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Program Events

Events


Thursday-Saturday, March 6-8, 2014: 20th/21st Century French and Francophone Studies Colloquium on "Argent-Money." Co-organized with the French programs of Columbia and NYU. The colloquium proceedings will take place at the Graduate Center on Friday, March 7.

Monday, March 10, 2014: "Possession and Inspiration – Between the Psyche and the Spirits: A Conversation between Therapy and Vodou," with Gina Athena Ulysse and Craig E. Stephenson, moderated by Jerry W. Carlson. Rooms 6:30pm in Rooms 9204/9205.

Wednesday, March 12, 2014: Part One of the "Impunity, Responsibility and Citizenship – HAITI" interdisciplinary seminar organized by The Henri Peyre French Institute: "Rendre compte. Demander comptes. Paths and Voices for Justice and Catharsis in Haitian Literature." Roundtable with Michèle Montas and J-P. Richard Narcisse. 5pm-8pm in Room 9206.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014: “The Last Hapsburg Poet: Paul Celan’s Love Poetry and the Limits of Language,” a lecture by Marjorie Perloff (Professor Emerita of English at Stanford University and Florence R. Scott Professor of English Emerita at the University of Southern California). Martin E. Segal Theatre. 6:30pm.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014: Atelier XVI siècle. Organization: M. Huchon, University Paris-Sorbonne; B. Renner, CUNY. Martin E. Segal Theatre. 9am-5:30pm.

Friday, April 4, 2014: April 4: Part Two of the "Impunity, Responsibility and Citizenship – HAITI" interdisciplinary seminar organized by The Henri Peyre French Institute: "Haiti Impunity: A Visual Account." Digital Exhibit and Projection Curator and commentator: Frantz Voltaire. Photos, documents and artefacts. Launching of the digital exhibit on the Henri Peyre French Institute website. Projection of the documentary film Le règne de l'impunité by Arnold Antonin. 5pm-8pm in Rooms C201-202.

Wednesday, April 9, 2014: Part One of the Food, Power, Exchange and Identity: Food and Foodstuffs in the French and Francophone Worlds, an interdisciplinary seminar organized by the Henri Peyre French Institute: The Discourse of Food from the 19th Century to the Inter-war Period. 5pm-7pm in Room 9206.

Friday, April 11, 2014: "Transgression and Subversive Performativity," the Annual Graduate Conference of the Ph.D. Program in French. Martin E. Segal Theatre. Website.

Friday, May 2, 2014: Part Three of the "Impunity, Responsibility and Citizenship – HAITI" interdisciplinary seminar organized by The Henri Peyre French Institute: "Haïti Hors-la-loi." Disparity between Haitian Law and state decisions and actions. The State against Society. Historicity. Reception and effect. Lecture and discussion Speaker: Laennec Hurbon. 5pm-8pm in the Skylight Room (9100).

Event Descriptions



Thursday-Saturday, March 6-8, 2014: 20th/21st Century French and Francophone Studies Colloquium on "Argent-Money." Co-organized with the French programs of Columbia and NYU. The colloquium proceedings will take place at the Graduate Center on Friday, March 7. Website and direct link to the program.

Extrait de l'appel à communications du colloque : "Ce colloque met l’accent sur les rôles que jouent l’argent, l’économie, la dépense, les crises financières et la répartition économique—juste ou injuste—dans la littérature, les cultures visuelles, le théâtre, l’histoire, la théorie, la traduction et l’étude de la sexualité et de l’ethnicité au sein des études françaises et francophones des 20e et 21e siècles. Les crises financières de 2008 ont lancé un débat de plus en plus étendu sur l’importance du gain financier dans la production culturelle et dans les systèmes universitaires dans le monde. Ces crises remettent en cause les rapports entre le capitalisme et la culture. Ainsi s’ouvrent des luttes de pouvoirs idéologique, culturelle et morale. Ce colloque se veut un lieu de discussion au sujet du rôle de l’argent dans la littérature, les formes esthétiques, les traductions, les méthodologies et même les programmes d’étude de nos propres universités du début du 20e siècle jusqu’à nos jours."

Monday, March 10, 2014: "Possession and Inspiration – Between the Psyche and the Spirits: A Conversation between Therapy and Vodou," with Gina Athena Ulysse and Craig E. Stephenson, moderated by Jerry W. Carlson. Rooms 6:30pm in Rooms 9204/9205.

