at Fordham. Mr. Rienti holds an MA in Humanities and Sciences from Fordham's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and is currently pursuing a PhD in French at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He has travelled throughout France and the Francophone world. Joe is also an adjunct instructor of French at Fordham University.
 

Sara Rychtarik

B.A., English and French Studies, Barnard College

Sara Rychtarik was born in Louisiana and spent her childhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma and Sydney, Australia. She graduated from Barnard College, where she received a Bachelor of Arts in English and French Studies.

Sara has also studied at the International Center of Photography and the Center for Book Arts. She has worked extensively in film, music, and photographic production, producing several short films, as well as a television series.

During her career in production Sara managed the production office of renowned musician and artist, John Lurie, as well as the photography studio of fashion photographer and music video director Stéphane Sednaoui.

Sara is a fine art and documentary photographer. She has photographed for such publications as Details and Black Book, and her work has been included in several solo and group exhibitions, including the “Queens International 2006” at the Queens Museum of Art. Sara was awarded a grant from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and Queens Council on the Arts for her series Queens Plaza.

In 2013, Sara began her studies in the French doctoral program at the Graduate Center, where she is pursuing studies in medieval French literature.

Anna Soo-Hoo

B.A., English with a minor in French, City College CUNY
M.A., French Literature, Hunter College CUNY

Anna will specialize in the 16th century. For her master’s thesis, she wrote about the notion of female honor in the works of Madeleine des Roches. After having enjoyed learning German and Latin, Anna plans to learn a bit of Greek. For some years at the Poetry Outreach Center of City College CUNY, she translated poems that were written by junior high and high school students from the south of France (Cagnes-sur-Mer, Nice, Saint-Dalmas-de-Tende). In the world of English, she also writes poems, some of which have been published. She is halfway towards having enough poems for her first book.

John Sorrentino
B.A., French Translation, Montclair State University
M.A., French Literature, Hunter College
M.Phil., French, CUNY Graduate Center

Area of Specialization: Works of André Gide, Queer Theory, 19th Century French Novel

John F. Sorrentino is a PhD Candidate in French Literature at the CUNY Graduate Center. His dissertation is entitled "Gide in the First Person: The 'I' of Religion and Same-Sex Sexuality." He has taught French language courses throughout CUNY and is currently teaching French at John Jay College of Criminal Justice as well as an online French course for NHTI, Concord's Community College in New Hampshire. As a Macaulay Honors College Instructional Technolgy Fellow, John worked for three years at Brooklyn College before joining the central team in 2009.

Click here for John's site Reading Gide.


 

Liza Tripp
M. Phil, French, Graduate Center
B.A., French, Barnard College
Certificate in French-English Translation, NYU.
Languages: French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English

Website: www.lizatripp.com
Area of Specialization: Translation

Liza Tripp is currently working on her dissertation, which is tentatively entitled “Word-View: Cultural and Linguistic Subjectivity in the Translation of Virginia Woolf’s Inanimate World.” She has been a professional freelance translator of French, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese into English for 9 years. Professionally, she handles legal, financial and technical translations for use in litigation and other legal matters. Academically, she is interested in the practice of literary translation as well as translation, reception and language theory. Recent publications include an Italian-to-English translation of Tamar Pitch’s book on gender and prevention, La società della prevenzione, and a review of Michael Cronin’s Translation Goes to the Movies for a special issue of the LSE Graduate Journal of Social Science. Liza resides in Centerport, NY with her two daughters Lorelei and Ariel, her husband Noel and their two dictionary-eating dogs. 

Marguerite Van Cook
L.S. M. A., Modern European Studies, Columbia University (2011)
B.A. Magna cum Laude, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University (2008)
A.A. English (Hons), Borough of Manhattan Community College, (2006)
Newcastle upon Tyne Polytechnic, Fine Art Undergraduate (1975-1977)
Portsmouth College of Art and Design, Foundation Studies (1973-1974)

Areas of Interest: The Long Eighteenth Century in France and England; History of Western Political Economics; Romanticism; Aesthetics; Nineteenth Century Literature; Comics; Film; Theatre & Performance; Women’s & GLBT Studies.

Marguerite Van Cook is a second year student whose recent work looks at the intersection of political economics and literature, and the politics of gender. Van Cook came to New York with her punk band The Innocents after touring with The Clash. She stayed, opened the gallery Ground Zero, and curated numerous events and shows. Her own work as an artist and filmmaker placed her in many museum collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum and the Schwartz Art Collection at Harvard. Her other credits include poet (she was awarded the Van Rensselear Prize while at Columbia), writer, critic, comic book artist and actor. Her collaborative project with David Wojnarowicz and James Romberger, “Seven Miles a Second,” a graphic memoir of Wojnarowicz’s life and death, was published in France in 2012 and is in its second edition in America. In 2006, Van Cook became the creative and managing director of the Howl! Arts Festival, an annual all-ages, multicultural, LGBT-friendly arts festival, which led in 2009 to the establishment of Howl HELP, a free emergency health & care service for downtown artists.

