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Faculty and Staff

Faculty

The following is a listing of the faculty that are currently and have in the past taught in the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Ceritificate Program.

Pennee Bender
Stephen Brier
Joshua Brown
Patricia Clough
Matthew K. Gold
Joan Greenbaum
David Greetham
Carlos Hernandez
Gerhard Joseph
Kimon Keramidas
Michael Mandiberg
George Otte
Anthony Picciano
Christopher Stein
Joe Ugoretz
Luke Waltzer
Adrianne Wortzel

Staff

Sonia K. González


Dr. Stephen Brier
ITP Certificate Program Coordinator
Ph.D. Program in Urban Education
The Graduate Center
Email: sbrier@gc.cuny.edu
Assistant: Sonia K. González
Email: sgonzalez1@gc.cuny.edu

Dr. Stephen Brier founded the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate Program at The Graduate Center in 2002 and serves as its Coordinator. He is a historian and a member of the doctoral faculty in Urban Education who has published widely in text, video, and various forms of multimedia on issues from U.S. history to the uses of interactive technology to improve teaching and learning. He was the founding director of The Graduate Center’s American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning and was the executive producer of the award-winning “Who Built America?” multimedia curriculum, including textbooks, videos, and CD-ROMs. He has co-produced other award-winning websites, including “History Matters” and the “September 11 Digital Archive”. Brier, who previously served for eleven years as a senior administrator at The Graduate Center, is also that institution’s Senior Academic Technology Officer and the co-director of its New Media Lab.


 

Pennee Bender
American Social History Project &
Center for Media & Learning
Email: pbender@gc.cuny.edu

Pennee Bender is Associate Director of the American Social History Project and Center for Media and Learning. She has worked in educational media for more than twenty years as a multimedia and video producer, director, and editor. She has a Ph.D. in American History from New York University, is on the faculty of the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Program at the Graduate Center, CUNY, teaches U.S. history at the Cornell Institute for Industrial and Labor Relations and has taught history and media production to students from elementary school through college.


Joshua Brown
Center for Media and Learning
The Graduate Center
Email: jbrown@gc.cuny.edu
Website

Joshua Brown is executive director of the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning, co-director of the New Media Lab, and professor of history at The Graduate Center, CUNY. He co-authored and co-directed ASHP/CML's award-winning Who Built America? textbooks, documentaries, and CD-ROMs, as well as its digital and Web projects, including History Matters: The U.S. Survey on the Web, The Lost Museum: Exploring Antebellum Life and Culture, The September 11 Digital Archive, and Picturing U.S. History. He is author of Beyond the Lines: Pictorial Reporting, Everyday Life, and the Crisis of Gilded Age America (2002) and The Hungry Eye (a serialized online historical novel), co-author of Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction (2005), and co-editor of History from South Africa: Alternative Visions and Practices (1993). He has written numerous essays and reviews on the history of U.S. visual culture, and his cartoons and illustrations appear in popular, scholarly and digital publications, including his weekly online commentary Life during Wartime..


Patricia Clough
Ph.D. Program in Sociology
The Graduate Center
Email: pclough@gc.cuny.edu

Patricia Ticineto Clough is professor of Sociology and Women’s Studies at the Graduate Center and Queens College of the City University of New York. She is author of Autoaffection: Unconscious Thought in the Age of Teletechnology (2000); Feminist Thought: Desire, Power and Academic Discourse (1994) and The End(s) of Ethnography: From Realism to Social Criticism (1998). She is editor of The Affective Turn: Theorizing the Social, (2007). Clough’s work has drawn on theoretical traditions concerned with technology, affect, unconscious processes, timespace and political economy. She is currently working on Ecstatic Corona an ethnographic historical research and experimental writing project about where she grew up in Queens New York. Clough is joined by students at Queens College who also are doing work on where they live in Queens.