Please RSVP to ma.americas@ccny.cuny.edu (This is only to gauge food for the reception. The event is first-come. Also be sure to bring a photo i.d. for building security.Thanks!)

Gina Athena Ulysse was born in Pétion-Ville, Haiti. Trained as a cultural anthropologist, an associate professor at Wesleyan University and author ofDowntown Ladies: Informal Commercial Importers, a Haitian Anthropologist and Self-Making in Jamaica (University of Chicago Press), she is also a performance artist and multi-media artist. Her work weaves history, statistics, personal narrative, theory, with Vodou chants to dramatize and address issues of social (in)justice, intersectional identities, spirituality and the dehumanization of Haitians and other marked bodies. She is currently developing a performance-installation project VooDooDoll, What If Haiti Were a Woman: On ti Travay sou 21 Pwen or An Alter(ed)native in Something Other than Fiction, which will debut at Encuentro in Montreal this June.

Craig E. Stephenson, author of Possession: Jung’s Comparative Anatomy of the Psyche (Routledge, 2009), Anteros: A Forgotten Myth (Routledge, 2011), and Jung and Moreno: Essays on the Theatre of Human Nature (Routledge, 2013), is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich, the Institute for Psychodrama in Zumikon, and the Centre for Psychoanalytic Studies, University of Essex. He is a Jungian analyst in private practice.

Jerry W. Carlson is chair of the Department of Media and Communication Arts where he also directs the Cinema Studies Program. He is a member of the doctoral faculty in the Ph.D. Programs of Comparative Literature, French, and Film Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, as well as a Senior Fellow of the Bildner Center for Western Hemispheric Studies. Moreover, he is a multiple Emmy award-winning Senior Producer for City University Television (CUNY-TV). He created and produces the series CITY CINEMATHEQUE about film history, CANAPE about French-American cultural relations, and NUEVA YORK (in Spanish) about the Latino cultures of New York City. Special Thanks This event is co-sponsored by the MA in the Study of the Americas at Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the City College of New York’s Center for Worker Education and the PhD Program in French at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. It is funded by the PSC-CUNY Research Award Program, for a specific project titled: “An Island and Two Metropoles: The Dominican Republic, Haiti, New York, and Paris.”

Wednesday, March 12, 2014: Part One of the "Impunity, Responsibility and Citizenship – HAITI" interdisciplinary seminar organized by The Henri Peyre French Institute: "Rendre compte. Demander comptes. Paths and Voices for Justice and Catharsis in Haitian Literature." Roundtable with Michèle Montas and J-P. Richard Narcisse. 5pm-8pm in Room 9206.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014: “The Last Hapsburg Poet: Paul Celan’s Love Poetry and the Limits of Language,” a lecture by Marjorie Perloff (Professor Emerita of English at Stanford University and Florence R. Scott Professor of English Emerita at the University of Southern California). Martin E. Segal Theatre. 6:30pm.

Paul Celan is usually regarded as the quintessential Holocaust poet—a poet whose mature years were spent in France, but who wrote his poetry, not in French, but in his native German—a German he so resented as the language of his oppressors that he had to reinvent it. But what happens when we look at Celan’s poetic language, especially his love lyric, elliptical and oblique as it is, in the context of its actual history and geography? Celan was, after all, not German, but Austrian and received a classical German education, as authorized by the centralized k. & k. (kaiserlich und königlich) government of the Hapsburg Empire. This lecture will reconsider the language of his earlier love poetry, in the light of Celan’s astonishing correspondence with the Austrian poet Ingeborg Bachmann. Join distinguished literary critic Marjorie Perloff as she takes a fresh look at Celan’s poetic practice.

Marjorie Perloff is a poetry scholar and critic who teaches courses and writes on twentieth and now twenty-first century poetry and poetics, both Anglo-American and from a Comparatist perspective, as well as on intermedia and the visual arts. She is Professor Emerita of English at Stanford University and Florence R. Scott Professor of English Emerita at the University of Southern California. She is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society.

Sponsored by the Center for the Humanities. Cosponsored by the Henri Peyre French Institute. Link to event page on the Center for Humanities website.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014: Atelier XVI siècle. Organization: M. Huchon, University Paris-Sorbonne; B. Renner, CUNY. Martin E. Segal Theatre. 9am-5:30pm.