Antoinette Williams
B.A., French, University of Houston
B.A., English and Creative Writing,
University of Houston

Areas of Specialization: Translation Studies and Francophone Identity in literature and language, specifically involving 20th century and contemporary texts from North Africa and Québéc

Antoinette Williams is a third-year French Department student whose academic interests have focused on everything from North African francophone literature and women's rights in the Franco-Arab world to Québécois Identity in literature, language and translation. She presented a paper in February 2011 for the Graduate Center Collective Identities Conference called, "A Call to Action: Algerian Women on the Verge of Autonomy in Assia Djebar's Les enfants du nouveau monde." Antoinette has served as a student representative to the French department's Executive Committee for the past two years. She also teaches French at Hunter College and spends her summers working in Paris as Assistant to the Director of an international study abroad program.
 
 
 

Ashley Williard
M.Phil., French, Graduate Center, CUNY (2012)
B.A., Liberal Arts, Hampshire College (2007)

Areas of Specialization: Atlantic Studies, Caribbean Studies, Early Modern Gender, Second Language Acquisition and Digital Media, Seventeenth-Century French Culture and Literature, Translation Studies

Ashley is a doctoral candidate in the French Program, where her dissertation, Engendering Islands, analyzes representations of difference in the seventeenth-century French Caribbean. She has carried out archival research in France, Guadeloupe and Martinique and presented several papers on this topic, most recently at the Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention in Boston, Massachusetts (March 2013) and the Séminaire d'Histoire de l'Amérique Coloniale at the Université de Reims (December 2013). Since 2008, Ashley has taught French throughout CUNY, and during the 2010-2011 academic year, she taught English in Le Moule, Guadeloupe. Ashley worked on interdisciplinary writing pedagogy as a Writing Across the Curriculum Fellow at York College (2011-2012) and has cultivated her interest in teaching with digital media in the New Media Lab (2013) and the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate Program (2012-present). Thanks to the support of a CUNY Graduate Center Dissertation Fellowship, she is writing her dissertation in Paris during the 2013-2014 academic year.
 
 

Timothy E. Wilson
M.Phil. French, CUNY Graduate Center (2012)
B.A. French, University of Vermont (2006)
B.A. Jazz, University of Vermont (2006)

Areas of Specialization: French Film and TV, 19th and 20th Century French Literature, Disability Studies, Second Language Pedagogy

A seventh-year doctoral candidate, Tim's dissertation examines old age in French art cinema. Currently at Marymount Manhattan College, he has taught all levels of French and Modern French Civilization at Hunter College (2008-2012) and the College of Staten Island (2012-2013). In 2011-2012, he completed a Graduate Writing Fellowship at LaGuardia Community College. He also holds a Research Assistant position with the Insitute for Language Education in Transcultural Context and has served as the webmaster for the Ph.D. Program in French since 2011.

Tim has presented his research at several professional and graduate academic conferences over the past few years, including the Society for French Historical Studies, the 20th and 21st Century French and Francophone Studies International Colloquium, Yale University, and Brown University. In 2011 and 2013, he also acted as lead organizer for the Ph.D. Program in French's annual graduate conference, collaborating with Chris Brandon in 2011 for a conference on "Collective Identities" with a keynote by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and with Chris Brandon and Eric Lynch in 2013 for a conference on "Idiosyncrasy / Idiosyncrasie" with a keynote by Françoise Lionnet.

Tim's interests extend beyond the university setting as well. Presently a Development Intern with Museum of the Moving Image, he is pursuing a career in nonprofit fundraising with an emphasis on arts organizations to complement his professorial ambitions.

Email: twilson@gc.cuny.edu
Twitter: @franglophonic

Patricia Winter
B.A. French and Anthropology, Hunter College

Patricia Anne Winter, a native New Yorker, is a third year doctoral student in French. A former dancer, choreographer, and trapezist, Ms. Winter was part of la nouvelle dance française movement in the 1980s, and the New York avant-garde dance scene in the 1990s. In France, she taught dance in several conservatories, as well as to medical students at the Faculté de Médecine in Paris. In 1994, she had a residency at the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes in Mexico City, where she created two choreographies after having done research on women artists working in Mexico, such as Frida Kahlo, Remedios Varo, and Tina Modotti. Concurrently she conducted dance workshops in the Escuela Nacional de Ciegos (National School of the Blind).

Ms. Winter earned her BA in Anthropology, Special Honors, and French from Hunter College in 2010. In 2011 she was a guest lecturer in Hunter College's Arts Across the Curriculum Program and spoke about about contemporary dance in America. In 2013 she participated in a panel discussion on dance and the body politic for the graduate program in anthropology at Hunter College.

Ms. Winter has a special interest in the performing body, dance, and aesthetics in 17th C. France, postmodern dance in New York, and the Surrealist movement.

She currently teaches French at Brooklyn College and Hunter College. She is also working on a dance theater piece to be presented in Copenhagen.