Show The Graduate Center Menu
 
 

Courses

FALL 2014

 

ASCP. 81000 - Introduction to American Studies  GC:  R, 6:30-8:30 p.m.,Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Burke, [25772] Cross listed with MALS 73100.  

This course examines the intellectual and institutional histories of scholarship in American Studies, and the American Studies movement, from the middle decades of the twentieth century to the present. We will read and discuss classic and contemporary texts, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary works in cultural history, literary studies, and the social sciences. In particular, we will consider such models and metaphors as “culture,” “civilization,” “mind,” “myth,” and “national character,” and how they have been employed by academics and social critics.

The course is required for students in the American Studies Certificate Program, and also welcomes Americanists from the Ph.D. Programs in English, History, Art History, Music, Theater, Urban Education, and the M.A. Program in Liberal Studies.

 ASCP. 89000 - Dissertation Workshop    GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Faherty, [25103] Course open to Level 2 and Level 3 students only.  

This workshop will give students the opportunity to develop and complete their dissertation prospectus and/or produce dissertation chapters.  It will primarily be conducted as a workshop with students reading and commenting on one another’s work, but will also include visits from faculty from across the disciplines who will offer brief presentations about their own scholarly praxis. We will discuss writing and revision, research, documentation,etc. We will also pay special attention to the challenges of writing about previously neglected archival materials.  We will also work on how to create a scholarly article or articles as part of the dissertation writing process, think about the differences between a chapter and an article, and look ahead to how the dissertation might become a first monograph. 
 

*Please note that we are experimenting this semester with doing away with the workload associated with officially cross-listing courses since the majority of our students have tended to register for courses through their home departments.

Instead we have constructed the lists below to underscore which courses will fulfill which requirements. We welcome your suggestions about this shift in policy.*

 

The following courses are equivalent to ASCP 81500 - Themes in American Culture
(Course descriptions available on the individual programs’ websites)
 

ANTH. 71300 - Feminist Ethnographies  GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Davis, [25131]   
ANTH. 72400 - Anthropology of Law    GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bornstein, [25136]

ANTH. 72900 - Ethnol/nog of the US  GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Susser, [25137] Course open to Ph.D. students in the Anthropology only. Course fulfills area requirement for cultural anthropology students.        
 
ART. 76040 - The Ready Made  GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Joselit, [25104] Course open to Ph.D. Art History students only. Permission required for all others
ART. 79400 - Aesthetics of Film  GC:  M, 4:15-7:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Singer, [25090] Course open to Art History Ph.D. students only. Cross listed with FSCP 81000 & MALS 77100.
ART. 89600 - Perf Blackness Stage-Screen  GC:   T, 2:00-6:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gates, [25099] This section open to Art History Ph.D. students only. Cross listed with FSCP 81000. 
 
EES. 79903 - Housing & Community Envirnmnt    GC:  W, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Saegert, [25482] This section open to EES students only. Cross listed with PSYC 80103.
EES. 79903 - Immigration/State/Justice  GC:  R, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Varsanyi, [25467] Cross listed with CRJ 87300.      
EES. 79903 - Migration and Ethnicity   H:   Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Miyares, [25489] Course open to EES Students only        
 
ENGL. 79010 - Discourses Domination/Resistan  GC:  W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 2/4 credits, Prof. Shor, [25044]   
ENGL. 80600 - On Ways of Being & Knowing GC:  M, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 2/4 credits, Prof. Chuh, [25032] Cross listed with WSCP 81000.       
ENGL. 85500 - Theorizng the African Diaspora   GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 2/4 credits, Prof. Reid-Pharr, [25040] Cross listed with WSCP 81000.       
ENGL. 89000 - Queer Lines of Communication   GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 2/4 credits, Prof. McBeth, [25445] 
 
FSCP. 81000 - Aesthetics of Film     GC:  M, 4:15-7:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Singer, [25078] Cross listed with ART 79400, MALS 77100 & THEA 71400.
FSCP. 81000 - Perform Blackness/Stage-Screen   GC:  T, 2:00-6:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gates, [25080] Cross listed with ART 89600, AFCP 80000 & THEA 81500.
 
HIST. 75200 - The Age of Revolutions   GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Oakes, [25180]    
HIST. 76910 - Mvmnt/Pwr/Diff Early Latin Am   GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bennett, [25728]  
HIST. 80010 - Literature of American Hist I   GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 5 credits, Prof. Waldstreicher, [25178] Course open to Ph.D. students in History only.
HIST. 84900 - Seminar in American History I  GC:  M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 5 credits, Prof. Kessner, [25179] Course open to Ph.D. students in History only. 
 
MUS. 84600 - Musical Modernism  GC:  T, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Straus, [25174] 
 
PHIL. 77700 - Feminist Theory GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Alcoff, [25303] Cross listed with WSCP 81001.   
PHIL. 77800 - Cosmopolitanism/Sovereignty   GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Dahbour, [25292]  
 
P SC. 72000 - American Politics   GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Lipsitz, [25618]  
P SC. 72001 - New Media and Politics  GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Arbour, [25626]   
P SC. 72100 - American Political Thought  GC:  M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Fontana, [25611]  
P SC. 72500 - Social Welfare Policy   GC:   W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gornick, [25620] Cross listed with SOC 85902 & WSCP 81000.
P SC. 76400 - Security Studies GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Liberman, [25627] 
 
SOC. 72500 - Race and Ethnicity   GC:  W, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kasinitz, [25340]
SOC. 73200 - Sociology of Gender  GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Eisenstein, [25367] Cross listed with WSCP 81000.
SOC. 75800 - Soc of Stratificatn/Inequality  GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Attewell/Battle, [25348]   
SOC. 80000 - Bodies, Media, Sociality  GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Clough, [25327] Cross listed wth WSCP 81000.    
SOC. 80000 - Sociology of Culture  GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Epstein, [25324]  
SOC. 84600 - Social Movements   GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Jasper, [25360]   
 
THEA. 71400 - Aesthetics of the Film  GC:  M, 4:15-7:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Singer, [25107] Cross listed with FSCP 81000, ART 79400 & MALS 77100. 
THEA. 81500 - Perform Blackness Stage/Screen  GC:  T, 2:00-6:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gates, [25112] Cross listed with FSCP 81000 & ART 89600.
 
U ED. 70400 - Pedagogy and Urban Classroom  GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Spring, [25418] Course open to Urban Education students only.       
U ED. 71100 - Immigrant Children & Families  GC:  M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Korn-Bursztyn, [25420]      
U ED. 71200 - Intro to Urban Literacies  GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Epstein, [25421]  
U ED. 75100 - Crit Childhd & Youth Studies    GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Luttrell, [25428] Course open to Urban Education & MALS students only. Cross listed with EES 79903, MALS 78500 & PSYC 80103.   
 
 

The following courses are equivalent to ASCP 82000 - American Culture: Major Periods
(Course descriptions available on the individual programs’ websites)

 

ANTH. 71800 - Communities & Environ Change  GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Checker, [25133] Cross listed with EES 79903 & PSYC 80103. This section open to Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 81200 - Internatnlism/Cosmopol/Justice  GC:  R, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wilder, [25146]       
 
 
ART. 79500 - History of Cinema II GC:  R, 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Dolan, [25091] Course open to Art History Ph.D. students only Cross listed with FSCP 81000, MALS 773 & THEA 71600. 
ART. 86010 - Represtns of Race 19th Cen Art   GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Sund, [25094] Course open to Art History Ph.D. students only. Permission required for all others   
ART. 86030 - Roots Modern Arch 1890-1920  GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Maciuika, [25095] Course open to Art History Ph.D. students only. Permission required for all others
ART. 87300 - Mex/Cal 1820-1920 Exhibtn Prep  GC:  T, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Manthorne, [25098] Course open to Art History Ph.D. students only. Permission required for all others 
     
EES. 79903 - Communities/Envirnmntl Change       
GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Checker, [25485] This section open to EES students only. Cross listed with ANTH 71800 & PSYC 80103.        
EES. 79903 - Crit Chldhood/Youth Studies
GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Luttrell/Hart, [25484] This section open to EES students only. Cross listed with MALS 78500, PSYC 80103 & U ED 75100.
EES. 79903 - Global Hazard/Env Res    
C:   T/R, 9:00-10:15 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, [25470] Course open to EES Students only    
 
ENGL. 80200 - Amer Aesth: Pragmtsm as Exper   GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 2/4 credits, Prof. Richardson, [25041]       
ENGL. 86600 - Postcol Globlty:On Speed Place  GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 2/4 credits, Prof. Hitchcock, [25036] Cross listed with WSCP 81000.        
FSCP. 81000 - History of Film II  GC:  R, 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Dolan, [25079] Cross listed with ART 79500, MALS 77300 & THEA 71600.    
 
HIST. 75700 - Aftermaths:WW-Postwar-Cold War  GC:  T, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Nasaw, [25181]   
HIST. 75900 - Race/Punishmt/Citizen US Hist  GC:  W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Muhammad, [25182] 
 
MUS. 86600 - 1920s:Mus/Culture in New York  GC:  F, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Taylor, [25175]     
 
PHIL. 76700 - Pragmatism  GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Godfrey-Smith, [25287]      
PHIL. 77600 - Justice, Memory, Forgiveness   GC:  M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Blustein, [25290] 
 
P SC. 80301 - Critical Reason: The Basics  GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Buck-Morss, [25613]
P SC. 80303 - Political Theory of Capitalism GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Robin, [25621]    
P SC. 80304 - Modern Political Thought  GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Mehta, [25619]    
P SC. 82001 - Modern Presidency: FDR - Obama GC:  W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Renshon, [25623] Cross listed with IDS 81660.   
P SC. 86401 - Humanitarian Politics  GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Weiss, [25614]    
P SC. 87800 - The Dark Side of Democracy  GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Markovitz, [25609]
 
SOC. 80101 - Origins of Capitalism  GC:  M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Post, [25365]     
SOC. 84001 - Race/Social Class in US Hist   GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Aronowitz, [25344]
SOC. 84600 - Citizenship & Human Rights GC:  T, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Turner, [25357] Cross listed with MES 79500.        
SOC. 84600 - Income Inequality/Natl-Global  GC:  W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Milanovic, [25354] Cross listed with IDS 81650
SOC. 85000 - Soc of Crime and Deviance  GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Brotherton, [25370]
SOC. 85600 - Rethinking Neoliberalism  GC:  T, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Fernandes, [25362]    
SOC. 85902 - Social Welfare Policy  GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gornick, [25366] Cross listed with P SC 72500 & WSCP 81000.
 
THEA. 71600 - Hist of Cinema II: 1930-1980  GC:  T, 2:00-6:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Dolan, [25400] Cross listed with FSCP 81000, ART 79500 & MALS 77300.  
THEA. 80300 - Theatre Hist as Microhistory   GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Hughes, [25108]   
 
SPAN. 87100 - Sp Topics Spanish-American Lit  GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Riobo, [25248]    
 
U ED. 75100 - Ed Polcy/Prac in Urb Context  GC:  W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Sonu, [25425]     
U ED. 75100 - Educating Educators  GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Michelli, [25429] 
U ED. 75100 - Integral Urban Education  GC:  M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Forbes, [25426]   
U ED. 75100 - New Media Literacy   GC:  W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Zuss, [25424]     
U ED. 75100 - Res Emotions in Tchng/Learng  GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Alexakos, [25430] 
 
 

#################################################################

SPRING 2014


ASCP. 81000 - Introduction to American Studies: Histories & Methods GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6494, 3 credits, Prof. Faherty, [23041] Cross listed with MALS 73200. 

Russ Castronovo and Susan Gillman begin the introduction to their recent collection States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies (2009), with a deceptively straightforward question: “What is the object of American studies?” They continue by unpacking the ramifications of that question, in particular by noting its imbrication in two corollary questions: “What does ‘American studies’ study, and what does it want?” The object of this course is to explore these questions by considering the histories, theories, genealogies, and practices of American studies from its inception as an academic discipline to the present. In other words, we will consider how in the span of about sixty years – using the first publication of American Quarterly in 1949 as a marker of discernable communal birth – American studies transformed from a movement into an institution (an institution marked by one of the largest annual academic conferences in the United States). As we undertake these questions, we will also consider if “American” Studies remains a viable field of study. Or to put it another way, is such a designation over-privileging the idea of the nation? Is such a focus being replaced by such concepts as “the Circum-Atlantic” or “Cosmopolitanism” or “Globalization”? What are the gains and losses of such movements? The collection edited by Castronovo and Gillman is just the latest iteration of an attempt to recalibrate the field of American studies, a struggle that is almost as old as the field itself. For all of its centrality, American studies remains an anomaly in the academy - as a program and not a department it resides somewhere between (or, perhaps, outside) normative disciplinary boundaries. Across the length of the semester we will consider the complexity inherent in this hybridity, as we trace the influence of both seminal and emerging work in American studies. We will also consider the different meanings that American studies has (and has had) for different disciplines, and attempt to take stock of its current position in the academy and in our own work.

 ASCP 81500 -- Africana Studies: Global Perspectives -- The Digital Caribbean  W, 4:15-6:15 pm, Prof. Josephs, 3 credits.[23942] Cross listed with MALS 73500

In its rhizomatic structure and development, the internet is analogous to Caribbean culture: born out of disparate pieces and peoples; always already predicated on an elsewhere as home or authority; always already working to ignore geography and physical space as barriers to connection. This seminar probes the various epistemological, political and strategic ways in which cyberspace intersects with the formation and conceptualization of the Caribbean.

What constitutes the Caribbean is, of course, not a new question. As we explore the digital media productions that continue to reconfigure the social and geographic contours of the region, we will build on familiar debates surrounding study of the Caribbean. Issues to be addressed include: Geography: What challenge, if any, might cyberspace pose to our geo-centered conceptualization of Caribbean cultures? Community: In what ways do online spaces that claim (or are claimed by) the Caribbean struggle, together or individually, to articulate a cohesive culture? Archival history and voice: Does the ephemerality of online life and the economics of access endanger or enable what we may call the Caribbean subject?  Identity and representation:  What indeed comprises “the Caribbean subject”? How do questions of authenticity get deployed in crucial moments of tension involving diasporic subjects, particularly in the sped-up world of digital production? These questions, framed by Caribbean Studies, will be our primary focus, but they will be articulated with questions and theories from new digital media studies about knowledge production and circulation, digital boundaries and the democracy of access and usage.

In addition to examining primary digital sources, we will read articles from writers including: Stuart Hall, Kamau Brathwaite, Edouard Glissant, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, David Scott, Annie Paul, Curwen Best, Lisa Paravisini-Gebert, Anna Everett, Karim H. Karim, Lisa Makamura, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Jennifer Brinkerhoff and others. Requirements: Oral presentations, blog and in-class participation, and a term paper (15-20 pages).


 ASCP. 81500 - American Political Thought  GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3    credits, Prof. O'Brien, [23753] Cross listed with P SC 82001 & WSCP 81000.   
 
 ASCP. 81500 - Comics and Graphic Novels GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3  credits, Prof. Gray, [23744] Cross listed with ENGL 87400.  

Academic interest in comic books and graphic novels has grown exponentially over the past twenty years, although scholars like Marshall McLuhan, Roland Barthes and Umberto Eco scrutinized comics as early as 1962. Comic scholarship flourishes now in part because it engages issues of textuality, iconcity, intersectionality and seriality that interest scholars in a variety of disciplines across the humanities. This course seeks to connect the diversity within the medium of comics—comic strips, reprint albums, comic books, underground comix, graphic novels, graphic autobiography, graphic narrative—to the varied scholarly approaches to the field by pairing a graphic novel with a critical work that comments on a theoretical issue raised in the primary text. This approach reflects inherently interdisciplinary nature of comic scholarship and also the reality that—with the rather notable exception of Hillary Chute at U. Chicago—the leading scholars within the American academy work on comics alongside more established fields of study such as children’s literature (Charles Hatfield), media studies (Henry Jenkins, Corey Creekmur), American studies (Derek Parker Royal), African American Studies (Marc Singer, Qiana Whitted) or even Renaissance studies (Benjamin Saunders).

A note on texts: Over the past twenty years, a handful of texts have achieved something akin to canonical status (if there was, in fact, still a canon) within Comics Studies. These are Art Spiegelman’s MAUS, Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen, and Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home. Based on my admittedly unscientific review, these four texts are the topic of nearly half the extant scholarly articles in the field. While I will include work from these authors in the course, I will assume that students are familiar with these foundational touchstones.

Requirements for this course include an annotated bibliography, an oral report, and a seminar length paper.   
 
 ASCP. 81500 - Constitutional Law GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Halper, [23750] Cross listed with P SC 72300.   

Constitutional Law begins by exploring several topics that will recur throughout the course: the tension between natural law and positive law; controversies about how to construe laws; the meaning and power of constitutions; and the proper role of courts in a democracy. If we cannot effectively hold them accountable, why do we want them to be powerful? If they lack the power of the purse and the sword, how can they be powerful? The course then turns to the chief substantive issues, separation of powers and federalism. Under the separation of powers, it deals with Dahl's analysis of the Supreme Court as a national decision maker, and examines cases involving Congress and the President, including INS v. Chadha, Ex parte Milligan, Hammer v. Dagenhart, Schecter Poultry v. U.S., Carter v. Carter Coal, Korematsu v. U.S., Youngstown Sheet & Tube v. Sawyer, U.S. v. Nixon, Clinton v. Jones, and Gore v. Bush. Among the issues raised are the uses to which the commerce clause can be put, the power of the national government during emergencies, addressing alleged presidential abuse, and deciding a problematical presidential election. Under federalism, the course will examine such cases as McCulloch v. Maryland, Plessy v. Ferguson, Lochner v. New York, Brown v. Board of Education, Moose Lodge v. Irvis, Milliken v. Bradley, Regents, University of California, Davis v. Baake, and Lopez v. U.S. Among the issues raised are liberty of contract, the takings clause, segregation and its removal, affirmative action, and state action. The course, in short, inquires as to how courts, constrained and empowered by unique rules and traditions, confront many of the great issues of the day. Although most of the assignments will be judicial opinions, readings  Syllabus - See more at: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Page-Elements/Academics-Research-Centers-Initiatives/Doctoral-Programs/Political-Science/Courses#halper 
 
 ASCP. 81500 - Dis/Abilities Across Contexts  GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Connor, [23759] Cross listed with U ED 75200. Course open to Urban Education students only.

Throughout history, people deemed “disabled” have been portrayed from a deficit-based perspective as being lacking, incomplete, less than fully human. At worst, disabled humans were banished, hidden, segregated, even killed; at best, they were expected to be cured, fixed, remediated, or restored to an approximation of culturally determined “normalcy.” Educational practices have mirrored these cultural mores. Traditional special education research has been predominantly founded upon scientific, medicalized, psychological, understandings of human difference—all contributing to the pathologization of human differences. However, a critical turn in educational theory has emerged to question what constitutes difference as dis/ability and subsequent implications for research, practice, and policy. This course will utilize critical writings about dis/ability from an interdisciplinary perspective, primarily culling from Disability Studies and Critical Race Theory to explore counter-stories to Master Narratives of dis/ability found in all aspects of society, including educational research and schools. Participants will study both research and “life writings” of/by people with disabilities in context using an intersectional lens composed of—race, social class, and gender—to explore alternative epistemologies, ontologies, and methodologies to those found in traditional special education research. Through this exploration of dis/ability in context, we will analyze long-standing educational problems such as: overrepresentation of children of color in special education; resistance to inclusive education; standardization; the achievement gap; the school to prison pipeline; and the “color-blind” stance of decontextualized educational research—with view to developing new ways to understand—and research—these pervasive problems.

 ASCP. 81500 - Discourses of HIV/AIDS  GC:  T, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kruger, [23745] Cross listed with ENGL 88200 & WSCP 81000. 

This course will look intensively at the writing that emerged during the first decade (or so) of the AIDS crisis in the United States. From its identification in 1981 as a new disease phenomenon, AIDS was associated – both in the popular imagination and in “official” scientific/medical and political discourses – with gay men and specifically anal sex, with the illegal use of intravenous drugs, and with particular ethnically/racially marked communities (Haitians, Africans). The challenge of describing, defining, responding to, and grappling with this new phenomenon, then, was – from the outset – intertwined with pre-existing discourses of gender, sexuality, and race, as well as with already established medical understandings (of immunity, infection and contagion, virality, mutation, and so forth).