Matthew K. Gold
Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities
The Graduate Center & City Tech
Email: mgold@gc.cuny.edu
Website

Matt is Assistant Professor of English at New York City College of Technology and a member of the CUNY Graduate Center doctoral faculty in the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate Program. His teaching and research interests center on the digital humanities, multimodal writing, open-source pedagogy, network theory, and new-media studies. Matt's recent work includes an essay on aesthetics, linearity, and rationality in online writing environments that will appear in the collection From A to <A>: Keywords of Markup (Minnesota, 2010) and an interview with Bob Stein on the future of the book that is forthcoming in Kairos. His current book project, Cultures of Proof, contextualizes the visual culture of mid-nineteenth century America within scientific and religious discourses of proof and objectivity. Matt is Project Director of Looking for Whitman: The Poetry of Place in the Life and Work of Walt Whitman, an experiment in online multi-campus pedagogy funded by two Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants from the NEH Office of Digital Humanities. Matt is also Project Director of the CUNY Academic Commons, an open-source academic social network dedicated to building community across CUNY’s 23 campuses.


Joan Greenbaum
Ph.D. Program in Environmental Psychology
The Graduate Center & LaGuardia
Email: joanbaum@ix.netcom.com

Joan Greenbaum has dabbled with technology since getting hooked on programming in the early computer days. Her research and work currently focuses on issues of interactive design and embodied action. She has written extensively on concerns dealing with work and technology as well as technology and gender. Among publications she is author of: Windows on the Workplace (Monthly Review Press, 2004); Design at Work (Erlbaum Press, 1991) and In the Name of Efficiency (Temple University Press, 1979). She currently teaches in Environmental Psychology with courses such as "Mobile Technology and Everyday Life" and "Interactive Environments".


David Greetham
Ph.D. Program in English
The Graduate Center
Email: david.greetham@gmail.com

David Greetham is Distinguished Professor in the Ph.D. Program in English, and the Certificate Programs in Medieval Studies and Interactive Technology and Pedagogy. His main interests are in the cultural and technical transmission of texts (from ancient times to the present) and in the effects of the medium on the construction and reception of texts. He is the author of Theories of the Text, Textual Trangressions, Textual Scholarship and other books and articles. He has lectured on electronic textuallity in The Hague, Oxford (the Computing Centre), Innsbruck, London, Liverpool, Canberra, Calgary, ATINER (Athens), NCMS (Helsinki)" and throughout the U.S., and has contributed to such collections as Electronic Text (ed. Katherine Sutherland). His special concerns are with the [in]stability of identity in electronic media, and thus in such phenomena as digital morphing. He is currently working on problems of intellectual property and copyright in electronic environments.


Carlos Hernandez
Associate Professor of English
The Graduate Center & BMCC
Email: chernandez@bmcc.cuny.edu

Carlos is Associate Professor of English at Borough of Manhattan Community College and a member of the CUNY Graduate Center doctoral faculty in the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate Program. Carlos Hernandez earned his Ph.D. in English from Binghamton University in 2000. His interests include procedural rhetoric, information design, productive play, new narrative forms and game-based learning. He is a co-founder of the CUNY Games Network, the CUNY-wide network of faculty who theorize and apply best practices to game-based learning, and of the CUNY Games Festival, the first conference on game-based learning focused specifically on postsecondary education. In terms of his own game-based work, Carlos is the lead writer and a game designer on Meriwether, a grant- and Kickstarter-funded CRPG about the Lewis and Clark expedition (meriwethergame.com), has an original board game under contract, and has served as a consultant on numerous other game projects. Carlos is also an sf writer and member of the Science Fiction Writers of America, with over two-dozen works of science fiction and fantasy to his credit.

Gerhard Joseph
Ph.D. Program in English
The Graduate Center
Email: gerhard.joseph@gte.net

As an English professor, Gerhard Joseph's participation in the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate program might be justified by a "two culture" interest in the dialogue of literature, in the widest sense, and what Donna Haraway calls "technoscience," though the courses he teaches in the Spring semester of 2009, arbitrarily tries to keep science and technology apart. One, entitled "Aestheticizng Science" considers the fictional uses of thermodynamics, ballistics, the history of mathematics, molecular biology, chaos theory, genetics, digital theory, string theory, etc, in the postmodern novels of Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, Richard Powers and others. A second, called "Technological Change and Letters," considers the impact of 20th and 21st century technologies such as the automobile, television, film, and the digital revolution upon selected American and British fictions.
 