Programme
9h00 - Ouverture
Tables rondes animées par Mireille Huchon, Université Paris-Sorbonne, et Domna Stanton, CUNY
9h30 - «Méthodes et méthodologie: entre philologie et échanges culturels»
Marie-Claire Thomine, Université Paris-Sorbonne
Claude La Charité, Université du Québec à Rimouski
Tom Conley, Harvard University
11h00 - « Actualité de la Renaissancee »
Daniele Maira, Université de Göttingen
Véronique Duché, Université de Melbourne
Dominique Bertrand, Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand
12h30 - Pause déjeuner
14h00 - « Itinéraire(s) de chercheur » : François Cornilliat, Rutgers University
15h30 - «Nouvelles perspectives et chantiers en cours», sous la présidence de Bernd Renner, CUNY
Anne-Pascale Pouey-Mounou (Université de Lille) avec la participation de Roland Béhar (Université de Lille) et d’Olivier Pédeflous (Fondation Thiers, Université Paris-Sorbonne): « Poétique de l’épithète »
Colette Winn, Washington University at St. Louis : « Femmes écrivains de la Renaissance française »
Répondant: Francesca Sautman, CUNY
17h00 - Clôture

Friday, April 4, 2014: Part Two of the "Impunity, Responsibility and Citizenship – HAITI" interdisciplinary seminar organized by The Henri Peyre French Institute: "Haiti Impunity: A Visual Account." Digital Exhibit and Projection Curator and commentator: Frantz Voltaire. Photos, documents and artefacts. Launching of the digital exhibit on the Henri Peyre French Institute website. Projection of the documentary film Le règne de l'impunité by Arnold Antonin. 5pm-8pm in Rooms C201-202.

Wednesday, April 9, 2014: Part One of the Food, Power, Exchange and Identity: Food and Foodstuffs in the French and Francophone Worlds, an interdisciplinary seminar organized by the Henri Peyre French Institute: The Discourse of Food from the 19th Century to the Inter-war Period. 5pm-7pm in Room 9206.

Panel discussion: Prof. Julia Przybos will speak on "De l'imagination physiologique", Dr. Joseph Rienti will speak on the "Place of the Restaurant in the Literary Culture of the Second Half of the 19th Century, and Lauren K. Christensen (doctoral candidate, Ph.D. Program in French, The graduate Center) will speak on "Cuisine as Nation: Regional Food, National Identity, and French Gastronomical Writing (1918-1940)."

Friday, April 11, 2014: "Transgression and Subversive Performativity," the Annual Graduate Conference of the Ph.D. Program in French. Martin E. Segal Theatre. Website.

From the conference CFP: "The concept of transgression has emerged, primarily, within the field of ethnology and anthropology in order to formalize unusual or extreme experiences (like sacrifices, for example) – experiences in which the norms of a given society (or community) are lifted, debunked or turned upside down (under certain conditions). With thinkers such as Marcel Mauss, Roger Caillois, or Georges Bataille, the concept of transgression became, then, a powerful tool to think, in a new way (with and against the psychoanalytical discourse), the conflictual relations between the collective (and its sets of norms) and the individual (with its need to express repressed energy). Later, with a thinker like Foucault, the concept of transgression became the very core of a new kind of dialectic (and writing) – a dialectic that would not be subordinate to the idea of a repressed energy, or more generally, to the idea of negativity. On the contrary, transgression, for Foucault, became the name of a new ontology based on a critical and historical approach to norms. Finally, within the field of gender and queer studies, transgression seems to have become the subtext on which the idea of “subversive performativity” has built its own discourse–a discourse that is, at the same time, highly critical towards transgression (for being the ultimate and paradoxical legitimation of the heterosexual matrix) and deeply influenced by it (especially when it comes to proposing a new model of subjectivity that could go beyond the Hegelian model of recognition). The aim of this conference is to explore the notion of transgression, its becoming, its limits, and its possible future within the field of queer and feminist studies as a possible source of agency..."

Friday, May 2, 2014: Part Three of the "Impunity, Responsibility and Citizenship – HAITI" interdisciplinary seminar organized by The Henri Peyre French Institute: "Haïti Hors-la-loi." Disparity between Haitian Law and state decisions and actions. The State against Society. Historicity. Reception and effect. Lecture and discussion Speaker: Laennec Hurbon. 5pm-8pm in the Skylight Room (9100).