For the first several weeks of the course, we will read a wide range of “documentary” materials – journalism, educational pamphlets, scientific/medical writing, political/activist texts – produced in response to HIV/AIDS, with a particular attention to how these reproduce and revise such pre-existing discourses and understanding. We will then turn to consider how literary/cultural works mobilize, develop, and call into question these broader discourses. Even just for the period 1981-1992, there’s a large literature in which AIDS and people with AIDS stand at the center, but the works on the syllabus will try to represent important movements within that literature: (1) dramatic representations that focus in complicated ways on individuals, relationships, and communities (e.g., Larry Kramer’s The Normal Heart, William Hoffman’s As Is, Cheryl L. West’s Before It Hits Home, Wayne Corbitt’s Crying Holy, Paula Vogel’s The Baltimore Waltz, Tony Kushner’s Angels in America), (2) performance art (e.g., Diamanda Galas, David Wojnarowicz, Pomo Afro Homos, Tim Miller), (3) poetry (e.g., Melvin Dixon, Adrienne Rich, Assotto Saint, Essex Hemphill, Paul Monette, Marilyn Hacker, Dennis Cooper, David Trinidad, Gil Cuadros), (4) novels as diverse as Paul Reed’s Facing It and Samuel R. Delany’s Flight from Nevèrÿon (two of the first novels to respond to AIDS; other fiction that might be included: John Weir’s The Irreversible Decline of Eddie Socket, Sarah Schulman’s People in Trouble, Rebecca Brown’s The Body and Its Dangers, Alice Hoffman’s At Risk, Geoff Mains’s Gentle Warriors, Larry Duplechan’s Tangled Up in Blue, Tim Barrus’s Genocide: The Anthology), (5) memoir (Monette, Wojnarowicz, Fran Peavey), (6) zines (particularly Diseased Pariah News). In addition, we’ll read some of the powerful critical and theoretical work (by writers like Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, Cindy Patton, Simon Watney, Douglas Crimp, Ross Chambers, Paula Treichler, and Leo Bersani) that emerges in the midst of the early years of the AIDS crisis and that itself analyses and tries to (re)shape the discourses of HIV/AIDS.

Requirements: oral presentations and seminar paper (15-20 pp.).
 
ASCP. 81500 - Feminist Political Theory GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Cole, [23752] Cross listed with P SC 80301 & WCP 81000.

Feminist political theory attempts to reimagine political life by scrutinizing our understanding of sex, sexuality, and gender. In doing so, it provides new perspectives on the meanings and limitations of central political concepts such as rights, equality, identity, and agency, as well as the scope and content of politics itself. At the same time, feminism continually confronts questions regarding its own boundaries, agendas, and even its subjects, e.g., what is a woman? How does the category of gender illuminate or eclipse power relations involving other categories of difference, such as those of culture, race, class, and sexuality? This course introduces students to central questions, approaches, and quandaries in contemporary feminist political thought. We begin by investigating how traditional political theory has viewed women, and how feminists have theorized the political. We then turn to think more comprehensively about what “sex” and “gender” are, and how they might be relevant to politics and to theorizing. Next, we read a range of texts addressing the intersection of gender with other forms of subjection, exploitation and discrimination. The course ends by surveying current political and cultural trends (from potty parity and “50 Shades,” to slut walks and “Gagafeminism”). Students will be expected to write short weekly reflections on the readings, make one or more class presentations, and write a final paper. Texts will include work by Sara Ahmed, Linda Alcoff, Gloria Anzaldúa, Wendy Brown, Judith Butler, Cathy Cohen, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Simone deBeauvoir, Mary Dietz, J. Jack Halberstam, Luce Irigaray, Catherine MacKinnon, Chandra Mohanty, Carole Pateman, Adrienne Rich, Gayle Rubin, Gayatri Spivak, Iris Young, Linda Zerilli, among others
 
 ASCP. 81500 - Gender, Power and Money GC:  M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. McCarthy, [23746] Cross listed with HIST 72200 & WSCP 81000.  

This course will examine the historical and theoretical literature on gender, power, and money, with an emphasis on the period from 1800 to the 1930s. Historians have made invaluable contributions in rewriting history “from the bottom up” over the past half century, but in the process they have underplayed the role of elites, the exercise of power (rather than agency), and the contours and consequences of the national pursuit of wealth. Gender studies have further complicated these issues, by underscoring the differences between men’s and women’s allotted public roles.  This course builds, in part, on this work and the writings of earlier theorists who wrote on the social meaning of money and the exercise of power; Thorstein Veblen, in particular, underscored the ties between masculinity and the pursuit of wealth, raising a number of questions.  How has the nexus of money and masculinity developed and changed over time; how has it affected men at the lower end of the economic spectrum as well as those at the top; how has it colored professional and political considerations?  What happened when money passed into women’s hands, especially as they moved into the public sphere through their business, political, social and philanthropic pursuits?  How have the exercise of power, and the pursuit and uses of wealth historically differed between women and men?

Although the weekly readings are historical, the course will draw on an interdisciplinary theoretical literature that spans women’s, gender and masculinity studies,sociology, and 19th and early 20th century economics. The readings are also structured in such a way that the course can be taken as a women’s studies class. Students will read one book per week for class discussion, and write a proposal for a research project to examine some aspect of gender, power, and/or money in American history. The goals are to introduce students to new areas of inquiry, and to hone their analytical and proposal-writing skills.

 
 ASCP. 81500 – History of Public Art in US  GC:  W, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Senie, [23742] Cross listed with ART. 77300 Course open to PH.D Art History students only.  Permission required for all others.

 This survey will consider various paradigms of public art since the nation’s beginnings to the present. It will consider the trajectory from memorial statues to abstract structures, urban and landscape design solutions, social practice, and locative media. The overarching question of (how) are criteria for public art distinct from museum or gallery art will be discussed in terms of patronage, site, audience response and/or participation as well as definitions of the public sphere. There will be visits to public and private commissioning agencies to consider the dynamics of contemporary patronage practice.

Up to 5 auditors permitted. They will be required to do one assignment. Preliminary Readings: • Harriet F. Senie and Sally Webster, eds. Critical Issues in Public Art (Smithsonian, 1998) • Cameron Cartiere and Shelly Willis, eds. The Practice of Public Art (Routledge, 2008)

ASCP. 81500 - 2nd plus Gen & Am Imm Intgrtn  GC:  R, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [23754] Cross listed with SOC 82800.

This course examines the ways that immigrants, and especially the second and subsequent generations are integrating into American society.  In particular, it asks how they engage with several American institutions: schools,  the political and voting systems,  socioeconomic and cultural institutions, and others.   It will look at schools as institutions for inclusion/exclusion;  will consider what political institutions and processes are working towards or against political incorporation of immigrants and later generations;   will review how assimilation is taking sometimes unexpected turns in various new immigration destinations in the northeast and southwestern US; and examine how other institutions, such as families and their internal dynamics, affect integration and mobility.   The course will give special consideration to the place of undocumented immigrants in American society.   Where appropriate, comparisons to European cases will be made. 
 
ASCP. 81500 - Knwldg Bldng/Community Context GC:  Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Adams, [23760] Course open to Urban Education students only. Cross listed with U ED 75200.    

The course will examine methodologies and methods to study the nature of knowledge systems used to succeed in urban communities and their relationships to canonical representations. The implications for urban education will be explored in very broad senses that extend beyond formal curricula in schools and other institutions and will especially include media and other educational structures. From an epistemological standpoint knowledge will include lifelong practices associated with everyday life in the diverse communities of New York City. Readings and dialogues in the course will help students further examine their current theoretical framework using participant-centered/community-centered lens. The final project will help students to think about ways of being a publicly engaged scholar through the use of digital media to produce resources such as websites, wiki sites, podcasts, and graphic novels for the purposes of communicating with different target audiences/stakeholders based on the field work.

ASCP. 81500 - Lit Survey - American History GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kessner, [23748] Course open only to students in the Ph.D. Program in History Cross listed with HIST 80010.    

The objective of this course is for students to read and discuss important studies in post Civil War American history.  They will be considering the ways in which the critical elements of American history have been conceived, structured and narrated. Some of the readings are classics; others are important because they offer provocative theses about long established historical questions; yet others introduce new viewpoints and new questions for historical inquiry. The broad scope of readings provides an essential immersion in the literature of the field and promotes a textured perspective for subsequent colloquia and seminars. Students will also be considering diverse approaches and methods of historical analysis that will help them shape their own research projects.

Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Kessner-syllabus

 ASCP. 81500 - un-common beauty  GC: M, 4:15-7:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Chuh, [23743] Cross listed with ENGL 80200.

José Muñoz reminded us throughout his work that there is enormous beauty to be found in the uncommon, the queer, the wonderfully odd.  This class will follow his lead.  We will focus on the question of uncommon beauty, especially as it relates to and/or rubs against modern rationalisms.  How does beauty work as a means of producing (un)common sensibility?  In what ways may it be mobilized as an analytic of the material conditions of life?  (How) Can beauty help us understand what is "in common," "uncommon," and "anti-commons"?  What is pleasurable -- and painful -- about the beautiful?  We will begin the class by reading Muñoz's Disidentifications and Cruising Utopia as well as other shorter writings, and our work will unfold thereafter to include, among others, Fred Moten, Karen Shimakawa, Alexandra Vazquez, Lauren Berlant, Karen Tongson, Jack Halberstam, Jacques Ranciere, Walter Mignolo, Sianne Ngai, and Kara Keeling.  We may also read selections from earlier philosophical writings by figures like Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, and Adorno, and we will collectively identify primary texts -- literature, performance, visual art, and so on -- to become part of the course's work.  Students registering for four credits should expect to produce a short essay mid-term and a longer seminar paper or equivalent project by the semester's end.  Students taking the course for two credits should expect to produce a short essay appropriate for conference presentation or an equivalent project.  Everyone registering for the course will please read the two Muñoz books referred to above for the first meeting of the class.

ASCP. 81500 - Seminar in American History II GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Johnson, [23749] Course open only to students in the Ph.D. Program in History Cross listed with HIST 84900.   

This course completes the literature survey, addressing topics from Reconstruction through the 20th century. The course requires a book per week, plus multiple supplementary reading assignments .Open only to PhD Program in History students.

 ASCP. 81500 - Slavery, Politics & Difference GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bennett, [23747] Cross listed with HIST 72700 & AFCP 73100.   

            At its core, this course seeks to situate the study of African societies in the overlapping histories of the Atlantic and the African diaspora.  Accomplishing this task is no simple feat since African history, Atlantic studies, and the African diaspora emerged as subjects of scholarly inquiry burdened by the weight of European colonial expansion and the racialized nature of knowledge production.  The intent here is not simply to offer a relentless critique but to foster awareness of and need for historical specificity.
            By employing the heuristic concepts of Atlantic and diaspora, this course focuses on the analytical work generated by studying both the spatial re-configurations of African history and resulting emergence of successive movement cultures.  As scholars, we might begin by asking how do the concept of “Atlantic” and “diaspora” complicate our understanding of disciplinary formations—including the normative assumptions that inform the study of society and culture in the African past?  In what ways do “Atlantic” and “diaspora,” for instance, enhance our perspectives on imperial, colonial and subsequently national formations and the manner in which they have been historically represented?  In utilizing Atlantic and diaspora we confront the politics of representation through which scholars render meaning out of the past and present.  For this reason, Atlantic and diaspora, like other categories of analysis, engage the vexed terrain of representation whereby scholars frame the subject of their inquiries.  In our efforts to route the study of African history through both the Atlantic and African diaspora we also engage another scholarly abstraction—the early modern period—which will delineate the genealogies of a number of analytical concepts to be discussed in the course. 
            Atlantic Africa also seeks to refine our engagement with the standard categories of historical analysis framed around the political, economic, social and cultural.  In the wake of successive intellectual turns (the linguistic, feminist, cultural, the post-colonial, and archival turn), our engagement with the cultural domain has become finely honed but at the expense of our understanding of the social.  This dynamic, in many respects, reflects the working of related but distinct renderings of the political.  Arguably, for cultural historians narrating the political entails discursive formations and an awareness of how political rationalities are grafted on to cultural codes and grammars.  While we now understand how the political related to the social draws on similar discursive formations, it also embodies a materiality—signified in the relationship of the political to the economy as in ‘political economy’—that configures it as distinct.   To this end, the course will introduce students to a range of authors and texts which will develop our analytical skills as they relate to the realm of political economy.  To be clear, this is not a course in economics or political science for historians.  While abstractions of the “economy” or “politics” figure prominently in the semester’s work, the course focuses on the contextualized meanings that these terms and related concepts implied for various authors and historical actors through time and space.  At the same time, it should be understood that this course does not offer a formalized discussion of ‘political economy’ framed through a historiography self-consciously stylized as such.  Instead by bringing a distinct selection of authors and texts into conversation seminar participants will hopefully refine their acumen for thinking and writing about the temporal and spatial specificity of early modern political economy.
 

ASCP. 81500 - Soc Construction of Illness GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Katz Rothman, [23823] Cross listed with SOC 82800 & WSCP 81000. 

Illness writes the body: our sense of self, of health, of our physical being, takes meaning from the contrast with illness.  And the social world writes illness: what it is to be ill; what categories of illness are acknowledged; how illness is defined, treated, managed, and determined.  The study of illness places us at the intersection of agency and social control; body and society; the "natural" and the "technological"; the self and the social world. 

This course  is an introduction to some of the basic concepts of Medical Sociology, beginning with the theoretical perspective that grew out of Symbolic Interactionism and labeling theory to offer a sociological understanding of illness. In the years since, the process of medicalization (placing more and more arenas of life into a medical frame) has moved beyond being a program of professional domination, and become increasingly internalized as "patients" become self-diagnosing and self-medicating consumer/customers and as corporate dominance increases.   Starting with the specific management of birth and of death, we will move on to several case-studies of diseases including AIDS and SIDS.  With that base, we will more generally consider social epidemiology, the social causation of disease, or disease as written in race, sex, and class, including the historical uses of medicalization to label women as almost inherently pathologized; and moving to an understanding of illness as performance and as representation.

ASCP. 81500 - The Ghetto & the Enclave GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Alba/Duneier, [23755] Cross listed with SOC 82800.   

"The Ghetto and the Enclave."  The course will an historical and international survey of ghettoes and enclaves and address how they come about and what consequences they have for the lives of their residents.  It will cover the gamut of methods that are currently used to study these topics, from ethnography to geographic information systems. 

ASCP. 81500 - The Global South GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Lott, [23042] Cross listed with ENGL 80600.     

Continuing the fall semester’s emphasis on subjects adjacent to the black Atlantic, this course bridges new southern studies initiatives within American Studies and postcolonial studies of global South formations, from cotton belt to sun belt to the “color line [that] belts the world,” in W.E.B. Du Bois’s fine phrase.  We’ll consider these formations in three conceptual frames: a sub-national U.S. section with a distinctive, historically changing political and cultural economy (chattel slavery, debt peonage, New South industrialism, post-Fordist neoliberalism); a hemispheric formation extending across the Caribbean and Latin America to which these modes were exported (e.g. Fordlandia) even as labor, commodities, and cultures were extracted (e.g., reggae and the so-called Latin American Boom); and finally that relatively new (post-Cold War) imaginary that has come to be called the global South—low-wage losing player in today’s international division of labor, keynoted among others by that Bastard Out of Arkansas, Wal-Mart. This is all obviously a tall order, and we’ll be able only to sketch certain genealogies of cultural-political thought and struggle.  But among them we’ll take up the idea of southern exceptionalism, what used to be called the “mind” of the South, and its cultural expressions (the plantation romance, the rape-lynching nexus, Faulkner, Hurston, the blues, Deliverance, Lil Wayne); the U.S. South’s various and extensive cultural-political relations with its southern neighbors (the existence of Texas, the vogue of the banana, Jose Marti, Miami’s Little Haiti, post-Revolutionary Cuba’s bifurcated metropole, Faulkner’s influence on Garcia Marquez, the invention of the Caribbean steel drum out of the U.S. oil drum, Derek Walcott’s Arkansas Testament); and the place and role of the U.S. South in a global North-South divide (Richard Wright’s report on his trip to the 1955 Bandung conference of non-aligned nations, the post-1965 Pacific Rim remaking of states like Virginia, “Toyotization” in North Carolina auto plants, Wal-Mart as template for 21st-century capitalism—a tale of bar codes, containerization, pop-up factories, and sweated labor there and here).
 
 
ASCP. 81500 - The Rock Musical GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wollman, [23757] Cross listed with THEA 80200.  

The rock musical is a broad, loosely defined subgenre of the American musical that started in the US but has been absorbed into musical theatre traditions in many nations. Reflecting the influence of rock music’s stylistic and performance aesthetics, it developed on and Off Broadway beginning in the late 1960s, initially in response to the tastes of the baby-boom generation. While musical theatre composers routinely appropriated popular styles like ragtime and jazz for theatrical purposes shortly after their emergence, Broadway was relatively slow to absorb rock, which did not lend itself as easily to absorption due to comparatively radical sociological, ideological, aesthetic, and performance differences. This course is designed for graduate students who seek greater understanding of the relationship between the American musical theatre and contemporary popular song, as both have developed from the second half of the 20th century to the present, and as both have spread to become truly international forms of musical expression. Beginning with early rock musicals like Hair, Jesus Christ Superstar, and lesser-known works like Your Own Thing and The Last Sweet Days of Isaac, and culminating with more contemporary works like Rent, Next to Normal, and Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, sessions will be devoted to the examination of stage works that reflect interrelated developments in the contemporary pop and commercial theatre worlds, primarily in the US and England, but increasingly across Europe–specifically Germany, Austria, France, Poland, and Russia–in the past half-century. Readings and topics for discussion will emphasize socio-cultural developments, aesthetics, performance ideology, sexuality and gender, and the ever-growing impact of the mass media.

Requirements: Weekly reading assignments; class participation; one 20-25 page term paper to be written on a topic that has been approved by the instructor.

 ASCP. 81500 - Urban Politics GC:  M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Di Gaetano, [23751] Cross listed with P SC 72500.

This course is designed to introduce students the study of urban politics. The first part of the course critically examines the leading theoretical perspectives on urban politics: regime theory, political culture, and political economy. The second portion of the course traces the development of urban political institutions and practices from the early 19th century to the present. This part will assess not only urban political development in the United States, but also the ability of the three perspectives to explain this development. The final section of the course takes stock of the state of urban political theorizing and analysis, evaluating their strengths and weaknesses.
 

ASCP. 82000 - Arch/Urbanism in US since 1945 GC:  T, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gutman, [23763] Cross listed with ART 87500. Course open to Ph.D. Art History students only. Permission required for all others.   

This seminar will examine architecture and urbanism in the United States since 1945. Organized chronologically and thematically, it will introduce buildings, cities, landscapes, cultures, and theories that make architecture in this period in American history so compelling to study. Architects, planners, landscape architects, artists, designers, developers, and policy-makers will be given their due; so, too, will critics, activists, and others who questioned, contested, and resisted the use of the built environment to execute cultural and political authority. A recurring theme will be the relationship of architecture to the American democratic project, and the construction of space, in the physical, social, and discursive realms, will be emphasized as an analytic tool. Preliminary Readings: • Dell Upton, Architecture in the United States (Oxford).
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Black Femnm/Civil Rights Mvmnt GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wallace, [23766] Cross listed with ENGL 85500 & WSCP 81000.   

This course will look at crucial and some very recent scholarly black feminist perspectives on the long Civil Rights Movement, from the Brown vs. Bd. Of Education decision “de-segregating the schools and the murder of Emmett Till in 1955 through the early 70s-- the arrest of Angela Davis, the appointment of Aileen Hernandez as the first black president of the National Organization of Women (NOW), Shirley Chisolm’s bid for Presidency, the passage of the EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Act) and the founding of the National Black Feminist Organization.

At the same time, black women’s writing makes its significant appearance on the central stage of American culture with the publication of Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Cage Bird Sings, Alice Walker’s The Third Life of Grange Copeland and Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye. Our texts will be Johnetta Cole and Beverly Guy Sheftall’s Gender Talk: The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities, Paula Gidding’s When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America, Barbara Ransby’s Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Vision, Jeanne Theoharis’s The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks and Danielle McGuire’s At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance—A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power. We will rely upon Claybourne Carson’s helpful illustrated overview –Civil Rights Chronicle: The African American Struggle for Freedom (2003) and the documentary series Eyes on the Prize for overall context. My own Black Macho and the Myth of the Superwoman (1979) may be a starting point or touchstone for some. Yet what is really impressive is how far the scholarship has come since then. Requirements for the course are weekly entries in a written journal and/or online discussion board and a final term (10 pages) or research (20) pages—your choice.
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Caribbean in Atlantic World GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Skurski, [23761] Cross listed with ANTH 73300.  
 
 ASCP. 82000 – Colonial/Early Federal American Literature GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Reynolds, [23764] Cross listed with ENGL 75000.

American literature cannot be fully understood without a familiarity with its rich, varied early phase, which extends from the narratives of pre-1600 European explorers of the New World through seventeenth-century Puritan poetry and prose to the eighteenth-century literature of enlightenment, revolution, national founding, and early romanticism.  This course examines this formative period of American literature and culture.  Besides covering the full range of colonial and early federal writings, we probe various critical and theoretical approaches to American literature. In particular, transnational, circumatlantic, and cultural- studies approaches, which have been prominent in recent Americanist criticism, are drawn upon for insights into this literature, much of which is preoccupied with questions of transatlantic exchange, colonialism, and diaspora.   Among the topics considered are encounters between European settlers and ethnic others; ongoing efforts to define America and Americanness in transatlantic contexts;  the culture and aesthetics of New England Puritanism (crucial for understanding later writers such as Emerson, Hawthorne, and Melville); the innovative poetry of Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor; the seminal contributions to philosophy and homiletics by Jonathan Edwards; African Americans and slavery, including the earliest known examples of slave narratives; Native American writing, such as the Winnebago trickster cycle; the Indian captivity narrative; women’s writings, such as Judith Sargent Murrary’s feminist prose and Susanna Rowson’s popular novel Charlotte Temple; public and autobiographical writings by Jefferson, Franklin, Adams, Paine, and Hamilton; and the American Gothic fiction of Philadelphia’s Charles Brockden Brown.  Course requirements include a term paper and an oral report on a work of criticism.
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Conceptualizing Global Political Thought GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m.,  Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Mehta, [23774] Cross listed with P SC 71901.  