Kimon Keramidas
Email: kimon@keramidas.com

Kimon Keramidas recently received his PhD in Theatre from the CUNY Graduate Center.  While at the Graduate Center he also completed the CUNY Graduate Center's Certificate in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy.  Kimon's research focuses on digital media through the lenses of political economy and sociology of culture with a particular focus on intellectual property, information access, and video gaming.  Kimon has taught courses in new media, digital information fluencey, theatre, and performance at Marymount Manhattan College, the CUNY Online Baccalaureate, and The Cooper Union, and has taught Core II of the Graduate Center's Interactive Technology and Pedagogy program on numerous occasions.  He is currently working on developing his dissertation on intellectual property rights in theatrical production into a book, and has recently had articles published in the collections: Theater und Medien: Theatre and the Media and Studying the Event Film: The Lord of the Rings (co-authored with Henry Bial and Ryan Reynolds).


Michael Mandiberg
Associate Professor of Media Culture
The Graduate Center & College of Staten Island
Email: michael@mandiberg.com

Michael Mandiberg is an interdisciplinary artist, designer and scholar whose work employs each of these methodologies, in part to investigate the significance of their overlap. He creates conceptual art projects, design objects, and publications that explore collaboration, appropriation, environmentalism, and pedagogy. He sold all of his possessions online on Shop Mandiberg, made perfect copies of copies on AfterSherrieLevine.com, and created web browser plugins that highlight the environmental costs of a global economy on TheRealCosts.com. He is the co-author of Digital Foundations and Collaborative Futures, and editor of The Social Media Reader. A recipient of fellowships and commissions from Eyebeam, Rhizome.org, and Turbulence.org, his work has been exhibited at the New Museum, Ars Electronica, ZKM, and Transmediale. He lives, works, and rides his bicycle in Brooklyn. His work lives at Mandiberg.com.


George Otte
Ph.D. Program in English
The Graduate Center & Baruch
Email: george.otte@mail.cuny.edu

A member of the doctoral faculty at the CUNY Graduate Center (in the PhD Programs in English, Urban
Education and Interactive Technology & Pedagogy), George Otte became the founding Academic Director of the CUNY Online Baccalaureate, CUNY's first fully online degree, in 2006. He is now the chief academic officer of the CUNY School of Professional Studies, where that Online BA has been joined by an Online BS in Business. And he was recently named University Director of Academic Technology for CUNY, a modulation in the title of CUNY Director of Instructional Technology, a position he has held since 2001.


Anthony Picciano
Ph.D. Program in Urban Education
The Graduate Center & Hunter
Email: anthony.picciano@hunter.cuny.edu

Anthony G. Picciano is a professor and executive officer in the Ph.D. Program in Urban Education at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is also a member of the faculty in the graduate program in Education Leadership at Hunter College, the doctoral certificate program in Interactive Pedagogy and Technology at the City University of New York Graduate Center, and CUNY Online BA Program in Communication and Culture. He has thirty-nine years of experience in education administration and teaching, and has been involved in a number of major grants from the U.S. Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, IBM, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. In 1998, Dr. Picciano co-founded CUNY Online, a multi-million dollar initiative funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation that provides support services to faculty using the Internet for course development. He was a ounding member and continues to serve on the Board of Directors of the Sloan Consortium.