This course will consider some of the ways in which normative thought has conceptualized “the global” in different traditions of thinking and in different time periods. The course will contrast such forms of thought with those that were not global, and instead self consciously particularistic, i.e. norms that apply to particular people and particular places. The basic question that the course will explore is, on what basis do some ideas and practices acquire a global normative reach, while others clearly do not. We do not, for example, typically think of there being a global basis to norms of etiquette or modes of greeting. But we do increasingly thinks that certain matters, which are typically taken to be political and scientific - such as not torturing people or diagnosing and curing diseases - should have a normative basis that is global.

The readings will draw on religious, secular and scientific thinking from diverse traditions.

 ASCP. 82000 - Congress/Polarization GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Jones, [23776] Cross listed with P SC 72210. 

Has the American public become more polarized? What about political elites running in elections and serving in government? Is there any connection between mass and elite polarization? Why does polarization seem to be taking place, and what are its consequences? This class will delve deeply into all of these questions. We will begin by taking a historical perspective and asking whether current levels of polarization within the U.S. government are unusually high, or whether the seemingly low levels from a half century ago were the real aberration. We will explore several different explanations for why the parties in government have become more divided from each other over the past 50 years or so, including both constituency-based explanations as well as institutional ones. After that, we will shift our attention to the mass public. We’ll examine evidence both for and against the notion that the American public is currently polarized, and try to document and explain the specific ways in which the American public has—and has not—become more polarized over time (e.g., culturally, economically, geographically). Finally, we will analyze the consequences of elite and mass polarization—for public policy, for representation, and for public’s attitudes towards politics and government. Many of the readings in the class will be drawn from the American politics reading list – integrating both American institutions and processes.


 ASCP. 82000 - Consumer Society & Culture GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Zukin, [23779] Cross listed with SOC 86800.

Consumption is one of the three basic arenas of the modern public sphere.  It poses challenges not only to us in our everyday lives, but also to us as social researchers who study the critical practices of everyday life.  Following Weber, Veblen, Bourdieu, and Baudrillard, we will develop an institutional framework for understanding modern consumer society and the cultures that it spawns.  How does “consumer society” develop around the world?  What is the state’s interest in creating consumer-citizens?  How do ideologies and interests compete at each stage of the global commodity chain?  How does technology shape the life-cycle of commodities?
 
Drawing on social theories and empirical analyses, we will explore consumption in the global political economy through creative responses to weekly reading assignments and an individual research paper on a significant empirical question.  Issues to look for:  consumption and inequality, the global food economy, shopping as the default mechanism of social choice.
 
  ASCP. 82000 - Critical Approaches to Performance Studies  GC:  T, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wilbourne, [23773] Cross listed with MUS 86500.  
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Edith Wharton: Texts & Contexts  GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Hoeller, [23765] Cross listed with ENGL 85000 & WSCP 81000.   

Edith Wharton was a great American writer, a great woman writer, and a great New York writer. Her work is extraordinary versatile—spanning from short stories to fiction, from books on  interior decoration, gardening and architecture to unique female reporting and writing about World War I.  Her fiction responds to several major literary traditions: sentimental fiction, realism, naturalism, and modernism. Her writing tackles most of the cultural and social concerns of her time, including issues of gender, race, nation, and class. On all of these issues, she held complicated views. Unlike most American writers, she managed simultaneously to become canonized and sell her work successfully as a professional writer. Many Wharton papers are available in reasonable vicinity from us, such as in the Beinecke Library at Yale or the Firestone Library at Princeton University. This seminar will explore Edith Wharton’s wide-ranging work, from her juvenile novella to her last unfinished novel, from her letters to her fiction, from her writing on interior decorating to her World War I writings. It will encourage critical projects that link Wharton to a wide variety of contexts, materials, and critical approaches.
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Education Policy and Law GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bloomfield, [23780] Course open to Urban Education students only, Cross listed with UED 75200.  

  "Education Policy and the Law" focuses on the American education policy-making process at the federal, state, and district levels through legislation, regulation, contracts, and case law. Readings include Education Policy and the Law, 5th ed. by Mark G. Yudoff, et al.; my text, American Public Education Law, 2d ed., plus additional readings.  The course takes an activist approach, not only discussing how urban educators are affected by law-based education policies but how students can use these structures to advance their own policy goals.
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Expressionism to Neo-Noir GC:  T, 2:00-5:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Dickstein, [23767] Cross listed with FSCP 81000, THEA 81500, ART 89600 & MALS 77200. 

This course will explore the style, sensibility, and historical context of film noir. After tracing its origins in German expressionism, French “poetic realism,” American crime movies, the hard-boiled fiction of Dashiell Hammett and James M. Cain, and the cinematography and narrative structure of Citizen Kane, we will examine some of the key films noirs of the period between John Huston’s The Maltese Falcon of 1941 and Welles’s Touch of Evil in 1958.

These will include such works as Double Indemnity, Mildred Pierce, Out of the Past, Detour, Shadow of a Doubt, Pickup on South Street, In a Lonely Place, Gun Crazy, The Killers, DOA, Ace in the Hole, The Big Heat, and Kiss Me Deadly.
We’ll explore the visual style of film noir, the different studio approaches to noir, importance of the urban setting, the portrayal of women as lure, trophy, and betrayer, and the decisive social impact or World War II and the cold war. We’ll also examine the role played by French critics in defining and revaluing this style, and touch upon its influence on French directors like Melville (Bob le Flambeur, Second Breath), Truffaut (Shoot the Piano Player), and Chabrol (La Femme Infidele, Le Boucher).
Finally, we’ll look at the post-1970s noir revival in America in such films as Chinatown, Blade Runner, Body Heat, and Red Rock West.

Readings will include materials on the historical background of this style, key critical and theoretical texts on film noir by Paul Schrader, Carlos Clarens, James Naremore, Eddie Muller, Alain Silver and others, and the work of some hard-boiled fiction by writers such as Dashiell Hammett, James M. Cain, David Goodis, and Patricia Highsmith. 

Students will be expected to do an oral report and a 15-page term research paper, as well as to study the assigned films both in and out of class.
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Gender & Globalization GC:  T, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Eisenstein, [23756] Cross listed with SOC 86800 & WSCP 81000. 

In this course we will examine the relationship between the phenomenon now widely termed “globalization,” and the changes in gender relations that have taken place since the rise of the second wave of the women’s movement in the 1960s.

Since the end of the “long boom” (starting after World War II and lasting through the mid-1970s), academic and mainstream feminism have enjoyed enormous success, during a period of economic, social, and political restructuring that has created an intensified polarization between rich and poor, and an ever-growing mass of desperately impoverished people around the globe. This course will examine this paradox.

We will seek to define globalization, starting from the premise that this is a stage in the development of the international capitalist system, under the economic and military domination of the world’s only remaining superpower. More specifically, we will look at the “Washington consensus,” under which developing countries have been forced to open their borders to the free flow of capital from the rich countries. Among other changes, “globalization” involves the intensive use of female labor, from maquiladoras to electronics factories to textile factories.  It has also produced an acceleration of “informal” work for women. 
While educated women can now walk through many doors previously closed to them, in the worlds of business, sports, and politics, the majority of women in the world are increasingly impoverished, overworked and exploited, and subject to a wide variety of forms of violence, sexual, military, and economic.  The majority of the world’s refugees are now women and children.
We will address these issues by posing a number of questions. Where does the ideology of globalization come from? How has globalization affected the conditions of women and children in the developed and the developing world?  How has contemporary feminism been shaped by the workforce participation of women?  What is the role of class and race in the women’s movement, domestically and internationally? Why are issues of gender, sexuality, and race so central to the culture wars being waged at home and abroad by religious fundamentalist leaders?  How does the association of “liberated women” with modernity affect the process of globalization? In the revived social movement that has placed the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other international financial institutions at the center of an intensified campaign for social justice, what is the place for organized women’s activism?

Readings in the course are selected from theoretical writings as well as case studies, and students are encouraged to develop their own research and activist agendas.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 
  1. I assign entire books, but do not expect you to have read every page as you prepare for class. Therefore, throughout the semester, students will be asked to present chapters from the books we are reading.  These presentations are informal, and are designed to summarize material for the rest of the class.  Each presenter should speak for about 5-10 minutes; it is helpful if students also distribute an outline of the chapter to the class.
 
  1. Students are asked to write a short “zap” or response paper (1-2 pages, double-spaced) in response to each week’s reading and discussion.  The sequence is: (a) come to class prepared to discuss the reading; (b) after the class, write your zap as soon as possible, covering both your reactions to the reading and your response to the class discussion, particularly if the latter has affected your own interpretation of the material.  The zaps are due the following class meeting. These papers are free form, require no footnotes, and should reflect your honest reactions to the ideas we have been debating. 
 
  1. Each student will write a research paper on a topic related to the course.  This is a 25-page paper, so you will want to select your topic early in the semester, in consultation with me. Paper proposals with a list of proposed sources are due Tuesday, April 9.  You are encouraged to select a research area that is of use to you in completing your examinations or your dissertation work.  Ideally your written work for this class could be the basis of a thesis chapter.  If you are an activist, the paper can be a piece of writing useful to your organizing work. The paper can take the form of a literature review, a research paper, or an essay. Alternative final projects such as performance pieces or videos are also welcome. We will devote our final session to brief presentations of your research projects.
 
BOOKS         
The books for this course are on reserve at the Mina Rees Library and for sale at Book Culture, 536 West 112th Street, New York, NY 10025; (212) 865-1588.

 ASCP. 82000 - Public Higher Education in 21C  GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Botman, [23781] Cross listed with U ED 75200.  

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the characteristics, challenges, and promises of public higher education in the United States. The readings will cover a range of topics including:  student access, changing curricula, faculty roles, governance, and higher education costs and funding sources.  We will consider the rise and importance of community colleges and their popularity across the United States while observing  the diversity of higher education institutions across the country. We will review the roles trustees, community partners, and  state officials play, examining the relationship between institutions and the state.  Finally, we will assess the changes taking place across the higher education landscape.
 
Since there are calls for increasing accountability in higher education, we will examine new sources of information for the students, parents, and funding bodies and ask whether a more sophisticated consumer will change higher education institutions. If so, in which ways?
 
This course is designed for students who are interested in college teaching or administration. The class will be structured as a seminar where students will be expected to participate in class discussions (10% of the grade), lead designated conversations (10% of the grade), write a case study (30% of the grade) and turn in a research paper at the end of the course (50% of the grade). Assigned readings will include books, articles and web materials.
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Research Sem: Ethnomusicology GC:  W, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Sugarman, [23772] Cross listed wth MUS 83100.    
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Software/Clblztn/Poltcl Action  GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 2-4 credits, Profs. Manovich/Buck-Morss, [23777] Cross listed with ART 76040 & P SC 80301.   

This is an interdisciplinary seminar that will focus on three themes:

1) Vision and Image - From Walter Benjamin and Dziga Vertov to Instagram and machine vision: new strategies of seeing and representation in modern and software societies. Image v. Concept (Hegel against ‘picture thinking’) Image and historical matter (Benjamin on the “dialectical image”). Aesthetics and Politics: Images as a (trans- local) language for political action; vision and democracy: the “ethical turn.”  

2) Data and Knowledge - Knowledge production in the age of "big data." Images as sources of knowledge; computerization of thinking and culture. Interactive visualization as research method in humanities (including art history.) Political critique of methods (positivism, abstraction, categorical givens) and goals (surveillance, marketing, positivism). Surveillance: how it is down, and what to do about it? Knowledge of, by and for whom?  

3) Crowds and Networks - What are the new forms of sociality and political action enabled by global networks? Networked Images as political instruments. Crowds and the decentered brain. Crowds and/as a medium of global political action since the Arab Spring. The new body politic as a body without skin. 
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Sonic Cinema  GC:  R, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Herzog, [23768] Cross listed with FSCP 81000, THEA 81500, MUS 81505 & ART 89600. 

This elective course will approach key debates in the emerging field of sound and media studies.  Beginning with the declarations of the death of cinema that coincided with the first talkies, we will trace the tensions between sound and image that have remained central in critical writing about audiovisual media.  Course sessions will include work on film accompaniment in the “silent” era, film scoring, musical films, film soundtracks, music videos, and sound and music in experimental sound and video. A significant portion of the course will be devoted to developments in digital technology, and their impact on sonic landscapes in new media, from blockbuster films to video games and installation art. 

Throughout the semester, and across these diverse media, we will return to several central questions: how can sound serve to reinforce, or to disrupt, regimes of audiovisual representation?  Does attention to sound complicate theories of spectatorship and corporeality in cinema?  Toward what political ends do artists deploy sound, music, and noise?

Readings will include seminal texts on film music, musical genres, and film sound from authors such as Michel Chion, Claudia Gorbman, Rick Altman, Royal Brown, John Belton, Mary Ann Doane, and Elisabeth Weiss.  We will also draw on more recent work, including texts by Frances Dyson, Suzanne Cusick, Anahid Kassabian, Will Straw, Carol Vernallis, and Jonathen Sterne.  Audiovisual works will span a wide historical, geographical, and generic range, with screenings by René Clair, Vincent Minnelli, Alfred Hitchcock, Mary Ellen Bute, Soundies jukebox films, Jacques Demy, Chang Cheh, Jean-Luc Godard, Curtis Mayfield, David Lynch, Michael Haneke, Tsai Ming-liang, Marlon Riggs, Ryan Trecartin, Candice Breitz, Spike Jonze, Bjork, and Konami Games.  

Students will conduct a semester-long project, and will present elements of their research during a course session related to their topic.  In addition, they will post four short responses to readings on a course blog.  Throughout the semester, students will be encouraged to suggest supplemental readings and to help curate screening sessions, both in-class and online.
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Studying Urban Schools  GC:  R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Semel, [23782] Cross listed with U ED 75200.   

This course examines the history of different types of urban schools, including public, independent, Catholic and their different types of pedagogic practices, traditional and progressive. Through a number of school histories, students will analyze the ways in which urban schools have changed over time and how, despite significant social, political and educational change, there has been significant constancy. The course will examine a number of themes, including issues of race. social class, ethnicity and gender, differences in place (urban schools as different?), differences in types of schools (i.e. public vs. private), differences in curriculum and pedagogy (i.e. traditional and progressive), the role of particular schools in educational reform, constancy and change in urban schooling, and methods for writing school histories.
 
 ASCP. 82000 - The First Emancipation Campaign  GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Sassi, [23770] Cross listed with HIST 75000.    

This colloquium explores the history and historiography of Revolutionary America’s “first emancipation,” during which every one of the United States from Pennsylvania northward either abolished slavery outright or put it on a gradual track toward elimination.  We will pay particular attention to the political dynamics of the antislavery campaign, or why and how it succeeded -- or met with frustration -- where and when it did.  We will also attend to the social and ideological origins of abolitionism; the Atlantic-wide contexts of the first emancipation in the U.S.; and its many legacies for nineteenth-century American society, politics, and culture, including the contested construction of race.  Students will engage the readings through weekly discussions and short essays.  

 ASCP. 82000 - Visual Culture of 19C America   GC:  M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Brown, [23771] Cross listed with HIST 75400.    

"Historical understanding is like a vision, or rather like an evocation of images." Taking Johan Huizinga at his word, this course is about the use, abuse, lapses, and strengths of visual "documents" as subject, evidence, and method in studying the past. The class will explore the ways the study of visual culture illuminates and alters the research and analysis of major areas and themes in nineteenth-century U.S. social, political, and cultural history. We will investigate the manner in which different visual media documented, articulated, and embodied conditions, relations, ideas, identity, and issues from the early republic to the age of imperialism—with occasional forays to explore the comparative, transnational, and digital. While structured chronologically, the course readings and discussions are organized to consider a range of historiographic approaches and methods and to critically evaluate the impact and efficacy of using visual evidence.
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Writing Women's History GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Cook/Welter, [23769] Cross listed with HIST 74300 & WSCP 81000.    

This course explores writings about 19th and twentieth century U.S. women. Students choose from an extensive reading list of biography, autobiography, scholarly monographs and articles, and theory. They are free to concentrate on topical or chronological areas of particular interest to them. Guest lecturers will
discuss their work and experience, and the students are encouraged to consider global as well as U.S. contemporary and historical issues in women’s lives today.

Learning Objectives: The student should be able to analyze and criticize major examples of writing women’s lives; be familiar with the trajectories of women’s lives and the influences of such traditional “markers” of historical inquiry as religion, region, class, ethnicity and gender, which remained the same or changed over time; be able to identify important primary sources in the historical construction of a
woman’s life, as well as major secondary sources in the field; be aware of controversies and contested interpretations of United States history, in  terms of  women,  the  context, and their choices; and be able to understand and be able to document the role which American women played in economic, political,
intellectual, cultural and social movements in the United States, including but not limited to the usual “women’s issues.”

The recommended text for an overview is Women’s America: Refocusing the Past. Linda K. Kerber, Jane Sherron De Hart, Cornelia Hughes Dayton, eds. New York: Oxford University Press, Seventh Edition, 2011
 
 ASCP. 82000 - Yth Mrgnlztn/Subcltr Resistnce GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Brotherton, [23778] Cross listed with SOC 85000.

In the current period a plethora of youth resistance actions, movements and subcultures have developed in response to socio-economic dislocations on a global scale. From rebellious students, youth riots in England to graffiti writers in Rio de Janeiro to politicized gangs in Quito and New York and the globalized Occupied Wall Street movement an endless range of symbolic and substantive responses by youth to their felt conditions of marginality can be observed and studied. In this seminar we will excavate this dynamic and fluid social field through focusing on theories and empirical studies that help to explain the continuity and discontinuity of youth social and cultural resistances over time. Questions of race/ethnicity, class, gender and age will be addressed as we trace the meanings and representations of youth reactions to industrial and post-industrial societies within and across their highly ambiguous political and cultural locations. Students will be expected to carry out small research projects that in some way reflect the transgressive practices, rituals and possibilities of youth in the late modern metropolis. 
 
The seminar has two major goals: (i) to explore the range of sociological theories that explain youth social and cultural resistance, and (ii) to critically interpret the different forms that this resistance takes in the context of an evolving and highly contradictory transnationalist capitalist order. We will focus in particular on the origins of youth subcultures as they emerge during both modernity and late modernity and their construction within changing notions of criminal and non-criminal deviance.

   
##################################################################
##############################################################

 

FALL 2013

 

ASCP. 81000 – Introduction to American Studies  GC: R, 4:15-6:15pm, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Entin [22187] Cross listed with MALS 73100. 

George Lipsitz and Barbara Tomlinson open the March 2013 issue of American Quarterly with the assertion that this is “no ordinary time for American studies. It has never been more difficult—yet never more important—to explain how the abstract idea of ‘America’ works in the world, to analyze the social relations it both enables and inhibits, to examine both the bright promises and the bitter betrayals of egalitarian and democratic aspirations that are voiced in its name. At this moment of danger, scholars in the field are asking, where does American studies stand and what do we do now?” What is American studies? What is its object, and what kinds of study does it enable? What can it do, and where does it “stand” in the contemporary intellectual, cultural, and political landscape? This course will explore these questions by considering the histories, theories, and practices of American studies as an interdisciplinary field, from its inception as an academic discipline in the 1930s and 1940s, into an institutionalized scholarly field represented by one of the largest and most widely recognized annual academic conferences in the United States. Generally organized as a program and not a department, American studies resides somewhere between (or, perhaps, outside) normative disciplinary boundaries and in sometimes productive, sometimes uneasy relations to the other “studies” that have been created in part on its model. During this semester we will consider the complexity inherent in this model, as we trace the influence of both foundational and emerging work in American studies. We will also consider the different meanings that American studies has (and has had) for different disciplines, and attempt to take stock of its current position in the academy, in the wider world, and in our own work.


ASCP. 81500 - American Politics   GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Jones, [22202] Cross listed with P Sc. 72000   

This course is designed to introduce students to the key approaches, authors, and arguments in the broad field of American politics. The structure of the course follows the tradition of dividing the field into two main overarching subfields: political behavior and political institutions. The political behavior section of the course will cover topics such as public opinion, political participation, parties, voting and elections, and interest groups. The political institutions section of the course will cover topics such as Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the courts. Course readings draw heavily from the program’s reading list for the First Exam in American politics, with an emphasis on seminal, widely cited, theoretical works in each area.

ASCP. 81500 - Critical Childhood/Youth Studies  GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Luttrell, [22219] Cross listed with U ED 75100 and WSCP 81000  

Critical Childhood Studies (sometimes called the “new sociology/anthropology of childhood” understands youth as social actors who are “central informants of their own life worlds” (Christensen and James 2008). Not incomplete adults but human subjects who have insights, they contribute to as well as are shaped by social institutions. This course will examine the basic tenants of critical childhood studies, including the ways in which it contests the traditional socialization model, which emphasizes children as passive recipients of a unidirectional socialization process. A critical childhood studies approach understands child-adult relationships as existing within power relations-- therefore, Waksler’s (1996) argument that “children do not have the power to correct adults’ misunderstandings of them.” The new sociology of childhood critiques the “old” sociology of childhood that ignored the significant effects of adults always speaking for children, the ease of which “effectively silenced” children. Rejecting neither the idea that children develop nor that children are dependent on adults, the new sociology of childhood suggests, rather, that thinking of the relationship in terms of interdependence rather than deficiency, and acknowledging the lack of authority that children have in their relationships with adults, recognizes the differences in power relations and works toward understanding agency. As Lee (2001) asks, what does it mean to take children seriously? The dangers of romanticizing children’s voice will be considered as well. How does the new sociology of childhood intersect with critical theory, disability studies, feminist theory and critical race theory?

This class will examine the conceptual framework of the new sociology of childhood (and youth), and study its politics and implications for research. It will imagine generational difference as a border, and look at research that enables us to understand children and youth relative to power relations, authority, culture, education and punishment. It will also look at adults with whom children are in relationship, including parents, teachers, police, salespeople, and counselors, as well as the institutions, discourses and systems that shape how childhood is experienced. We will ask methodological questions about how to study children from the standpoint of the new sociology of childhood.

ASCP. 81500 - Critical Literacies/Education GC:  Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Garcia, [22218] Cross listed with U ED 71200   

This course engages with the possibilities that literacies offer for social change, economic equity, and political enfranchisement. It considers literacies as social practices related to broader social and political concerns that includes feminist and poststructuralist orientations, Freirean-based critical pedagogy, and text analytic approaches. Adopting a social approach to literacy and language, this course considers ethnographic studies of literacy in historical, social, and cultural contexts. It also surveys histories of literacy expansion and literacy campaigns worldwide, and evaluates contemporary literacy policies and programs. To do this work, we rely on concepts from and debates in anthropology, sociolinguistics, and applied linguistics, as well as critical studies of education.
 
ASCP. 81500 - Critical Reason: The Basics   GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Buck-Morss, [22201] Cross listed with P Sc. 71902

This course deals with basic concepts and problems of western Critical Theory. The readings will be limited to three key authors: Kant, Hegel and Adorno. The required texts are:

Immanuel Kant, The Critique of Pure Reason (Cambridge U Press)
Theodor W. Adorno, Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (Stanford U Press)
G.W.F. Hegel, The Phenomenology of Sprit (Oxford U Press)
Theodor W. Adorno, Lectures on Negative Dialectics (Stanford U Press)

Philosophy will be considered from the perspective of the political. Concepts include: critical reason, transcendental claims, phenomenology, dialectics, non-identity, materialist metaphysics, history, causality, and freedom. We will tackle difficult texts with the goal of developing critical capacities in order to analyze political, social and economic life. The challenge will be to make the concepts of the readings critically meaningful as you think about politics and theory today.

Requirements: sustained, active seminar participation, one short midterm paper, and final paper (or exam option).

ASCP. 81500 - Environmental History of Urban America  GC:  R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Rawson, [22196] Cross listed with HIST 75800

Americans often think of cities and nature as being mutually exclusive. “As the pavement spreads,” wrote the great urbanist Lewis Mumford, “nature is pushed farther away.” But in recent years, scholars in the growing field of urban environmental history have been challenging this view and arguing instead that cities and the natural world have deep connections and shared histories. With urbanization a central theme of the American story, and over eighty percent of present-day Americans living in urban areas, we cannot fully understand the American past or even the places that most of us call home today without understanding how nature and cities have shaped each other. Over the course of the semester, students will explore such topics as early reactions to industrialization and urbanization; relationships between cities and their hinterlands; urban interactions with water; moral environmentalism and the development of public parks and suburbs; concerns about pollution, public health, and environmental justice; and the consequences of contemporary urban sprawl. Readings will include William Cronon, Nature’s Metropolis; Michael Rawson, Eden on the Charles; Mike Davis, Ecology of Fear; Adam Rome, The Bulldozer in the Countryside; and others.
 
ASCP. 81500 - Experimental Selves/Graphic Subjects GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Miller, [22195] Cross listed with ENGL 87500 and WSCP 81000

“I do not know how far I differ from other people,” Virginia Woolf remarks in “A Sketch of the Past,” neatly summarizing the memoirist’s dilemma. In this course we will explore the process of self-representation in the works of twentieth and twenty-first century writers and artists for whom questions of identity have produced experiments in form.  In addition to literary and graphic memoirs, we will discuss photographs, visual essays, and critical issues in contemporary autobiography. Writers include: Roland Barthes, David B., Alison Bechdel, Zora Neale Hurston, Maxine Hong Kingston, Adrienne Rich, Marjane Satrapi, Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf and others.  Work for the course: in class presentations and a final paper.
 
ASCP. 81500 - Gender/Media/Crime/Culture GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Chancer, [22212] Cross listed with SOC 82800 and WSCP 81000   

This course will explore a fascinating selection of sociological literature that combines, in myriad ways and through the use of diverse methodologies, the subject matters of gender, crime, media and culture. The first part of the course will offer students an overview of different theoretical perspectives currently exerting influence in the sociological subfields of gender, crime, media and culture respectively. In the second part of the course, we will turn to research in substantive topic areas. Among the topics covered will be school violence cases, domestic violence, sex work, gang research and the gendered division of labor in legal (as well as illegal) occupations.

ASCP. 81500 - History & Aesthetics of Film Music  GC:  R, 1:30-5:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Brown, [22199] Cross listed with MUS 81502 and FSCP 81000

ASCP. 81500 - Humanism and the Animal Body  GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Reid-Pharr, [22193] Cross listed with ENGL. 80600 and WSCP 81000
 

Challenging the Cartesian distinction between man as a distinct “thinking animal” and all other animal species, we will work in this seminar to examine what possibilities are available to us if we pry open the human/animal divide. What happens when we take seriously the reality of the constant and necessary intermingling of species? Moreover, how does such an awareness impact our continued discussions of the interaction between various types of human communities? Each seminar participant will do an in class presentation and submit a research paper. Texts that we will examine include Jacques Derrida, The Animal That Therefore I Am; Giorgio Agamben, The Open: Man and Animal; Donna Haraway, When Species Meet; Matthew Calarco, Zoographies: The Question of the Animal from Heiddeger to Derrida; Cary Wolfe, Animal Rites: American Culture, the Discourse of Species, and Posthumanist Theory; Michael Serres, The Parasite; Kari Weil, Thinking Animals: Why Animal Studies Now?; J.M. Coetzee, The Lives of Animals; Paola Cavalieri, The Animal Question: Why Nonhuman Animals Deserve Human Rights; Bruno Latour, We Have Never Been Modern; Anna L. Peterson, Being Human: Ethics, Environment, and Our Place in the World; Cary Wolfe, What is Post-Humanism?; and Donna Haraway, Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention of Nature.

ASCP. 81500 - Literature of American History I  GC:  W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Burke, [22197] course open to Ph.D. students in History only. Cross listed with HIST 80000   

ASCP. 81500 - Performance Criticism in Neoliberal Time  GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wickstrom, [22214] Cross listed with THEA 80400

In October, 2012 Theatre Journal issued a volume concerned with objects in the theatre, with things. The Drama Review issued a volume on precarity. Through both volumes run the concurrent themes of labor, theatrical labor and otherwise, and time, all kinds of time. As a companion to the TDR issue, Women in Performance will be issuing a volume on performance and precarity in March, 2013. Along with the 2013 Performance Studies International conference that is focused on temporality, the emergence of these three special issues at the same time would seem to indicate something about the interface of theatre with precarity, things, labor, and temporalities that needs to trouble and inspire our work now. Further, the analytic term neoliberalism is becoming more and more ubiquitous in our scholarship, begging the question of what are the pressures and sensibilities of this neoliberal time that seem to be resulting in these particular trends and concerns among scholars and practitioners. This course is designed for students to travel through the scholarship and performances that are developing these trends, in order to weigh them, to evaluate them, and to test them for their potential value to each student. The journal volumes cited above will form the initial centerpiece of the class, which will be simultaneously a study of the function of the “special issue” in scholarship, the structure of such issues, and the kinds of inter-questions, or inter-ideas such issues can create. We’ll follow many of the “leads” in the two journals, seeing where these take us in terms of extending the discussion and source material. These will include reading some of the philosophy and political science that is informing “precarity, things, labor, and temporality”. We’ll also rely on other sources, including work by performance scholars, plays, and performances, which can extend, illuminate or illustrate particular applications of these themes. In addition to the journals listed above, material for the course may include work by Bruno Latour, Maurizio Lazzarato, Martin Welton, Jane Bennett, Bill Brown, Shannon Jackson, Giulia Palladini, Rebecca Schneider, Maurya Wickstrom, Nick Ridout, Nigel Stewart, Cary Wolf, Paolo Virno, Karl Marx, Graham Harman, Tidal: Occupy Theory, Occupy Strategy, Pig Iron Theatre, and others. An attempt will be made to include plays and performance from periods earlier than our own that provide interesting case studies of these themes. Students will be required to submit two 3-4 page response papers in the course of the semester, and complete a 15-20 page term paper at the end of the semester.

ASCP. 81500 - Seminar in American History I  GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Robertson, [22198] Course is open to Ph.D. students in History only. Cross listed with HIST 84900

This seminar is designed to train incoming graduate students in the craft of historical research and writing. Over the course of the term, each student will formulate a research topic, prepare a bibliography of relevant primary and secondary sources, write an historiographic essay, and present and defend a formal project proposal for the substantial research paper that is to be completed in the second semester seminar. Weekly meetings will discuss common readings, share and critique written work, and develop and refine the research proposals. We will also be devoting some time to methods and issues involved in undergraduate teaching.
 

ASCP. 81500 - Sociology of Gender  GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Eisenstein, [22206] Cross listed with SOC 73200 and WSCP 81000

This course is an introduction to the sociology of gender, and can be used by students to prepare for an orals field in gender. Topics to be covered will include some of the following: gender and imperialism; globalization and women’s labor; race, class and the critique of intersectionality; feminist/womanist theory; the body, sexuality and heteronormativity; families and housework; incarceration and gender; capitalism, consumerism, and the uses of gender identity; reproductive rights and population control; violence and rape culture; migration; public life, neoliberalism and welfare; Islam, Christianity and the state; and colonialism and indigenous identities. Guest lecturers from Sociology and other GC programs will be invited to join us during the semester.

ASCP. 81500 - The Black Pacific GC:  M, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Chuh, [22194] Cross listed with ENGL 80600 and WSCP 81000

This course takes as its point of departure Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double-Consciousness, first published in 1993, to open questions about space, race, and history.  In what ways are critical engagements with race subtended by naturalized or occluded spatial protocols?  Is blackness a meaningful category when located within the frame of the Pacific?  What is the relationship between blackness and Asiatic racialization when situated in this way?  What might we learn not only about geography and history as technologies of racialization by thinking and working through the construct of “the black Pacific”?  What kinds of politics and ethics emerge from thinking “the black Pacific”?  How do the insights garnered by thinking through this construct compel the rearticulation of the ways in which literary and other studies are divided by place and time, and in what ways?  Students enrolled in this course should read Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic prior to and in preparation for the first day of class.  Other texts for this course will include work by Brent Edwards, Christopher Connery, Saidiya Hartman, Edward Said, Joseph Roach, Kuan-Hsing Chen, Lisa Lowe, Bill Mullen, Lisa Yoneyama, Marc Gallichio, Taketani Etsuko, Yusef Komunyakaa, John Russell, Yasuhiro Okada, Langston Hughes, Velina Hasu Houston, Jessica Hagedorn, Monique Truong, and Martin Luther King, Jr. among others.  Students taking the course for 2-credits should expect to present to class a 10-page paper that addresses the issues of the class or to produce an equivalent assignment; students taking the course for 4-credits should expect to write one short papers and a 15-20 page paper.  Everyone is, of course, expected to participate fully in class discussions.

ASCP. 81500 - Urban Sociology GC:  M, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kasinitz, [22205] Cross listed with SOC 72500 

This course will survey sociological work on the city as both a spatial location and a social institution. We will discuss the relationship of urbanism and modernity, debates over the role of “community” in urban life, the “Chicago School” and political economy approaches, ghettos, neighborhoods, neighborhood chance, ethnic enclaves, the sociology of the built environment, the role of public space in urban life, the importance of culture and consumption in shaping the urban experience and the impact of globalization on contemporary cities. Readings will include works by Georg Simmel, Walter Benjamin, Le Corbusier, Jane Jacobs, Marshall Berman, Herbert Gans, Richard Sennett, Mike Davis, Loic Wacquant, Mitchell Duneier, Elijah Anderson, William Julius Wilson, Alejandro Portes, Rob Sampson, David Harvey and Sharon Zukin.

ASCP. 81500 - Women, Work & Public Policy   GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Gornick/Milkman, [22204] Cross listed with P Sc. 72500, SOC 83300 and WSCP 81000  

This course is an overview of key issues affecting women in the 21st century workplace in affluent industrialized countries. We begin with an overview of women’s position in the contemporary labor market, examining the changes and continuities in patterns of gender inequality, such as job segregation by gender and the pay gap between male and female workers. Here we also pay close attention to the impact of growing class inequalities, which have led to increasing polarization in the labor market between college-educated women and those with less education. We also consider divisions along lines of race, ethnicity and nativity, and examine the recent rise of the “precariat” – workers who have little or no employment security and who are often excluded from basic legal protections that once covered the bulk of the workforce. Women are overrepresented in the precariat, especially in part-time and temporary jobs, which are disproportionately female. We look at the ways in which public policy initiatives – such as affirmative action, equal pay laws, and anti-discrimination measures have addressed these issues, and evaluate their impact, and consider additional challenges that remain.

The course also examines the effects on women workers – of all classes, races, and ethnic groups, and of immigrants as well as natives – of inequalities in the division of labor in the household. Despite the massive increase in female labor force participation over the past half century, women continue to perform the bulk of unpaid housework and childcare, and bringing about change in this arena has proven even more challenging than transforming the social structures defining paid work. We will consider recent research on the effects of so-called “work-family reconciliation policies” – that is, public policies aimed at supporting women (and men) as they balance the responsibilities of paid work and family care. The key question now under consideration is whether some of these policies – e.g., paid family leave, rights to part-time and flexible scheduling – create new forms of gender inequality. The rapid growth of paid care jobs, which are overwhelmingly filled by women, is another topic of interest here.

Throughout, we take a comparative approach to these questions, examining the situation in the United States as well as in other high-income countries.


ASCP. 81500 - Gladiatrices in American Art:  Women in the Artistic Sphere1848-1920  GC:  M, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Manthorne, [22191] Cross listed wth ART 87300 & WSCP 81000. Course open to Art History Ph.D. students only, permission required for all others.  

Gladiatrix was the female equivalent to a male gladiator, a trained combatant. The women we explore in this seminar were just that: painters, sculptors, critics, photographers, printmakers, gallery owners, historians and collectors who battled to shape the cultural realm. We discover that the American art world as currently outlined in survey books and courses has omitted an entire network of accomplished women that we aim to reinsert into the narrative. Taking our cues from Women’s History Studies, we address important questions in the social history of art and women’s rights from the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 to the passing of the 19th Amendment in 1920, guaranteeing all American women the right to vote. Together we investigate a wide array of historical figures and enterprises, aided by a growing bibliography in the field and accessible art collections. 5 auditors permitted, only by permission of the instructor. Requirements:  Weekly reading assignments & discussion; visits to art collections; final, 20-page research paper including related abstract, annotated bibliography, and short oral presentation.
Preliminary Readings:  April F. Masten, Art Work. Women Artists and Democracy in Mid-Nineteenth Century New York. (Philadelphia: U. of Pennsylvania Press, 2008).
Kirsten Swinth, Painting Professionals. Women Artists & the Development of Modern American Art, 1870-1930. (Chapel Hill & London: U. North Carolina Press, 2001).
 

ASCP 81500- American Aesthetics: Out of the Ordinary  GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Richardson, [22337] Cross listed with ENGL. 80200

The syllogism suggested in my grouping as I have the figures who will anchor discussions over the term plays around the signal importance in which William James held Emerson, Wittgenstein held James, and Stanley Cavell holds both Emerson and Wittgenstein. Emerson repeatedly and variously described as one of the aims of his lecturing and writing to show the ordinary to be extraordinary, wake us to the constant and magnificent mystery in which we are suspended: “Sleep lingers all our lifetime about our eyes, as night hovers all day in the boughs of the fir-tree…. All things swim and glitter.” James investigated and naturalized this aspect, admitting religious experience in its myriad forms as intrinsic to human nature, describing even the philosophical method identified with his name as participating in this activity: “Pragmatism…she widens the field of search for God.” Wittgenstein kept The Varieties of Religious Experience on the bookshelf above his desk throughout his life after his first reading in 1912 when he was a student of philosophy at Cambridge and wrote to his teacher Bertrand Russell, “Whenever I have time now I read James’s Varieties of Religious Experience. This book does me a lot [Wittgenstein’s emphasis] of good.” Cavell’s particular aspiration is to square the circle, so to speak, demonstrate that Wittgenstein’s ambition “to bring words back home from their metaphysical to ordinary use,” is grounded in the intellectual revolution sparked in 1836 by Emerson’s anonymously published, azure-covered volume Nature and epitomized, for Cavell, in his 1844 essay “Experience.” Tracing the path uncovered in this recuperation—through Emerson’s and Thoreau’s “Eastern longings,” through Nietzsche’s strong reading of Emerson, through John Dewey’s first naming of Emerson not only as a philosopher but as “The Philosopher of Democracy” and his own internalization of the centrality of “experience”—to continuing forms of secular revelation will provide the direction of this seminar. There will be readings from each of the major figures mentioned here, of course, plus related material as appropriate to the shapes taken by the ongoing conversation. Topics will include the nature of language games and of “passionate utterance,” what Russell queried as “mysticism and logic,” pragmatism versus “pragmaticism” in relation to language, skepticism, ordinary language philosophy and performance, moods, moral perfectionism, genius, and, always, the very slippery ordinary: “We live amid surfaces, and the true art of life is to skate well on them.”
 
ASCP 81500 - People of New York City  GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Helmreich, [22340] Cross listed with SOC. 82301

This course looks at the different neighborhoods/communities that make up this great and fascinating city. Its focus is on the different ethnic, religious, and racial groups in the city and their social and cultural life-----Hispanics, Jews, Arabs, Asians, African Americans, Greeks, Italians, and people of differing socioeconomic and gender groups. In addition, we will be looking at the neighborhoods themselves, their architectural and spatial characteristics, how and why they grew, and how they function as communities. An integral part of the course will be field work---visiting and studying the areas-----Bensonhurst, Carroll Gardens, Gerritsen Beach, the South Bronx, Chelsea, Glendale, Maspeth, Harlem, etc., etc. Readings will reflect the above topics.

ASCP. 82000 -  Culture & Society in 19th-Century New York: Washington Irving-Coney Island  GC:  R, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Lott, [21568]

Framed by notable recent debates in and constellations of American Studies scholarship, this course will examine key cultural and social formations in the tumultuous development of nineteenth-century New York City, so serving as an advanced introduction to both.  We will trace out the lines of fracture and dissent that shaped the transformation of New York, from the writing of Irving and Cooper early in the century to the administered leisure of Coney Island at the turn of the twentieth.  Topics to be taken up may include romanticism and real estate (Cooper, the Hudson River School painters, the construction of Central Park); what Georg Simmel called the metropolis and mental life (Melville, Poe, Buntline, Howells, Crane); evangelical abolitionism and the minstrel show’s racism; “manifest domesticity” at the intersection of popular women’s fiction, the slave narrative, and haute magazine writing (possibly through a focus on magazinist N.P. Willis, his housekeeper Harriet Jacobs, and his sister, the writer Fanny Fern); the self-inventions and cultural interventions of P.T. Barnum and Walt Whitman; underground or alternative sexualities (the flash press, sexual subcultures); crowds and power—the class divisions (and political formations) behind the Astor Place Riot, the Draft Riots, and the great labor uprisings of the 70s and 80s; post-Civil War embourgeoisement and the patrician enclaves of James and Wharton; the new-immigrant and -migrant New York of vaudeville and coon show, documentary photography and Abraham Cahan; Jose Marti in New York exile and the imperial adventurisms of 1898.  Current scholarly interest in questions of temporality, fantasy, affect, print capitalism, transnationalism, and periodization itself will punctuate our inquiries; the recent formation of the nineteenth-century Americanist group C19 (and its new journal J19) will offer us additional texts and perspectives for thought.  Ultimately it will be our business to think about where key debates in the field may be tending in the years ahead and to develop an engagement with American Studies professional practices—conferences, lectures, panels, journals—in which you will be encouraged to participate.

ASCP. 82000 - Write Like a Man: Baldwin, Mailer and the Flowering of  American  Masculinity  GC:  T, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Dolan, [22260] Cross listed with ENGL 88100

Using one of the most unlikely (and briefest) literary friendships as its nexus,this seminar will examine the varieties of manhood and masculinity that permeated late-twentieth-century literary culture, particularly as they were inflected by sexual orientation, race,and nationhood/transnationality. The preliminary syllabus for the course will pair roughly analogous readings by James Baldwin and Norman Mailer (e.g.,Go ndtw16 Tel/It on the Mountain with The Naked and the Dead; Giovanni's Room with selections from Advertisements for Myself; Another Country with An American Dream; The Evidence of Things Not Seen withain  The Executioner's Song), but further readings will be adjusted based on student interest. Given our two core writers, explorations of the inscribed masculinities of American Beat culture and French existentialism, for example, seem far from unlikely. Students of all disciplines and methodological stripes (e.g., African American Studies ,Feminist Studies, Gay and Lesbian Studies, Ethnic Studies, American Studies, Cultural Studies, Comparative Literature, unreconstructed Structuralism, abiding admiration for Franco Moretti) are heartily and vigorously encouraged to enroll. Seminars can be awfully boring if everyone in them agrees a priori on what is important. Course requirements include participation; one brief presentation and bibliography on the scholarship relating to a text we are reading in common; and a bibliography, longer presentation, and term paper on a work/author that we are not reading in common.