Dr. Picciano’s major research interests are school leadership, education policy, Internet-based teaching and learning, and multimedia instructional models. Dr. Picciano has conducted two national studies with Jeff Seaman on the extent and nature of online and blended learning in American K-12 school districts. He has authored numerous articles and eight books including Data-Driven Decision Making for Effective School Leadership (2006, Pearson), Educational Leadership and Planning for Technology, 4th Edition (2005, Pearson), Distance Learning: Making Connections across Virtual Space and Time (2001, Pearson), and Educational Research Primer (2004, Continuum). In 2007, he co-edited a book on blended learning with Chuck Dziuban entitled, Blended Learning: Research Perspectives (The Sloan Consortium). It is the only book in the field that provides a look at the research on blended learning. Most recently (2009), Dr. Picciano edited a special edition of the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks on the theme “Blending with Purpose”.


Christopher Stein
Associate Professor in the Media Arts & Technology
The Graduate Center & BMCC
Email: prof.stein@gmail.com

Christopher Stein is an Associate Professor in the Media Arts & Technology department at BMCC. There he teaches a range of courses including web design and multimedia programming. He is also a faculty member at the CUNY Graduate Center where he teaches in the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate program. His service to the University includes the CUNY Committee on Academic Technology and as the Director of User Experience for the CUNY Academic Commons. Teaching with technology is a long standing interest of his including related grants from the National Science Foundation and CUNY and presentations at the Sloan Symposium for Emerging Technologies for Online Learning, O’Reilly Tools of Change for Publishing and the CUNY IT Conference.


Joe Ugoretz
Technology and Learning at Macaulay Honors College
Email: joseph.ugoretz@mhc.cuny.edu

Joseph Ugoretz is Director of Technology and Learning at Macaulay Honors College and is a member of the Consortial Faculty for the CUNY Online Baccalaureate.  As a professor of English, Dr. Ugoretz has over a decade of experience incorporating educational technology into his literature and composition classes and mentoring fellow faculty members across disciplines.Some of his collaborative work from the Visible Knowledge Project is documented in the online gallery "Looking at Learning, Looking Together." Aside from educational technology, Dr. Ugoretz¹ research interests include Urban Legends and Internet Lore, Science Fiction, and Oral Performance Art (the subject of his fieldwork with pitchmen at county fairs and carnivals, and of his essay, "Quacks, Yokels, and Light-Fingered Folk: Oral Performance Art at the Fair."


Luke Waltzer
Center for Teaching and Learning at Baruch College
The Graduate Center & Baruch College
Email: Lucas.Waltzer@baruch.cuny.edu

Luke Waltzer is the Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at Baruch College, where he oversees a variety of educational technology and hybrid learning initiatives. He has a Ph.D. in History from the CUNY Graduate Center, serves as a Community Advisor to the CUNY Academic Commons and on the editorial collective of the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, and has contributed essays to Matthew K. Gold's Debates in the Digital Humanities and, with Thomas Harbison, to Jack Dougherty and Kristen Nawrotzki's Writing History in the Digital Age.  


Adrianne Wortzel

Entertainment Technology
The Graduate Center & City Tech

The Graduate Center & City Tech
Email: awortzel@citytech.cuny.edu

Website

Adrianne Wortzel's art explores historical and cultural perspectives in both physical and virtual networked environments as venues for interactive robotic and telerobotic installations, performance productions and texts. She is a Professor of Entertainment Technology at New York City College of Technology, CUNY, a member of the Graduate Center doctoral faculty of the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate Program, and an Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science. At Citytech she is the Founding Director of StudioBlue, a faculty research lab for video, telerobotics, sustainable invention and physical computing. Her work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the New York State Council on the Arts, the Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art, the Greenwall Foundation and the PSC-CUNY Research Foundation. Residencies include Eyebeam Art and Technology Center (2008), and the Swiss Artists-in-Labs Residency Award at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, University of Zurich (2004).


Sonia K. González
Assistant Program Officer
ITP Certificate Program, The Graduate Center
Email: sgonzalez1@gc.cuny.edu
Website

Committed to reproductive justice, fail forward with the tech stuff, public health doctoral candidate.

Drawing from training at CUNY School of Public Health, Mailman School of Public Health and over 15 years of HIV prevention experience working with vulnerable young people in Austin and New York, Sonia has developed a strong interest in community and reproductive health.  She has developed a sexual health education app, and is piloting it for her dissertation.