ASCP. 82000 - Citizenship & Human Rights GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Turner, [22295] Cross listed with SOC 84600


The course is divided in two sections, staring with citizenship and its recent critics, and then moving on to human rights and its critics. We finish with some consideration as to whether these two different forms of rights could be combined. Citizenship as a principle of inclusion is criticised because it cannot cope adequately with globalization (including migration, refugees, asylum seekers and so forth). Some sociologists believe we can modify citizenship to develop flexible citizenship or semi-citizenship or post-national citizenship. Human rights are seen to be more relevant to a global world but critics note that they are enforced by states, and require the resources made available by states. The course looks at the apparent decline of welfare states and citizenship with neo-liberal economics and neo-conservative politics. We also examine differences between the American tradition of civil liberties and European welfare states. Other
topics include aboriginal or first nation rights, migration, documentation and citizenship, ageing and health rights. We look at different forms of citizenship in Latin America, Asia and the Middle East. The course concludes by considering the contemporary limitations of both citizenship and human rights traditions with respect to authoritarianism, genocide, and new wars.

ASCP. 82000 - The Politics of Experience: Countercultures in the Age of Decolonization   GC:  R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Alcalay, [22258] Cross listed with ENGL 86000   

Through a range of diverse sources, we will trace the emergence of North American countercultures in the context of the Cold War and decolonization, with a special emphasis on the domestic effects of the American war in Vietnam and foreign policy in general, particularly regarding the Middle East. Along the way, we will consider Amiri Baraka’s 1960 visit to Cuba, and the enormous political, historical, and ideological significance of the war to liberate Algeria from French colonial rule. By looking at various materials, evidence, and testimony (including film), we will explore how different archives, memories, and histories are created, transmitted, suppressed or obliterated. Films may include: Bunker Hill 1956 (Kent Mackenzie, 1956), The Exiles (Kent Mackenzie, 1961), The Connection (Shirley Clarke, 1962), The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966), Winter Soldier (Winterfilm, 1972), Killer of Sheep (Charles Burnett, 1977), The War At Home (Glenn Silber, 1979), Passin’ It On (Jon Valadez, 1993), Code Name Artichoke (Egmont Koch, 2002), What We Want, What We Believe: The Black Panther Party Library (Roz Payne Archives & Newsreel Films, 1967-2006), Sir, No Sir (David Zeiger, 2005) Primary texts may include: The Poetry and Life of Allen Ginsberg: A Narrative Poem (Ed Sanders),  Echo Tree: The Collected Short Fiction (Henry Dumas),  A Simple Revolution (Judy Grahn),  Recollections of My Life As A Woman (Diane di Prima) Also works by Toni Cade Bambara, Amiri Baraka, Lucia Berlin, Jayne Cortez, Diane di Prima, Edward Dorn, Robert Duncan, Juan Felipe Herrera, Hettie Jones, Bob Kaufman, Audre Lorde, Eugene Redmond, Muriel Rukeyser, Michael Rumaker, Hubert Selby, Lorenzo Thomas, Janine Pomy Vega, Diane Wakoski, John Wieners, Douglas Woolf, and others. Background texts may include: Hearts and Minds: Bodies, Poetry, and Resistance in the Vietnam Era (Michael Bibby), Black Against Empire: The History & Politics of the Black Panther Party (Joshua Bloom, Waldo E. Martin Jr.), Discourse on Colonialism (Aimé Cesaire), “After Mecca” Women Poets & the Black Arts Movement (Cheryl Clarke); The Wretched of the Earth (Franz Fanon), Vietnam & Other American Fantasies (H. Bruce Franklin), Franz Fanon: A Critical Approach (Irene Gendzier), Another Mother Tongue (Judy Grahn), Uncivil War: Intellectuals and Identity Politics During the Decolonization of Algeria (James D. Le Sueur), Epic Encounters (Melani McAlister), The Portable Malcolm X Reader (Manning Marable, Garrett Felber), On the Walls and in the Streets: American Poetry Broadsides from the 1960s (James D. Sullivan).

Research topics for possible Lost & Found projects will be carried out individually or collectively and can focus on a number of areas:connections between cultural figures of the 1930s and those of the 1950s

a. connections between cultural figures of the 1930s and those of the 1950s

b. investigation into lesser known work emerging from various movements: Umbra, the Black Arts movement, Nuyorican & Chicano/a writers, the anti-war movement, gay liberation, the women’s movement etc.

c. the pedagogy of writers, whether in or out of institutionalized settings (for example, an exploration of teaching materials by Adrienne Rich, Toni Cade, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, Larry Neal, and others, who all taught at CUNY during open admissions, as well as lectures by Diane di Prima, Gregory Corso, Philip Whalen, and others).

d. connections across the arts (between writers & musicians, visual artists, dancers etc.)

ASCP. 82000 - Democratic Theory  GC:  M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wallach, [22278] Cross listed with P Sc 80402

This seminar offers an intense study of “democracy” as a form of political life in historical and contemporary Western political theory. Insofar as “democracy” has become ubiquitous as a term of political art, pinpointing what it does and does not, can and cannot mean, is a difficult and perplexing task. After all, “democracy” originally referred to “rule” (kratos) by “the people” (demos), but Athenian democracy was severely limited by contemporary standards of human liberty and equality. In turn, claiming that “the people” rule in any contemporary state is problematic at best. Nonetheless, we shall undertake the task as a meaningful one, by interpreting “classic” historical texts and more contemporary accounts that theoretically articulate the meaning and prospects of democracy.

The class is divided into two parts, each covering seven weeks (one-half) of the term. Part I covers basic theoretical analyses of “democracy” in the history of Western political thought from ancient Greece to the twentieth century--principally in relation to notions of “virtue,” “representation,” “liberalism,” and various kinds of “state.” Some familiarity with that history is presupposed. (This course is not constructed so as to serve as a primer for the First Exam.) Part II deals with relatively recent theoretical accounts of the meaning of democracy along with its relationship to current political problems—particularly those that engage questions about a contemporary demos, the criterion of legitimacy, transnational power, crises of collective life, and globalized notions of human rights. Readings will be drawn from (but not limited to) texts by Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Federalists, Mill, Marx, Michels, Arendt, Rawls, Habermas, Foucault, Wolin, Ranciere.


ASCP. 82000 - Educating Educators GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Michelli, [22297] Cross listed with U ED 75100 

In this seminar we will engage in a deep analysis of policy, practice, and research related to how educators are prepared in the United States with special focus on urban education. You will engage in reading, discussion and research around critical questions central to the field including the influence of federal policy, the connection between research and policy, the application of high stakes testing to teacher education, the privatization of teacher education, the rise of alternate pathways to teaching and major changes in accreditation. Class sessions will include, where possible, discussions with leaders in teacher education such as policy makers, researchers, administrators and faculty in teacher education as well as candidates in teacher education programs from a several settings. Many graduates of the Ph.D. program in Urban Education have entered careers as teacher educators. This seminar is designed to give you an "insider view" of the issues surrounding the profession.

ASCP. 82000 - Education's Digital Future  GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Brier/Picciano, [22298] Cross listed with U ED 75100

This seminar will critically examine technology influences on teaching and learning in higher education in the present and in the near future. Online learning, blended learning, social media, MOOCs, open source content, and other elements of modern technology will be examined in terms of their philosophical, pedagogical, social and career implications for faculty in American higher education institutions. This seminar will also adopt a critical lens in examining technology initiatives supported by private interest groups that have come to permeate American education. The seminar facilitators will draw upon a wide range of scholarly readings and electronic media as well as explore practical ramifications of the growing influence of digital technology on teaching and learning.


ASCP. 82000 - Immigrant Groups/City Politics  GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Mollenkopf, [22285] Cross listed with P Sc 83800, SOC 82800 and WSCP 81000

Since 1965, the U.S. has accepted 34 million foreign born people for permanent residence in the U.S., and perhaps another 11 million entered without authorization and remain. The most recent data from the 2012 American Community Survey found that almost 13 percent of the population was foreign born and another 12 percent had at least one foreign born parent. Seventy percent of the foreign born live in six large immigrant receiving states and more than half live in nine large metropolitan areas. More than a third live in the Los Angeles and New York metro areas alone.

These large flows of people from Latin America, the Caribbean, East and South Asia, and Eastern Europe are steadily diversifying the racial and ethnic composition of these already cosmopolitan cities and metropolitan regions. Ultimately, they will have a major impact on urban and national politics and we can think of cities like New York and Los Angeles of harbingers of the ways in which the nation as a whole will encounter and responds to new forms of difference. The economic, social, and political incorporation of these new Americans will be the primary civil rights challenge of the 21st century, just as the struggle for African American inclusion was in the 20th century – and that of white immigrants beginning in the 19th.

This course will use New York City and its surrounding metropolitan area as a laboratory for understanding the political dimension of this process – the ways in which new immigrant communities are coming of age politically, organizing to interact with local political systems, and seeking to increase their political influence. This process begins with increased citizenship, voter registration, active voting, and mobilizing to support candidates, but extends to building coalitions and forming part of a governing majority. It will review theories of political incorporation based on both the 19th century European and the 20th century African-American experiences and then carefully examine specific groups in and around New York City today. With assistance from the instructor, students will carry out primary research on the political dynamics of one group. The course will conclude by discussing comparisons across groups, with a focus on their experience in the 2013 mayoral and council elections.

ASCP. 82000 - International Security  GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Liberman, [22276] Cross listed with P Sc 86801 

This course examines contemporary theory-testing research in security studies. Topics examined include the sources of peace and war, coercion, strategy, arms races, alliances, international institutions designed to control arms and conflict. For the most part the focus is on states, but we will also examine insurgencies and terrorism insofar as these has international reach, and can be illuminated with approaches developed within the international security field. The works studied represent diverse theoretical approaches, including systemic, domestic politics, and political psychology, and diverse methodologies. A research paper is required, but the course also will provide a helpful overview of the international security subfield.


ASCP. 82000 - Language, Culture, Disability: Psychological Perspectives  GC:  M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bursztyn, [22299] Cross listed with U ED 75100  

This seminar addresses childhood disability in the context of linguistic and cultural diversity in urban schools and communities. The seminar will offer a thematic approach to a range of topics including the roles of language and culture in child and adolescent development; the impact of disability on learning, social integration, and identity formation; and the specific challenges faced by immigrant children with special needs in schools and communities. The aim of this seminar is to study the implications for intervention, teaching and educational policy development with diverse students.  The course presents perspectives on language, culture, and disabilities through selected case studies, documentary films and literature.

ASCP. 82000 - Latin American Modernisms: 1915-1945  GC:  W, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Indych-Lopez, [22252] Open to Ph.D. Art History students, permission required for all others. Cross listed with ART 77400

This course is an overview of the various currents of modernism that developed in Latin America in the first half of the twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on the artistic production of artistic centers, such as São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Havana, and Montevideo.  Discussions will focus on the conditions of modernity in the region, representations of race, class, and gender, artistic responses to colonialism, nationalism, modernization, exile, revolution, and the heterogeneous forms of vanguard movements that emerged often as a result of trans-Atlantic and international exchange.  We will examine the strategic theoretical writings of artists and cultural thinkers as they forged urban, nationalist, regional, or universalist movements and cultural practices, examining Latin America’s contributions to global modernism.  No auditors permitted.

Requirements: Regular attendance, weekly readings, participation in discussion, oral presentation on readings, midterm, and final exam.

Preliminary Readings:  Achugar, Hugo. “Latin American Modernities.” In Alfredo Boulton and His Contemporaries: Critical Dialogues in Venezuelan Art, 1912–1974. Ed. Ariel Jiménez. New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2008.  García Canclini, Néstor.  “Modernity after Postmodernity.” In Beyond the Fantastic:Contemporary Art Criticism from Latin America. Ed. Gerardo Mosquera.  Cambridge: MIT Press, 1996. 
Pratt, Mary Louise. “Modernity and Periphery.” In Beyond Dichotomies: Histories, Identities, Cultures, and the Challenge of Globalization. Ed. Elisabeth Mudimbe-boyi. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2002.

ASCP. 82000 - Music & Culture: US in the 1970's  GC:  M/F, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Taylor, [22270] Cross listed with MUS 86600 

During the 1970s composers and musicians dealt with the legacy of the 1960s, while facing a severe economic downturn. The continuing war in Vietnam, the fracturing of the Civil Rights Movement, the continued expansion of Second-Wave Feminism, political scandals, the rise of environmentalism, as well as new advances in electronics and recording technology impacting virtually all areas of American music. This course takes a cross-genre approach, dealing with popular music (soul, funk, hard rock, punk, the beginnings of hip hop), the “art music” sphere (particularly minimalism and electronic music), and other categories that are difficult to classify (such as trends in jazz “fusion” and Afrocentrism). Though readings will taken from a wide variety of primary and secondary sources, a central focus will be on listening—both in and out of class. The course will explore work by musicians and groups as diverse as Steve Reich, George Crumb, P-Funk, Stevie Wonder, Miles Davis, Pharoah Sanders, and The Ramones.

ASCP. 82000 - Movements/Elections/Interest Groups  GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Fox Piven, [22282] Cross listed with P Sc 82001, SOC 84600 and WSCP 81000

This course will attempt to put it all together, to analyze how social movements, powerful interest groups, and the parties, campaigns and voters which are supposed to be the mainstay of democracy, interact and combine to shape public policy and ultimately American society. To try to gain traction on these big dynamics, we will first consider the paradigms that guide the study of movements, interest group politics and elections, each considered separately. Then we will select a number of turning points in American political development in which the distinct forces mobilized in movements, interest groups, and elections were activated to gain state power and determine policy outcomes. I want especially to consider the interaction, of movements and elections, of elections and moneyed interests, for example. Citizens United and the Tea Party are new, but the dynamics they generate when they conflict or combine are not.


ASCP. 82000 - Paths, Detours, and Barriers to Citizenship: Immigrants, Refugees, Aliens and Outsiders in US history, Law and Culture  GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Nasaw, [22265] Cross listed with HIST 75700

We will interrogate the sometimes conflicting, sometimes consonant, but always changing relationships between notions of citizenship—and its cultural significance, political resonance, and legal entitlements—and American immigration policy. While attentive to European migrations from the seventeenth to the twenty-first centuries, we will focus on twentieth and twenty-first century border crossings from Mexico, immigrations from Asia, the discordant and unintended consequences of post-World War II legislation.

The readings will explore the separate but entwined historical literatures on “citizenship” and “immigration.” I have designed them to be global in reach and interdisciplinary in perspective.

Students may be asked to write short papers in the course of the semester and a major final paper in the form of a “lecture” to undergraduates on the themes and issues discussed in the readings.

ASCP. 82000 - Ralph Ellison: An American Literary Enigma GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Watts, [22253] Cross listed with ENGL 75600

The acclaim which accompanied the 1952 publication of Ellison’s first novel, Invisible Man heralded the appearance of a major literary talent who would undoubtedly influence American letters for decades to come.  Awarded the National Book Award for fiction, Ellison would spend the next fifty years trying unsuccessfully to complete a second novel.  In fact, when Ellison died, it was discovered that the manuscripts he left behind were not close to constituting a completed second novel.  Years after his death, scholars still cannot definitively explain why Ellison was unable to finish this work.  Some believe that he suffocated under the burden of living to see his first novel declared a “classic.”  They hypothesized that Ellison despaired about the second novel believing that it was not reaching the heights of Invisible Man. Perhaps Ellison also recognized that many Afro-American intellectuals were devastated by his inability to complete this second novel because they had created Ellison as the standard bearer of black artistic excellence. Ironically, Ellison was no small contributor to that image of himself for he constantly celebrated himself as a unique American writer.  Ellison did manage to publish two well received collections of non-fiction essays.  One collection, Shadow and Act, became a highly influential discussion of Afro-American/American culture. 
In this seminar, I hope to situate Ellison the man and Ellison the literary symbol in their various intellectual contexts. We will read Invisible Man, his two non-fiction essay collections (Going to the Territory and Shadow and Act) and the unfinished second novel, Juneteenth, which was put together by Ellison’s literary executor and published after Ellison’s death.  We will also read criticism of Ellison’s fiction and discussions of his theories of Afro-American culture.

ASCP. 82000 - Re-visiting the Black Atlantic  GC:  T, 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bennett, [22268] Course open to doctoral students only, Cross listed with IDS 81660

Twenty years after the publication of Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness (Harvard: Harvard University Press, 1993) American scholarship no longer simply posits the relationship between blackness and modernity as an irreconcilable problem. Though Gilroy posited The Black Atlantic as a ‘heuristic’ work, the ideas associated with the book engendered scholarly inquiry into disparate sites of knowledge production, most notably history, anthropology, and literary studies but also in fields (philosophy and political thought) once perceived as the exclusive domain of an organic and hermetically sealed Western tradition. By insisting that blackness figures as a constitutive element of modernity, Gilroy effected a lasting transformation in knowledge production. He, of course, built on the black radical tradition that included the enslaved and free blacks, Abolitionists and Nationalists along with W.E.B. Dubois, Claudia Jones, and C.L.R. James. But Gilroy’s insistence on framing black writings as thought and seeing the experiences of blacks as a social phenomenon with powerful consequences for the history of modernity re-configured the scholarly agenda on various disciplinary fonts. As part of a Graduate Center initiative, The Black Atlantic @ Twenty, and in collaboration with New York University, “Re-visiting the Black Atlantic: Knowledge, Disciplinarity & Diasporic Formations” Professors Bennett (GC, History) and Morgan (NYU, Social & Cultural Analysis and History) will offer a seminar that examines how Gilroy work has influenced scholars to re-configure their theorization of the past and the writing of history. For this reason, the course is not strictly configured as an exercise in historiography—the effort to historicize scholarly writings on a particular theme or event in the past. Even as this course analyzes selective historiographies related to slavery, race making, and freedom, our attention will always be directed at the ways that scholars since Gilroy’s intervention have approached these aforementioned themes in relation to the narrative of modernity. Stated differently, how have writers related experiences of violence, difference, and an emergent liberty to modernity prior to and in the aftermath of The Black Atlantic’s appearance? In preparation for the seminar, the participants are asked to read Cedric J. Robinson, Black Marxism: The Making of the Black Radical Tradition (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2000 [1983]). Finally, participants should know that the seminar meetings will alternate between the Graduate Center and New York University. The first meeting will be held on the NYU campus (20 Cooper Square, Room 471, the Department of Social Cultural Analysis) on September 3, 2013.

ASCP. 82000 - Specters of the Black Atlantic: Reconsidering Race and Freedom in the Circum-Atlantic World 1789-1859    GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Faherty, [22256] Cross Listed with ENGL 85000 

In the twenty years since its landmark publication, Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness (1993) has dramatically reshaped the ways in which we understand the political and social geographies of race and diaspora. Gilroy’s pathbreaking volume demonstrated the limitations of “nationalist paradigms” to account for the “transcultural and transnational” dimensions of modernity, and in this course we will attempt to trace the routes of such cultural practices across the first half of what Ian Baucom calls “the long twentieth century.” As Jeannie Marie Delombard has very recently argued Gilroy’s geographical reorientation of the African diaspora “had the unexpected effect of promoting a corresponding (if less celebrated) chronological recalibration” of the field. In particular, this  critical turn has reinvigorated the study of eighteenth and early nineteenth century circum-Atlantic cultural production by expanding our operant sense of its canonical dimensions. As such, John Marrant, Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Ignatius Sancho, and Venture Smith are often embraced as important early pivots in Black Atlantic cultural production even if, unlike Phillis Wheatley or Jupiter Hammon, they do not have roots within an “American” literary tradition or provide testimony about their enslavement in North America. By placing Gilroy’s framework in conversation with the work of C.L.R. James, Ian Baucom, Avery Gordon, Stephanie Smallwood, Fred Moten, Ivy Wilson, Joseph Roach, Elizabeth Maddock Dillon, Kenneth Warren, and others, this course aims to explore the ways in which an “Africanist” presence shaped the formation of the circum-Atlantic world. In so doing, we will consider the ways in which issues of race, freedom, unfreedom, and personal sovereignty were the fundamental concerns of the age of revolutions (even when texts are seemingly silent about racial categories). In essence, we will sound out the contours of how the themes of freedom and individualism which have been proffered as the emblematic themes of “American literature” are in fact dependent on a manifestly unfree black population. In so doing, we will also explore the ways in which a wide range of writers responded to these concepts of unfreedom, diaspora, revolution, and hybrity. Following the work of Laurent Dubois, Ashley White, and Michel-Rolph Trouillot, we will also place a particular emphasis on the impact of the Haitian Revolution on the formation of the nascent U.S Republic, even as we consider the root causes for the longstanding silencing of the complexities of the past. In addition to our critical readings, we will also examine a variety of texts from the long eighteenth century including works by: Venture Smith, Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Phillis Wheatley, Jupiter Hammon, Charles Brockden Brown, Leonora Sansay, David Walker, Herman Melville, Edgar Allan Poe, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Harriet Jacobs, and Martin Delany. Requirements for the course include class participation, an oral report, and a seminar-length paper. NB: Students should read Toni Morrison’s A Mercy (2008) in preparation for the first class session.
 
ASCP. 82000 - Sociology of Education   GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Attewell, [22294] Cross listed with SOC 84503  

This course focuses on education and its relationship to social inequality, taking a longitudinal perspective; that is, looking at the sequence of educational experiences from pre-school, elementary and high school, through college. Our emphasis will be on events that tend to create and/or diminish inequalities in learning, educational attainments, and life outcomes such as earnings and other material results.
Also we shall consider major sources of data for research at different levels of education (NELS, NAEP, etc); how to access these public data sources, and what skills are required to use them will be discussed.

Requirements for the course consist of (1) weekly readings together with a short (around 1 page) paper to be submitted each week, and (2) a term paper that should be around 20 pages long. A one page description of your proposed topic for this term paper should be submitted by the fourth week of class, so that the instructors can review it and make suggestions. Note also that the last three class sessions will be devoted to student presentations of your term papers. The idea is that this will provide an opportunity for comments that may improve the quality of your paper.

Required readings for the course will be accessible.

ASCP. 82000 - The Civil War  GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Oakes, [22263] Cross listed with HIST 75200

This course will introduce students to the major issues—social, political, economic, and military--related to the origins and prosecution of the Civil War. Readings will consist of classic debates as well as some of the latest monographs. Grades will be based on three short papers as well as participation in weekly discussions.
NOTE: In preparation for the class, as essential background, students should already have read James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom.
 
ASCP. 82000 - Twentieth Century Political Thought  GC:  W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Jacobs, [22274] Cross listed with P Sc 70300

This course is intended to introduce some of the key figures contributing to political theory during the last century, and to assess the relevance of their work for our own day. The development of Marxist, psychoanalytic, and of liberal ideas -- and the ways in which these streams of thought interacted and responded to one another -- will be particularly accented. We will engage in sustained debates as to the meanings of power, human nature, the obligations owed by humans to society (and by society to humans) and will also explore the extent to which the work of relevant thinkers can be clarified by discussion of the contexts in which these writers lived. Readings are likely to include pieces by Freud, Weber, Lenin, Lukacs, Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Habermas, Arendt, Strauss, Fanon, Foucault, Rawls, Nozick, and Sandel. The course will be of interest, and accessible, not only to those who are planning to take a comprehensive exam in Political Theory, but also to those in any number of other programs.

ASCP. 82000 - Youth Cultures in the Americas GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Ramos-Zayas, [22366] Cross listed with ANTH 72000.

 
See Also:

EES. 79903 - Glbl Hazards/Environ Resources   C:   T/R, 9:00-10:15 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Padilla, [22036] Section open to Ph.D. EES students only.                                    

EES. 79903 - Global Feminisms    GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Oza, [22030] Section open to Ph.D. EES students only. Cross listed with WSCP 81000.             

EES. 79903 - Immigration/Migration/Justice    JJ:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Varsanyi, [22031] Section open to Ph.D. EES students only. Cross listed with CRJ 87300.         

EES. 79903 - Introduction to Housing   H:   W, 5:35-7:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Angotti, [22032] Section open to Ph.D. EES students only.                                       

EES. 79903 - Space & Cultural Theory  GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Low, [22028] Section open to Ph.D. EES students only. Cross listed with ANTH 71800 & SYC 80103.

 
 
 



___________________________________________________________

SPRING 2013


ASCP. 81000 - Introduction to American Studies: Histories & Methods
GC: W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Reid-Pharr, [20102] Cross listed with MALS 73100.

What is the object of American studies?” “What does ‘American studies’ study, and what does it want?” The object of this course is to explore these questions by considering the histories, theories, and practices of the interdisciplinary field of American studies, from its inception as an academic discipline to its present “state of emergency.”

We will consider how American studies has been transformed from a movement into an institution represented by one of the largest and most widely recognized annual academic conferences in the United States.

Generally organized as a program and not a department, it resides somewhere between (or, perhaps, outside) normative disciplinary boundaries and in sometimes productive, sometimes uneasy relations to the other “studies” which have been created in part on its model.

During this semester we will consider the complexity inherent in this model, as we trace the influence of both seminal and emerging work in American studies. We will also consider the different meanings that American studies has (and has had) for different disciplines, and attempt to take stock of its current position in the academy and in our own work.

ASCP. 81500 - Proseminar in American Studies
GC: F, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Chuh, [20103] Cross listed witth MALS 73200.

This course is designed to accomplish three goals: 1) to offer practical research training to student scholars for whom a primary field of engagement is American studies; 2) to deepen understanding of the key questions in contemporary Americanist discourses; and 3) to provide a structured forum for participants to develop and workshop essays for publication consideration in a peer reviewed journal or equivalent venue in the field.
 
To accomplish these goals, participants will engage in such questions as, what is a research question? What are exigency and methodology? How does one embed her- or himself into a field? What do disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity mean theoretically as well as practically?

In addition to participants’ essays, the texts for the course will include examples of recently published articles and chapters; calls for papers for journals and editions; and the readings for the public seminars offered by the Revolutionizing American Studies initiative, which participants are expected to attend as part of the work of this course.
 
Much of the workshopping will be accomplished by using the Academic Commons resources. Participants should establish an Academic Commons account if they have not yet done so. 

For the first class meeting (1 Feb), students should prepare a 1-page description of their respective projects for the semester, which should include primary field(s) of engagement and target publication venue(s).

Students interested in registering in this course should contact Kandice Chuh at kchuh@gc.cuny.edu with a brief description of the specific project she or he has in hand and plans to develop during the semester.

ASCP. 81500 - History & Politics of Time
GC: R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wilder, [20910] Cross listed with ANTH 81500.

ASCP. 81500 - Indigenity & its Discontents--CANCELLED
GC: F, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Dombrowski, [20911] Cross listed with ANTH 81900.


ASCP. 81500 - Anthropology and History
GC: W, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Skurski, [20912] Cross listed with ANTH 82000.


This seminar explores the mutual engagement of anthropology and history, and challenges the assumptions that have defined disciplinary boundaries over time. We will examine the genealogies and topics that have shaped the development of historical anthropology and anthropologically informed history, with a focus on categories of analysis, conceptual frameworks, and modes of presentation.

In this seminar we will discuss innovative monographs and articles that map critical engagements and exemplify transdisciplinary work.

Students will write commentaries on the readings, a review essay, and a final paper.

ASCP. 81500 - American Jewish History
GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kessner, [20877] Cross listed with HIST 74900 & MALS 76200.


For those who would understand the history of the United States and its diverse people the history of the Jews in the US is significant; for those who would understand Jewish history, the role of the Jewish community in the United States is crucial.

Less than one hundred years ago many would have questioned this latter statement. After all, the important centers of world Jewry were located across the Atlantic and much that was important in Jewish life transpired there. But troubles and tragedies triggered a series of migrations that brought millions of Jews to the U.S. and today the U.S. has the largest Jewish population in the world.

We will be investigating some of the uprooting forces that accounted for the waves of Jewish immigration. They came (especially in the period 1880-1920) in the millions, and confronted many of the conventional immigrant challenges; and others that were quite unique.

In time this previously marginal population formed an influential minority populating America’s large cities and lending their institutions a piquant cultural tone.

It is of course too simple to speak of a single American Jewish community or culture for they came from many places with a variety of backgrounds. Is there a center that held these disparate historical elements together? Can America’s Jews legitimately be described as a community? Do they share values and outlooks? Are they defined by religion or culture or social relationships, or is there something else, perhaps external, that is even more important?

What was the process of their Americanization? What were the forces – economic, political, social, cultural and religious- that shaped their experience here?

Moreover, it was far from a passive experience. Jews had a large, perhaps disproportionate, impact on the American nation and we will seek to study that impact on society, thought, culture and politics.

And what of Judaism? How did it fare in the free, largely Protestant atmosphere of the US? We will discuss the rise of Reform and Conservatism and the resurgence of a diverse American Orthodoxy. We will also look at other themes, both benign and cataclysmic: Zionism, Socialist thought, the Holocaust, Israel.

Over the past thirty years a generation of freshly conceived studies about American Jewish life have given this field a vigor and standing that it had not attained before. Historians of the American Jewish experience have fashioned a rigorous body of systematic work that is informed by theory and broad questions. They have crafted a textured complex past from the lives of immigrants, artists, political ideologues and religious thinkers; from philanthropists, workers, women, and idealists.

Many of these imaginative and at times provocative monographs have tended to isolate their topics, viewing them narrowly to create a field of brilliant fragments. Our challenge will be to bring these important segments together to shape an understanding of American Jewish history.

Course learning objectives:

Over the course of the semester students will be expected to demonstrate:
• An understanding of key texts in American Jewish History
• An understanding of the role of politics, economics, social forces, culture and technology in shaping American Jewish life
• Knowledge of the American Jewish experience and an appreciation for its complexity
• An understanding of the role of America’s Jewish population on the larger historical forces of the nation
• An understanding of the role of the American Jewish community on the larger world Jewish community.
• An ability lead a class discussion on a topic in American Jewish history.
• An ability to critically review and analyze historical studies
• Achieve a familiarity with important research resources including archives, web sources, and source collections in the field
• An ability to write a well defined, carefully researched and cogently argued research paper in the field of American Jewish history

Collateral Assignments:

The assignments in this course are designed to train students for research, writing and teaching.

Reading, leading class discussions and participating in them are integral to successfully completing the work for this class. Each session will have a discussion leader who will prepare a short synopsis of the reading to be e-mailed in advance of class and lead a discussion on the reading. A second reader will offer a critique of the reading based on the review literature and the student’s own evaluation. There are several additional assignments.

In addition other assignments will include:

Review of a recent book on American Jewish history.
Brief paper on the history of a neighborhood or a community organization

Research paper or historiographic essay on an approved topic.

ASCP. 81500 - Authentication & Novelization in 19th-Century American Writing
GC: T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Hoeller, [20874] Cross listed with ENGL 75500 & WSCP 81000.

William Andrews notes in his essay “The Novelization of Voice in Early African American Narrative" that the most "radical vocal experiment in nineteenth-century black American writing [was] that which introduced the fictive voice into the tradition of African-American narrative."

This course will look at the complicated tensions between truth claims, credibility, and the use of a “fictive voice” in the works of African-American writers such as Williams Wells Brown, Hannah Crafts, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Harriet Wilson, as well as white writers such as Martha Griffith Browne (who authored the fake Autobiography of a Female Slave), Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Theodore Dwight Weld (who compiled Slavery As It Is) in order to explore authenticating and novelizing strategies in their narratives.

How did African-American writers negotiate the boundaries between truth and fiction and what were the payoffs and stakes of moving from the slave narrative into fiction or using fictional devices within the genre of the slave narrative? And how did white writers such as Martha Griffith Browne, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Herman Melville negotiate their fictions’ relation to truth and rely on authenticating moves?

Our discussion will include critical readings surrounding these questions and their literary, cultural, and political contexts—which made them both urgent and complicated--, as well as, whenever possible, multiple texts by one writer such as, for example, the three autobiographies of Frederick Douglass and his fictional piece “The Heroic Slave,” Williams Wells Brown’s 1847 slave narrative and his novel Clotel, and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin and the Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

ASCP. 81500 - Black Visual Culture
GC: R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wallace, [20875] Cross listed with ENGL 85500 & WSCP 81000.

The field of visual culture, which encompasses but is not limited to traditions of art history, has become increasingly central in a digital age in which the inventory of available images from the past continues to expand via the many museums and archives online, as well as the many artist’s websites.
 

Black visual culture, as I am defining it, takes up related topics in the context of racial images, which are drawn from visual art history, and the history of human display, as well as stereotypes from the mythological to the forensic (i.e. The Venus Hottentot).

It would be impossible in the space of a single semester to do justice to the potential of such a field. Alternatively, I have constructed herein for our perusal a sampler composed of the following segments:
 

1. European and American Art:
17th through 19th century,
taken from The Image of the Black in Western Art (Harvard UP and Belknap)
The magi in the Renaissance;
Abolitionist images in the 18th and 19th century.

2. African American Art: 20th Century
Jacob Lawrence’s The Photographer (1942),
Romare Bearden’s The Block (1971)
Faith Ringgold, Street Story Quilt {1985),
“Modern Storytellers: Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence and Faith Ringgold”
Metropolitan Museum of Art Website
The Jacob Lawrence and Gwen Knight Virtual Resource Center
 

3. Photography: 20th Century
Frances Benjamin Johnston’s Hampton Album,
Johnston (Frances Benjamin) Collection, Library of Congress
WEB DuBois, Negro Exhibit at the 1900 Paris Exposition
“African American Photographs Assembled for 1900 Paris Exposition”
Library of Congress and the NAACP’s The Crisis,
“The Modernist Journals Project: The Crisis 1910-1922” Brown University & The University of Tulsa Collection
James VanDerZee and black portraiture,
Gordon Parks and FSA Photography, Library of Congress
Contemporary Afro-American Women Photographers:
Carrie Mae Weems
Lorna Simpson
Renee Cox

ASCP. 81500 - Core Seminar in Politcal Science
GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. O'Brien, [20881] Cross listed with P SC 71000 & WSCP 81000.

All incoming students pursuing a Ph.D. or an M.A. in political science are strongly encouraged to take this seminar for the purpose of knitting us all into a lifelong community or collectivity of intellectuals who are passionate about politics.

Every student in political science studies some aspect of power. They examine power in abstraction (political theory), or power from the perspective of our nation-state (American politics), among foreign nation-states (comparative politics), or between nation-states (international relations).

As a global hegemon, the United States also exerts formal and informal influence, manifested formally as American foreign policy or informally as American cultural or economic hegemony (American Studies, Women’s & Gender Studies).

This seminar explores theoretical questions associated with culture and resistance, particularly involving political identity, and inciting American or global social movements that protect vulnerable populations.

Finally, it refers to the American exportation of the rule of law in terms of the Americanization of Europe (neo-classical capitalism, neo-liberalism, new empires, fundamentalism) or the European Union (EU), as well as the exportation of the Anglo-Saxon and Enlightenment culture(s) of civil rights, civil liberties, and human rights, manifested in the Yoo brief, the Gitmo Supreme Court cases, and the Veil controversy, and the use of Shari’a tribunals at home and abroad.

(1-credit tutorials also available with my permission & EO permission.)

ASCP. 81500 - Introduction to Disability Studies in the Humanities
GC: R, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Rm. 3491, 3 credits, Prof. Straus, [20880] Permission of instructor required. Cross listed with MUS 84000 & IDS 81670.

An introduction to the emerging, interdisciplinary field of Disability Studies in the Humanities. Topics will include “Nineteenth-Century Networks of Care,” “Narratives of Disability,” “Intellectual Disability,” Performing Disability,” “Disability and Sexuality,” “Autism as Disability Culture,” “‘Mental Illness’ and Post-Psychiatry,” and “The Work of Disability Memoir.” Guest lecturers include CUNY faculty (Sarah Chinn and Talia Schafer) and three of the leading figures in Disability Studies (Lennard Davis, Rachel Adams, and Thomas Couser). The topics, instructors, and students in this course will represent a variety of fields within the humanities. Enrollment by permission of the instructor: jstraus@gc.cuny.edu.

ASCP. 81500 - Fabric of Cultures: NY Fashion
GC: R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Paulicelli, [20872] Cross listed with ART 80010, IDS 82300, MALS 72100 & WSCP 81000.

The seminar will focus on New York and the birth of American fashion, covering a time span from the sweatshops of the second half of the nineteenth century where Jewish and Italian immigrants worked, to the gilded age, department stores, the emergence of the ―American Look‖ in the 1930s and 1940s, on to the subsequent shifts that occurred in the 1960s, up until the present of the New York Fashion week and New York as a global fashion capital.

We will focus on the major role played by women who have worked in the industry as designers, stylists, and journalists (such as the New York-based Claire McCardell, Elizabeth Hawes, Diana Vreeland, Jo Copeland and others).

We will go on to examine the New York socio-cultural context out of which these women emerged, the relationship the city has with fashion and modernity, with fashion‘s role as a creator of national and local identity, and image.

Fashion in New York will be studied as an industry, an economic force, a phenomenon that creates and performs identities and fosters interplay between gender, the body and sexuality. Particular attention will be given to those periods of great transformation in the history of the city when fashion played an important role in shaping the city‘s culture and identity, and had an impact on lifestyles and gender perception in the workplace and in other social and private spaces.

Visits to museums and archives will be scheduled during the semester to complement the topics covered in class. Readings will be drawn from theoretical and historical texts as well as novels, magazine articles, memoirs and films.

Authors will include W. Benjamin, R. Barthes, D. Harvey, S. Buck-Morss, N. Rantisi, C. Millbank, V. Steele, N. Green, P. Stallybrass, D. Soyer, D. Gilbert, C. Breward, Rebecca Arnold, Edith Wharton, Lois Gould (a memoir about her mother, the fashion designer Jo Copeland,) short films by D.W. Griffith on fashion, consumption, modernity, documentaries on the garment district, Bill Cunningham and others.

Students will be encouraged to conduct original research and use the museum and clothing archives in the city as well as the libraries for their final project.

ASCP. 81500 - Gender and Globalization
GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Eisenstein, [20886] Cross listed with SOC 86800 & WSCP 81000.

In this course we will examine the relationship between the phenomenon now widely termed “globalization,” and the changes in gender relations that have taken place since the rise of the second wave of the women’s movement in the 1960s.

Since the end of the “long boom” (starting after World War II and lasting through the mid-1970s), academic and mainstream feminism have enjoyed enormous success, during a period of economic, social, and political restructuring that has created an intensified polarization between rich and poor, and an ever-growing mass of desperately impoverished people around the globe. This course will examine this paradox.

We will seek to define globalization, starting from the premise that this is a stage in the development of the international capitalist system, under the economic and military domination of the world’s only remaining superpower. More specifically, we will look at the “Washington consensus,” under which developing countries have been forced to open their borders to the free flow of capital from the rich countries. Among other changes, “globalization” involves the intensive use of female labor, from maquiladoras to electronics factories to textile factories. It has also produced an acceleration of “informal” work for women.

While educated women can now walk through many doors previously closed to them, in the worlds of business, sports, and politics, the majority of women in the world are increasingly impoverished, overworked and exploited, and subject to a wide variety of forms of violence, sexual, military, and economic. The majority of the world’s refugees are now women and children.

We will address these issues by posing a number of questions. Where does the ideology of globalization come from? How has globalization affected the conditions of women and children in the developed and the developing world? How has contemporary feminism been shaped by the workforce participation of women? What is the role of class and race in the women’s movement, domestically and internationally? Why are issues of gender, sexuality, and race so central to the culture wars being waged at home and abroad by religious fundamentalist leaders? How does the association of “liberated women” with modernity affect the process of globalization? In the revived social movement that has placed the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other international financial institutions at the center of an intensified campaign for social justice, what is the place for organized women’s activism?

Readings in the course are selected from theoretical writings as well as case studies, and students are encouraged to develop their own research and activist agendas.

ASCP. 81500 - Gender & Sexuality in the 20th-Century U.S.
GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Hurewitz, [20878] Cross listed with HIST 75700 & WSCP 81000.

This class is an opportunity to discuss recent work in the history of gender and sexuality in the U.S. As a field, this is a wide and still expanding area of historical research, including studies in women's history, gay history, histories of sexual behavior, abortion, masculinity, femininity, dating, marriage, transgender identity, and more.

Additionally, historians have been approaching this already wide array of topics from a mix of cultural, social, and political perspectives. As a result, there is a lot of interesting work for us to investigate.

We'll focus in on a different book each week to get a sense of how this field has emerged and is continuing to grow. The sequence of books is roughly chronological, starting from the late 19th century and going to the late 20th century.

My hope is that, in addition to learning about the field, we'll also be developing some narratives about how ideas about gender and sexuality changed over the last century or so.


ASCP. 81500 - Genealogies of Magical Realism in the Americas
GC: W, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Di Iorio, [20876] Cross listed with ENGL 86500.


This class will study the literary mode of magical realist fiction in which "irreducible elements" of magic are included in otherwise realistic narratives. Mainstream readers, and even literary critics, tend to identify magical realism solely with Latin American literature, but other readers and critics have acknowledged that magical realism is one of the main trends in contemporary world literature.

We will examine early precursors, and definitions, of magical realism, as well as some of its most famous examples. The famous Latin American models created space for, or gave a voice to, those who found themselves on the margins of power. We will test whether this is also the case in the more recent magical realist examples in fiction by global writers who are not Latin American, U.S. minority writers, and women writers.

As well, we will examine magical realism in relation to literary theory, particularly noting how magical realism is a mode that often interrogates, and enables an accounting of, personal and historical trauma.

Some texts we will read: The Kingdom of This World by Alejo Carpentier, One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez, Red Sorghum by Mo Yan, American Gods by Neil Gaiman, Magical Realist Fiction: An Anthology, edited by Young and Hollaman, and other texts.

Last but not least, while I continue to compile the reading list over the next month, I am open to any suggestions you might have about additional texts.

ASCP. 81500 - NYCDOE After Mayor Bloomberg
GC: T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bloomfield, [20890] Cross listed with U ED 75200.

Based on course readings and presentations by policy actors, students will research strengths and weaknesses in the vision, structures, and programs of the DOE under Mayor Bloomberg in order to formulate legal and policy recommendations for the next Mayor and the Legislature.

Particular issues to be addressed include governance/operational structures such as the roles of the PEP, support networks, and partnership organizations; accountability based on school and teacher evaluation systems; strategies to improve student performance and close achievement gaps; and school choice.

Course outcomes include a Workshop Monograph by students aimed at educators, politicians, policy makers, and the broader community and, perhaps, participation in course-related academic conference.

ASCP. 81500 - Party Polarization in American Politics
GC: T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Jones, [20882] Cross listed with P SC 72001.

Has the American public become more polarized? What about political elites running in elections and serving in government? Is there any connection between mass and elite polarization? Why does polarization seem to be taking place, and what are its consequences?

This class will delve deeply into all of these questions. We will begin by taking a historical perspective and asking whether current levels of polarization within the U.S. government are unusually high, or whether the seemingly low levels from a half century ago were the real aberration. We will explore several different explanations for why the parties in government have become more divided from each other over the past 50 years or so, including both constituency-based explanations as well as institutional ones.

After that, we will shift our attention to the mass public. We’ll examine evidence both for and against the notion that the American public is currently polarized, and try to document and explain the specific ways in which the American public has—and has not—become more polarized over time (e.g., culturally, economically, geographically).

Finally, we will analyze the consequences of elite and mass polarization—for public policy, for representation, and for public’s attitudes towards politics and government.

Many of the readings in the class will be drawn from the American politics reading list – integrating both American institutions and processes.

ASCP. 81500 - Popular Music in Cross-Cultural Perspectives
GC: M, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Rm. 3389, 3 credits, Prof. Manuel, [20879] Cross listed with MUS 83000.

This course combines conceptual and analytic approaches to the study of popular music with explorations of diverse selected genres, emphasizing music cultures outside the Euro-American mainstream and distinct from those (such as Hispanic Caribbean music) that are covered in other seminars. While not attempting to provide a comprehensive survey of world popular musics, the course also aims to generate some familiarity with a representative spectrum of non-Euro-American genres diverse in style, historical era, and locale. We are interested both in socio-musical aspects as well as formal analytical approaches to the music genres studied.

Thematic focuses include: Frankfurt School critiques in global perspectives, gender issues, urbanization, music and socio-political movements, media studies perspectives, globalization and diasporic dynamics, and the power dynamics of musical interactions between the West and “the rest.” Music cultures covered will include Africa, the Middle East, Greece, India, East and Southeast Asia, Mexico, and South America.

A term paper and one or two short written assignments will be required.

ASCP. 81500 - Race and Ethnicity
GC: W, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kasinitz, [20888] Cross listed with SOC 85800.

Race and ethnicity are constantly changing and evolving, yet they remain among the most persistent forms of structured social inequality. Focusing on the United States, but with reference to other multi-ethnic societies, we will examine the evolution of the concept of “race” and its relationship to racism; the heritage of slavery and segregation and their impacts contemporary life; the origins of modern racism and anti-Semitism, “scientific racism, ” why and how the salience of ethnic identity increases and decreases at particular historical moments, the relationship of race and ethnicity to migration, nationalism, colonialism and class, the growth of the Latino and Asian American populations and what that means for American notions of race, etc.

In addition we will take an in depth look at how racial boundaries change, competition and cooperation between ethnic groups in contemporary America and how “racialized” minorities are (or are not) incorporated into different societies.

Readings will include works by W.E.B. Dubois; Jean Paul Sartre, George Fredrickson; William Julius Wilson, David Roediger, John Iceland, Richard Alba, Tariq Madood, Alejandro Portes, Stephen Steinberg and Mary Waters.

ASCP. 81500 - Socially Engaged Art/Political Economy
GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Sholette, [20873] Permission of instructor required. Cross listed with ART 86040.

Art is big business: a few artists command huge sums of money, the vast majority are ignored; yet these marginalized artists remain essential to the mainstream cultural economy serving as its missing creative mass. At the same time, a rising sense of oppositional agency is developing within these invisible folds of cultural productivity.

Selectively surveying structures of visibility and invisibility, resentment and resistance, this seminar will focus on the present and past state of the archive made up of alternative hybrid cooperative networks, systems of artistic gift exchange, tactical media , and community based public art.

Participants will research such artists‘ groups as Pussy Riot, Viona, W.A.G.E., W.H.W., The Yes Men, Temporary Services, Group Material, PAD/D, while reading historical and theoretical texts by Adorno, Brecht, Bishop, Bourdieu, Debord, Lippard, Mouff, Enwezor, Steyerl, Kester, and others. Auditors by permission.

Requirements: Students will give oral presentations followed by a research paper.
Preliminary Readings:

Theodor W. Adorno: "Black as an Ideal" (1970) and "Commitment" (1962)

Media Lecture by Greg Sholette: "Are you talking to me? Interventionist art in the age of enterprise culture" (20 minutes) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtBxU36Uw3o Additional readings for this class can be found at: http://www.darkmatterarchives.net/?page_id=252

ASCP. 81500 - Social Movements in the US  
GC: R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Fox Piven, [20883] Cross listed with P SC 72410, SOC 86400 & WSCP 81000.

This course has three main parts. We will begin with an examination of the major theories that purport to explain social movements, including the conditions that give rise to the movement, the forms movement action takes, and the consequences. In particular we will be searching in this literature for the understandings of power implicit or explicit in the theory. I will suggest that the literature neglects the question of power from below, and suggest some directions for inquiry into the admittedly infrequent occasions when power is exercised from below.

The second and third parts of the course are historical and empirical. We will look at the history of social protest movements in the United States, from the mobs of the revolutionary war era, and including the abolitionists, the populists, the labor movement, civil rights, and the LBGT movements. Finally, we will (as best we can given that the literature on recent events is somewhat sparse) look at contemporary movements, including the global justice, environmental, and Occupy movements, as well as anti-austerity protests, and try to glean insights into the conditions that give rise to these movements, and the factors that account for responses to them.

ASCP. 81500 - Sociology of Medicine
GC: W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Pitts-Taylor, [20885] Cross listed with SOC 77800 & WSCP 81000.

This course will address the sociology of medicine from a range of critical perspectives and theoretical vantage points, including social constructionism, actor network theory, the governmentality literature, feminism, queer theory, critical race studies, neomaterialism, and critical disability studies.

We will examine current manifestations of medicalization, health and illness, and biosociality as social products of the neoliberal context, and pursue both illness and disability as sites of social struggle. We will consider the promise and limits of social constructionism in understanding the sick body and the disabled subject; we will address the medicalization of physical and cognitive impairments as well as trends in psychiatry; we will look at the emerging transnational trade in organs, cell lines, and bioinformatics and consider how sociological frameworks can contributing to understanding these

ASCP. 81500 - The Body in Performance
GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Powers, [20889] Cross listed with THEA 85400.

Exploring the tension between the study of drama as literature versus its study as performance, this course examines the role of performing bodies as critical signifiers and makers of meaning.

We will discuss the difference between the linguistic and corporeal trajectories of performance theory and focus on concepts such as "corporeality", the embodied social codes as exhibited in relation to theatrical space, performance style, costume, properties, gesture, etc.

How do such corporeal components work symbiotically to create an embodied discourse? What are the techniques by which theater historians can interpret this discourse? How might this discourse challenge or reinforce social norms? In the study of historical dramas, how can we reconstruct such absent corporeal aspects from the available historical sources? What problems arise in doing so?

Mindful of such questions surrounding the study of performance, we will read critical works such as those of Michel Foucault, Michel de Certeau, Marcel Mauss, Susan Leigh Foster, Cynthia Novack, Joseph Roach, and Diana Taylor, while we examine performance style and artists such as contact improvisation, Takarazuka, Grotowski, Terzopoulos, and Carmelita Tropicana.

In the process, we will consider the ways in which both a production’s historical context and the performance context of the theater (e.g. theatrical space, costume and properties, audience) both influence and are influenced by performing bodies.

Course requirements include weekly discussion questions, an in-class presentation, and 15 – 20 page research paper.

ASCP. 81500 - Youth/Marginalzation/Subculture/Resistance
GC: T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Brotherton, [20887] Cross listed with SOC 85000.

ASCP 81500 - Digital Humanities: Methods & Practices GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Dwyer, [20988] Cross listed with MALS. 75500

This is a hands-on course in doing Digital Humanities. Its practice generally entails four main stages: data capture, annotation, exploration and analysis, and dissemination. Workshops surveying the tools, methods, and standards entailed in these stages are a regular part of the weekly class. In addition to training in these skills, the course will explore the profound cultural changes that the practice of digital humanities instantiates and reflects. First, the tools and data we choose shape the research questions we ask. Second, the digital humanities generally aim to create community resources, going beyond the work of the individual. Students will be assessed on their applying this new approach to scholarship and information to a project of their choice. The course has no prerequisites, and welcomes students from all humanities and social-science disciplines.

ASCP. 82000 - '60's NYC Community Cultural Education
GC: R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Brier, [20908] Cross listed with U ED 71200.

This research seminar focuses on the historic struggles over community control of education that wracked New York City neighborhoods and schools during the “long decade” of the 1960s. The seminar will start with the failed efforts by parents and activists to integrate the NYC public school system beginning in the late 1950s and extending through the mid-1960s, then focus closely on the epochal 1968 UFT strike against community control of the public schools that shutdown the entire school system in the fall of that year, and finally look at the battles in the City University beginning in the late 1960s to open admissions to a broader, more representative cross section of the city’s public school graduates.

Seminar participants, who will hopefully be drawn from a range of social science disciplines and from the MALS program, will begin by doing close reading of extant secondary analyses of these historical events.

We will then immerse ourselves in primary source materials, including contemporary reportage, oral interviews (some of which we will conduct ourselves), governmental and agency reports and data, as well as cultural and visual sources, to develop a broad understanding of what happened during the critical long decade of the 1960s and the implications for understanding the current status of NYC’s educational institutions.

Students will be expected to develop single-authored or collaborative research projects on a historical subject of particular interest to them, resulting in research papers and/or multimedia presentations that can and should be publishable.

Emphasis will be placed on learning how to “read,” evaluate and contextualize historical documents and sources.

ASCP. 82000 - Musical Relations between African-Americans & European-American in US, 1865-1965
GC: M, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Rm. 3491, 3 credits, Prof. Blum, [20899] Open to doctoral students only; not open to auditors. Cross listed with MUS 83400.

The seminar interrogates prominent (and less prominent) interpretations of the musical relations between African Americans and European Americans in the first century after the Civil War. The “interrogation” is “enhanced” through analysis of both the theoretical presuppositions and the practical consequences of the various approaches. The seminar in not intended as a chronological survey, and some familiarity with the music history of the U.S. in this period is highly desirable. The workload includes weekly reading and listening assignments (to be discussed in class by each participant), small exercises, and a final paper on an approved topic.

Open only to doctoral students (in any program). Not open to auditors.

ASCP. 82000 - African-American Fiction Since the 1970's
GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Webb, [20895] Cross listed with ENGL 75600, AFCP 73100, MALS 73500, & WSCP 81000.

A study of the poetics and politics of postmodernism in the fiction of African American writers since the 1970s. Although the last three decades of the twentieth century were undoubtedly the most productive and innovative period in the development of African American literature and literary criticism, it was also a period of extreme social and cultural fragmentation in African American communities.

In this course we will examine how African American writers have addressed the problems of literary representation when faced with increased commodification of culture and knowledge, the proliferation of new forms of literacy and orality, and the breakdown of traditional forms of community. Our readings will also include some selections not usually considered postmodernist but that address similar concerns about identity, culture, writing and possibilities for social change.

We will read selected essays by theorists of postmodernism such as Hutcheon, Jameson, Harvey and Bhabha as well as essays by literary critics and cultural theorists who have been involved in ongoing discussions about the relevance of postmodernism for African Americans at the turn of the 21st century such as bell hooks, Cornel West, W. Lawrence Hogue, Wahneema Lubiano, and Madhu Dubey.

Requirements: Oral presentations and a term paper (15-20 pages). The course will be conducted as a seminar with class discussions of assigned readings and oral presentations each week.

Texts: Ishmael Reed, Mumbo Jumbo; Clarence Major, My Amputations; Toni Cade Bambara, The Salt Eaters; John Edgar Wideman, Sent for You Yesterday; Charles Johnson, Middle Passage; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Gayle Jones, The Healing; Colson Whitehead, The Intuitionist; Madhu Dubey, Signs and Cities: Black Literary Postmodernism.

ASCP. 82000 - American Art: the '50's & 60's
GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Powers, [20891] Cross listed with ART 77300. Instructor permission required

This course will survey the trio of movements that revolutionized US art in the 1950s and 1960s: Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art and Minimalism.

Special attention will be paid to the critical elaboration both of Modernism and of alternatives to it in a domestic context; the roles of Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art in an international and, especially, Cold War context; the ways in which Pop art effectively sublated, rather than outright rejected, Abstract Expressionism; internal relationships between Pop Art and Minimalism, as well as contemporary responses to / reactions against Minimalism; issues of gender, race and sexual orientation that are so vital in the transition from the so-called "age of consensus" to one of activism and protest; and, dovetailing with this transition, the development of Conceptual Art toward the end of the 1960s.

Auditors by permission.

Requirements: Midterm and final exam, one short paper, in-class discussions of assigned readings.

Preliminary Readings: Harold Rosenberg, ―The American Action Painters‖ (1952); Allan Kaprow, ―The Legacy of Jackson Pollock‖ (1958); Clement Greenberg, ―Modernist Painting‖ (1960), which are available at: http://www.mediafire.com/arth [For a general introduction to the works and contexts we will be discussing: Lisa Phillips, The American Century: Art & Culture 1950-2000 (New York: Whitney Museum of American Art 1999), pp. 11-222.]

ASCP. 82000 - American Renaissance
GC: W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Reynolds, [20894] Cross listed with ENGl 75100 & WSCP 81000.

The literary flowering that occurred in the United States between 1835 and 1865 constituted one of the richest periods in literary history. Known as the American Renaissance, this period saw dazzling innovations in literary style, philosophy, and social criticism brought about by Emerson and Thoreau; the metaphysical depth and cultural breadth represented by the novels of Melville and Hawthorne; the breathtaking poetic experimentation of Whitman and Dickinson; and the psychological and artistic achievement of Edgar Allan Poe.

The issues of race and chattel slavery were powerfully depicted by Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Harriet Beecher Stowe. Political struggles and class conflict were dramatized in popular novels by George Lippard and George Thompson, and women’s issues in the fiction of Sara Parton and others.

In addition to reading central works of the American Renaissance—among them Moby-Dick, “Bartleby,” The Scarlet Letter, Leaves of Grass, Walden, Poe’s tales, Emerson’s essays, Dickinson’s poems, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Douglass’s Narrative, and several noncanonical works--we shall discuss key theoretical and critical approaches to their writings.

An oral report and a term paper are required.

ASCP. 82000 - CUNY As Lab
GC: M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Battle/Kornblum, [20904] Cross listed with SOC 81200.

All students will work on a semester-long group project conducting quantitative (survey) and qualitative (one-on-one interviews & ethnography) research on a CUNY-wide study of undergraduates. Students will receive experience in all phases of empirical research, from conceptualization to analysis and all points in between. This course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g., gender studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).

Prerequisite:  NONE



ASCP. 82000 - Brazil and the US: Comparative Paths to the Modern, 1820-1920
GC: M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Manthorne, [20892] Cross listed with ART 77300. Instructor permission required

Utilizing a global art history framework, this lecture course examines the art of Brazil and that of the United States during the long 19th c. Brazil’s transformation from a colonial, agrarian, slave society to a predominantly urban, middle-class, industrialized nation and aspiring world power demonstrates important parallels to the US, and provides a basis for comparative analysis of their pictorial productions.

Moving from the establishment of European-inflected academic instruction (1810, Philadelphia; 1816 in Rio) to the embrace of the modern (1913, Armory Show, US; 1922, Week of Modern Art, São Paulo), we identify artistic trends and cross-currents. Ultimately we pose the question: what did it mean to be modern in Brazil and in the U.S.?

After long downplaying its 19th c. art, Brazil is now coming to terms with this era. Simultaneously major exhibitions and publications are looking beyond the nation to the western hemisphere and Atlantic world as units of study. The time is ripe to incubate new understanding and research. This course also prepares students for oral examinations in art of the US and/or Latin America.

Requirements:
   Five auditors accepted, only with approval of the instructor.

Preliminary Readings:
READ Katherine Manthorne, “Remapping American Art,” American Art 22 (Fall 2008): 112-117; VIEW: American Identities, Installation of the Collection, Brooklyn Museum of Art.

ASCP. 82000 - Ethnic Politics/Comparative Perspectives
GC: W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. George, [20903] Cross listed with P SC 87800 & WSCP 81000.

This course focuses on the politics of ethnicity and nationalism, with a comparative focus. We will investigate theoretical arguments regarding the roots and power of ethnic identity and the ways that such identification enters into the political sphere. We will analyze arguments about whether and how ethnic diversity might affect political competition and conflict.

The course will examine general theories and then also hone in on identity politics in particular geographic regions including, but not limited to postcommunist Europe and Eurasia, Latin America, and South Asia. Students will also have an opportunity to read further on geographical areas of their own scholarly interest.

In addition to being a course on the subject matter of identity, students will hone their analytical skills through close readings of texts and examination of how authors construct and implement their research agenda.

Students will read the equivalent of a book per week as well as prepare written reading analyses and questions. Students will lead the discussions. There will be two exams in the course.

ASCP. 82000 - Government & Politics in NYC
GC: M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Mollenkopf, [20902] Cross listed with P SC 82510.

Political scientists have described New York City both as an exemplary case of machine politics (from Boss Tweed of Tammany Hall to Vito Lopez – just forced to step down as chairman of the Kings County Democratic Organization) and of urban reform (from Mayor LaGuardia arguably through Mayor Bloomberg).

It is a strongly liberal city, with a large municipal welfare state and a unionized public labor force, yet mayors supported by the Republican Party have governed it for the last fifteen years.

Despite having experienced tremendous racial and ethnic change, only one minority person, David Dinkins, has served even one term as mayor and no Latino has been elected to city-wide office.

This course will use the 2013 city elections as a lens for understanding the construction of electoral majorities and exercising political power in this large, complex, multicultural setting.

Students will read and discuss classic readings, conduct primary research, and consider New York in comparative perspective.


ASCP. 82000 - Immigration & Globalization
GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Alba/Foner, [20906] Cross listed with SOC 85800.

This course will provide an overview of the literature on contemporary immigration. The focus will be on the U.S., but the larger context of South-North immigration will be brought into view. Attention will be divided between theories and empirical research, as the course considers accounts of who immigrates and why and how immigrants insert themselves into the receiving society and its economy. The final part of the course will consider the impact of immigration on future ethno-racial divisions.

ASCP. 82000 - Neos & Isms
GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. O'Brien, [20901] Cross listed with P SC 82001 & WSCP 81000.


“Neos & Isms” (read intercurring conflicts between, among, and across formal and informal political institutions). This 8000-level political-science seminar prepares students for the major or minor in both the required National Institutions track and the Electoral Process track in American politics of the approved American Politics Comprehensive Reading List.*

This course, while theoretical and historical, is an American-politics seminar that crosses intradisciplinary divides by relying on PD (political development, or historical institutionalism, as it is known in comparative) as a methodology with two analytical axes of the role of ideas (stemming from a radical feminist interpretation of monism). The seminar, in other words, is informed by American Studies and Women’s Studies literature, given its emphasis on difference as the United States built a relatively strong nation-state and became a global hegemon.** It pays particular attention to nation-building in juxtaposition with the recurring, crosscutting conflicts of class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.

It includes discussions about formal and informal political institutions and identities applied to Obama and other presidents from the very late 19th through the 20th and 21st centuries, during intercurrence or in, across, and/or over time (clash of political development and political thought) or engaged with the other so-called federal branches.

In other words, it concentrates on enduring institutional and ideational juxtapositions and enduring or classic conflicts in the United States in the executive, legislative, and judicial branches as well as in the media (including social media) that effect political identities.

The intercurring conflicts raised in Part II are classic and representational ones in, across, and/or over time (contingency and history) and political time (macro historical events). They are reviewed in broad strokes to cover these enduring juxtapositions in the five federal institutions led by the American president (including the executive branch, or the bureaucracy he governs), as well as the legislative and judicial branches in play, and involving public opinion, given the role of communications in a representational democracy in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The conflicts are classic and/or representative -- involving the administrations of Andrew Johnson, Teddy Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, FDR, JFK, LBJ, and Nixon though Reagan, and giving special attention to the differences between George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

The “Neos & Isms” themselves involve thinkers, theories, and schools of thought, going so far as to explore emerging social theories (including “systematic theory” and radical feminist theory) as well as full-fledged ideologies, or values and belief structures, and political cultures that alter or affect political and economic action and behavior in every form of consciousness.

Some of the “Neos & Isms” reviewed in APD are: 1) neoconservatism and neoclassical capitalism, 2) neoliberalism (containing critiques of capitalism, liberalism, republicanism, multiculturalism, and cosmopolitanism), 3) neo-feudalism and neo-tribalism (juxtapositions found in fundamentalism, theories of supremacy, and spatial hegemony, and involving or impacting all vulnerable populations), and finally 4) multilateralism, reflecting earned egalitarianism within conceptions for horizontal domestic and transnational deliberative democracy or work on “commons.”

Relating APD methodology to “Neos & Isms” is three-dimensional from the perspective of 1) the individual (un-sub-non-full- consciousness, identity, worldview, and traditions, including those of and constructed by vulnerable and autonomous populations), 2) the five federal institutions (national, transnational, even local entities), and 3) time or contingency.

Unlike the Contemporary American Political Thought seminar, this course relies on secondary rather than primary sources that are housed in political science, American Studies, and gender studies, and found more often in qualitative research or humanistic social-science journals that address contemporary issues in science.

Students in social science and humanities are welcome and will find the reading appealing if they are intradisciplinary (American, political theory, IR, or comparative politics within political science), as will those cross-listed in humanities and other social sciences, since I also use some interdisciplinary readings from literary theory, cultural studies, particularly American Studies and Women’s Studies, and history, and make reference to science and the history of science.

Course Requirements:
The main requirement is classroom discussion and a 20- to 25-page research paper, with a possible eye to revising for publication (1- to 2-credit tutorials can supplement this, with the permission of the instructor and the EO).

Complete assigned readings, distributed via some form of Internet platform, before a set time when each class meets. Summaries and classroom participation account for 40 percent.

* Classic -- reading from reading list that is at least 10-15 years old. (See http://americanfieldexamprep.ws.gc.cuny.edu/ )

** Current -- what you should know in National Institutions from historical institutionalism, APT, APD, and cultural-studies reading IN political science or as crossover from other interdisciplinary fields, primarily my other fields of American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies. (See http://ruthobrien.ws.gc.cuny.edu/ )

ASCP. 82000 - So Bad It's Good: Postwar Visual Culture from NY  to LA
GC: W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Hadler, [20893] Cross listed with ART 87300. Instructor permission required


This course will examine the visual culture of the postwar era from the Kitchen Debate to the populuxe automobile with enough chrome embellishments for designer Raymond Loewy to deem them “jukeboxes on wheels.”

Postwar science fiction, the atomic kitchen, the camp aesthetic, advertising strategies, and mass culture debates will be among the topics addressed. The sets and content of the award winning television series, Mad Men, show us that the discussion of objects from this era is a far cry from being exhausted.
 

Requirements: Course requirements include a seminar report and a final paper. Auditors permitted.

Preliminary readings:
Books: Jeffrey L. Meikle, Design in the USA, Oxford University Press, 2005
Susan Sontag, “Notes on Camp” 1964

ASCP. 82000 - Readings in African-American History
GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Stein, [20897] Cross listed with HIST 79500 & WSCP 81000.

This course explores major historical subjects in post-emancipation African-American history. We will examine recent literature, and assumptions underlying such work, on the following topics: Reconstruction, Jim Crow, migration, class structure and ideology, nationalism, culture, New Deal, civil rights movement, "black power," and what is often called the "post-civil rights" world.

ASCP. 82000 - Studies in the Current Season
GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Carlson, [20907] Cross listed with THEA 81400.

This course will be built around class visits to five current New York productions during the term.

Around each production will be gathered a set of historical and theoretical readings to contextualize and discuss that production. The selection of productions will attempt to cover as wide a range as possible of theatrical approaches, including plays representative of different traditions, historical periods, and dramatic types.

Before the beginning of classes in the Spring the first two or three productions will have been chosen, but others will probably not be selected until later in the season, to take advantage of later announcements.

Every effort will be made to procure reduced or student seating prices, but students should be prepared to spend up to $200 for theatre admissions. No textbooks, however, will be required.

Assignments: Students will be asked to submit two reports on additional productions.

ASCP. 82000 - The Music of Charles Ives
GC: W, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Rm. 3491, 3 credits, Prof. Blum, [20900] Cross listed with MUS 86000.

The seminar interrogates prominent (and less prominent) interpretations of the musical relations between African Americans and European Americans in the first century after the Civil War. The “interrogation” is “enhanced” through analysis of both the theoretical presuppositions and the practical consequences of the various approaches. The seminar in not intended as a chronological survey, and some familiarity with the music history of the U.S. in this period is highly desirable. The workload includes weekly reading and listening assignments (to be discussed in class by each participant), small exercises, and a final paper on an approved topic.

Open only to doctoral students (in any program). Not open to auditors.

ASCP. 82000 - US & Middle East Relations: 1944-present
GC: R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, [20898] Cross listed with HIST 75600 & MES 73900.

This course examines the historical roots and rise of U.S. involvement in the Middle East and Muslim world. Students will develop a strong grasp of the major issues, themes, and debates relating to the U.S. involvement in the Arab-Israeli conflict, especially support for the state of Israel; the rise of revolutionary nationalist movements, evident in Egypt, Iraq, Iran, and Libya; America’s dependence on petroleum, demonstrated through U.S. support for right-wing dictatorships in Iran and Saudi Arabia, the oil boycotts of the 1970s, and the first Persian Gulf war. The course will also explore the social and cultural trends of the post-World War II era evidenced in film, media, and literature that have contributed to the gap between the west and the Muslim world. All of these topics will help explore the roots of 9/11 and explain how and why the United States currently finds itself embroiled in many of its current conflicts abroad.

ASCP. 82000 - Work, Labor & Labor Movements
GC: W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Aronowitz, [20905] Cross listed with SOC 83105.

This course is an examination of the transformation in the structure of labor during the post-world war two era. Among the topics under consideration is the effects of technology and the emergence of the global economy on the nature of work, the fate of the labor movement, and their influences on working class and salaried labor. We will explore the distinction between work and labor We will also interrogate the responses of secondary and post -secondary education to changed work, the geographic dispersal of large sections of the labor force and the ideologies that have accompanied deindustrialization.

Among the works that will be discussed are: Joshua Freeman Working Class New York; Jefferson Cowie Stayin’ Alive; C Wright Mills White Collar; Frank Bardacke Trampling Out the Vintage (on farm workers); Michael Honey Going Down Jericho Road (on Martin Luther King and the Memphis Garbage Workers); Stanley Aronowitz False Promises (Selections); Hannah Arendt The Human Condition; Andre Gorz Critique of Economic Reason; Bruno Gulli Labor of Fire; Michael Goldfield The Decline of Organized Labor in the United States; Arlie Hochschild The Second Shift. Also work on immigrant workers by Immanuel Ness, and poor workers’ unions. Articles on the rebellious Chinese Workers, Occupy Wall Street as a labor movement. Some of these books and articles will be student presentations; others will be presented by the instructor.

ASCP 82000- Reassessing Inequality & Reimagining the 21st Century                                                                                                 GC:   T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Cahill/Luttrell, [20982] Cross listed with IDS. 81640, PSYC 80103, MALS, P SC

Engaging broad questions of economic inequality and its impact on the “commons,” or public sphere, this seminar will combine a political economic analysis with an examination of lived experiences, counter-narratives and everyday forms of resistance; and consider the role that new technologies can play in offering alternative ways to document, study, and resist inequalities.  

The seminar will engage these issues from the ground-up, as they play out in a particular place, East Harlem (El Barrio/Spanish Harlem).
East Harlem (El Barrio/Spanish Harlem) is a neighborhood saturated with complex personal and collective narratives of demographic change, economic hardship, vibrant cultural creativity, social movements, community organizations, and decades of public representations as a site of urban poverty.

Keeping in mind how growing inequality in wealth, income, and debt is affecting public services and institutions, the seminar will take a particular look at housing and public education.

The course will take a hybrid form – including face-to-face weekly sessions situated in a digitally mediated environment. The course will also include community engagement events and participatory research in East Harlem.  Sessions will  be facilitated by CUNY faculty members drawn from a range of social science and humanities disciplines, and will include a prominent list of intellectuals, activists, and experts drawn locally and from around the world, with unique expertise on various aspects of inequality.

Simultaneously, this course will engage critical questions with regards to how new technologies can be used for community-engaged teaching and scholarship. The course will offer a different take on the “MOOC” (massively open, online course), here re-conceived as a “POOC” a participatory, open, online course that hopes to engage community members, and people from around the world, in dialogue with the ideas in the course.
 

The seminar is designed to problematize issues related to representations of inequality; notions of community; and useable and meaningful research while simultaneously providing access to, and motivation for using, new digital tools and methods for addressing inequality.

 

#########################################################

FALL 2012


ASCP. 81000 - Introduction to American Studies: Histories & Methods GC: M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Humphries, [19288] Cross listed with MALS 73200.

Russ Castronovo and Susan Gillman begin the introduction to their recent collection States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies (2009), with a seemingly straightforward question: “What is the object of American studies?” For Castronovo and Gilman, this question leads directly to two others: “What does ‘American studies’ study, and what does it want?” The object of this course is to explore these questions by considering the histories, theories, and practices of the interdisciplinary field of American studies, from its inception as an academic discipline to its present “state of emergency.” Using the first publication of American Quarterly in 1949 as a starting point, we will consider how American studies has been transformed from a movement into an institution represented by one of the largest and most widely recognized annual academic conferences in the United States. The collection edited by Castronovo and Gillman is one of the most recent attempts to recalibrate and redefine the field of American studies, but the impulse it represents is as old as the field itself. For all of its centrality, American studies remains an anomaly in the academy: Generally organized as a program and not a department, it resides somewhere between (or, perhaps, outside) normative disciplinary boundaries and in sometimes productive, sometimes uneasy relations to the other “studies” which have been created in part on its model. During this semester we will consider the complexity inherent in this model, as we trace the influence of both seminal and emerging work in American studies. We will also consider the different meanings that American studies has (and has had) for different disciplines, and attempt to take stock of its current position in the academy and in our own work.
 

ASCP. 81500 - Core Seminar in Political Science GC:R, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. O'Brien, [19300] Cross listed with P SC 71000.

All incoming students pursuing a Ph.D. and an MA* in political science are strongly encouraged to take this seminar for the purpose of knitting us all into a life-long community or collectivity of intellectuals who are passionate about politics. Every student in political science studies some aspect of power. They examine power in abstraction (political theory), or power from the perspective of our nation-state (American politics), among foreign nation-states (comparative politics), or between nation-states (international relations). As a global hegemon, the United States also exerts formal and informal influence, manifested formally as American foreign policy or informally as American cultural or economic hegemony (American Studies). This seminar explores theoretical questions associated with culture and resistance, particularly involving identity, and inciting American or global social movements. Finally, it refers to the American exportation of the rule of law in terms of the Americanization of Europe (neo-classical capitalism, neo-liberalism, new empires, fundamentalism), or the European Union (EU), as well as the exportation of the Anglo-Saxon and Enlightenment culture(s) of civil rights, civil liberties, and human rights, manifested in the Yoo brief, the Gitmo Supreme Court cases, and the Veil controversy, and the use of Shari'a tribunals at home and abroad. (1 credit tutorials also available with my permission & EO permission).

ASCP. 81500 - Geographic Theory & Thought GC: R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [19290] Cross listed with ANTH 81700 & EES 79903. Permission of instructor required.

ASCP. 81500 - History of CUNY GC: W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Brier/Picciano, [19303] Cross listed with U ED 75100.

The City University of New York (CUNY) is the largest urban public university in the United States, enrolling more than 500,000 matriculating students and adult and continuing education students in its 24 colleges and schools. CUNY traces its roots to the opening of the Free Academy (later The City College) in 1847, with the stated mission of “educating the children of the whole people.” New York’s municipal college system grew steadily with the addition of Hunter College in 1870 and Queens and Brooklyn colleges in the 1930s. It wasn’t until 1961 that the City University of New York was formally established.

This research seminar examines this great university’s unique history and contribution to New York City and the world. In addition to CUNY’s early years, the seminar will review the system’s colleges, people and policies over the past half century, including the fight over open admissions in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the impact of the city’s fiscal crisis of the mid-1970s, the battle over remediation in the 1990s, and contemporary issues related to state and city fiscal support, faculty governance, tuition increases and the rise of a strong central administration.

Any student interested in the evolution of urban higher education will find this seminar an invaluable source of information and discussion. The seminar leaders--one a U.S. social historian; the other an educational policy expert--between them have more than 70 years of experience working in this “people’s university.”

ASCP. 81500 - Materializing the Good Life GC: M, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Chuh, [19295] Cross listed with ENGL 80600 & WSCP 81000.

What does it mean to live ‘the good life’? What does it mean now, when normative definitions – of the good life as equivalent to economy stability, educational access, freedom from state intrusion – seem ever less available to ever greater numbers of people? What has it meant historically, and how have these meanings been conditioned and even compelled by the political, cultural, economic, and affective structures that have characterized different times?

Who is successful in achieving the good life, who fails, and in both cases, with what effects? This course will undertake to address such questions by working with and through a set of key concepts including liberalism, neoliberalism, humanism, secularism, and cosmopolitanism.

We will work by assessing the theoretical and philosophical grounds and aesthetic modalities through which ‘the good life’ has been stabilized conceptually and materially, by and for whom, and to theorize ways of living and knowing alternative to dominant definitions through our engagements with the literary-cultural and theoretical texts anchoring the course.

Students enrolled in this course are asked to read J. Jack Halberstam’s, The Queer Art of Failure, prior to the first day of class. We will also read work as wide-ranging as that by Lauren Berlant, Wendy Brown, Immanuel Kant, Janet Jakobsen, Chandan Reddy, Sianne Ngai, Cedric Robinson, Jean Luc Nancy, Lisa Duggan, Jodi Melamed, Achille Mbembe, Friedrich Schiller, and Eve Segwick, as well as literary/cultural works that we collectively identify in the first days of the course.

Students taking the class for 4 credits should expect to produce two short papers and a longer seminar project. Students taking the class for 2 credits will be asked to write and present a conference-length paper (10 pages) to complete the requirements of the course.

ASCP. 81500 - Photography/American West/Myth/Hist GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Manthorne, [19291] Cross listed with ART 79000. Art History department permission required.
Photography’s beginnings and early development parallel Euro-American exploration and settlement of the American West. This lecture course interrogates that intertwined relationship beginning with the daguerreotypes of the Mexican-American War and terminating with early western movies. It presents a social history that interrogates how photography shaped the popular conception of the West, and how the visual exploration of the region expanded the medium. Our topics include railroad promotional commissions; photographic work of the great post-Civil War surveys (1867-1879) headed by F.V. Hayden, Clarence King, George M. Wheeler, and John Wesley Powell; shifting patterns of representing the American Indian; and the role of women photographers in the western territories. Photography’s distinct strategies for documenting history and embodying myth are identified via comparisons with western painters Catlin, Bierstadt, and Moran. The display and distribution of photographs via exhibitions, stereographic viewers, albums, and illustrated books are examined. The course includes several visits to major photographic collections and one class devoted to demonstrations of historic cameras, lens, field work, and wet plate collodion techniques.
Requirements: midterm and final examinations including image identification and essays; participation in weekly discussions on readings; a 10 page written research paper, with related abstract, annotated bibliography, and short oral presentation.
Preliminary reading: Martha A. Sandweiss. Print the Legend. Photography and the American West. New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2002.

ASCP. 81500 - Readings in US Women's History GC: M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. McCarthy, [19297] Cross listed with HIST 74300 & WWCP 81000.

ASCP. 81500 - Mic Check: Rhetorics of Power and Resistance in the Aftermath of Occupy  GC: R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Shor, [19293] Cross listed with ENGL 79010.

In the late 20th century, Vaclav Havel exhorted idealists to "speak truth to power." Playwright and politician, Havel proposed that democratic discourse could undermine undemocratic oligarchies. Such dreams and discourses moved millions to bury the crony regimes of Eastern Europe. Thus continued a remarkable history of non-violent transformation which can trace its roots to the Ghandian campaigns before 1948 in India and to the great American Civil Rights Movement in the U.S in the 1950s-1970s.

Confronting entrenched and armed oligarchies is formidable anywhere, yet the weapons of rhetoric have been strangely enabling in democratic struggles.

Opposition movements have undermined the "regimes of truth" and the "legitimate language" which Foucault and Bourdieu separately named as discursive tools for domination. A bevy of police states from the Baltic to the Adriatic fell by 1991. More recently, an Arab Spring spread across borders with some spectacular successes and some major setbacks, with the Egyptian story heavily-marked by communications strategies.

Then, in September, 2011, a handful of creative activists physically occupied Zuccotti Park near Wall Street, encamping in a tent village, launching an "Occupy Movement" in the Capitol of Capital. For two months, the village morphed into new expressive shapes, attracting tens of thousands to witness if indeed "another world is possible," one that challenges the vast economic inequality damaging American life. By the time the Occupy camp was destroyed by a violent police assault in November, it had become an intolerable built challenge to the legitimate authority of Wall Street and the oligarchy represented by billionaire Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The camp embodied, uttered and projected alternative ways of being and seeing, and was an incubator of alternative rhetoric.

Among the alternatives practiced in this transformative space were "horizontal" social relations. A horizontal rather than a vertical rhetoric structured its meetings. Open general assemblies operated horizontally with rotating chairpeople and with "stacks" to determine speaking order based on social power of speakers, that is, who speaks most and least in such public spheres, which individuals and groups were socially ascribed lesser or greater authority to speak in public(challenging what Paulo Freire called "the culture of silence").

Occupy also generated autonomous working-groups which copied the horizontal structure of the general assemblies. Most notable, perhaps, Occupy also installed "the human microphone" as a public-address system. Denied legal use of sound-amplification at Zuccotti by the police, general assemblies and other large meetings practiced group repetition of a speaker’s remarks in a now-famous choral method. The human microphone also emerged as a tool for assertion of utterances at public protests where an individual’s call of "mic check!" assembled the human micropohone for amplification as well as for relaying instructions.

With Occupy camps now driven out public spaces, this seminar will study horizontal discourse and rhetorical resistance emerging from the protests.

For background on the conflict of hegemonic and counter-hegemonic discourses, we will study the relevant work of Foucault, Bourdieu, Chomsky, James Scott, David Graeber, Paulo Freire, Ngugi Wa Thiongo, and Goran Therborn, among others. Lots of discussion during seminar meetings, weekly journals on the readings, final project.

ASCP. 81500 - Seminar in American History I GC: R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kessner, [19299] Cross listed with HIST 84900.

This seminar is designed to train incoming graduate students in the craft of historical research and writing. Over the course of the term, each student will formulate a research topic, prepare a bibliography of relevant primary and secondary sources, write an historiographic essay, and present and defend a formal project proposal for the substantial research paper that is to be completed in the second semester seminar. Weekly meetings will discuss common readings, share and critique written work, and develop and refine the research proposals. We will also be devoting some time to methods and issues involved in undergraduate teaching.

Students should focus primarily on framing a topic and honing a well defined, focused and reasonable research question for their papers. The purpose of the collateral assignments is to help push this process forward. Thus, from the very beginning students should be thinking about their research project, sampling secondary readings and investigating the availability of accessible sources.

Course learning objectives: Familiarize students with the full range of issues we confront as historians trying to do original work: how to pose researchable questions, how to find and cull through sources, how to weigh and interpret evidence, construct arguments, and situate one’s own arguments in a wider field of debate in the field.

Syllabus and reading list available in the Certificate Programs Office (Room 5110).

ASCP. 81500 - Serial Narrative GC: T, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Dolan, [19292] Cross listed with ENGL 76300.

This course will consider the popularity and peculiar aesthetics of longform, open narratives over the last two hundred years, from the romans-feuilleton of Eugene Sue’s day down to the web serials of our own.

The specific balance of classes will be determined by student interest but the course will be purposely multimedia, probably including classes on the following topics: Victorian magazine serials; the silent film-and-newspaper serials of the Progressive/Edwardian era; Irna Philips’ creation of the soap opera in Chicago radio (and its continuation into the television era); the shift from yellowback and pulp novels into comic books during the 1940s; and the continued popularity and reinvention of Coronation Street and Doctor Who.

Some attention will also be paid to the effect serialization has on conceptually closed narratives (e.g., Dickens and James’ encounters with serialization; telenovelas).

Secondary readings will be drawn from structuralist narratology and media studies. Students from all area groups are welcome, and they will be encouraged to choose topics for their final projects that tie the course’s more general themes and technologies into their specific area of focus.

ASCP. 81500 - Social Movements GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Jasper, [19301] Cross listed with SOC 84600

This course has two purposes. First, to introduce students to the main currents in research and theory on social movements and protest, second, to focus on micro-level processes within them, such as meaning making, emotions, and decision making. We will especially highlight decisions as one way that these micro-foundations come together to shape actions and outcomes, in an emerging strategic and cultural approach.

Students will lead class discussions.

Written assignments include three memos and a Wikipedia essay.


After completing this course, students should be able to teach courses on social movements at the undergraduate level and should be able to identify researchable questions at the cutting edge of the field.


ASCP. 81500 - Theory Colloquium GC: T, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Reid-Pharr, [19294] Cross listed with ENGL 80100.

In this seminar we will place the concept of the "Black Atlantic" into both its historical and theoretical contexts. Beginning with C.L.R. James’s The Black Jacobins and ending with Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic we will trace the development of Atlantic Studies, paying particular attention to slavery, travel, cultural contact and transformation.

Other texts that we will examine include: Cedric Robinson, Black Marxism: The Making of a Black Radical Tradition, Michael A. Gomez, Exchanging Our Country Marks: The Transformation of African Identities in the Colonial and Antebellum South; Eric Williams, Capitalism and Slavery; Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History; Susan Buck-Morss, Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History; Paul Gilroy, There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack: The Cultural Politics of Race and Nation; Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route; Lewis Gordon, Fanon and the Crisis of European Man: An Essay on Philosophy and the Human Sciences; Peter Linebaugh, The Many Headed Hydra: Sailors, Slaves, Commoners and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic; Laura Doyle, Freedom’s Empire: Race and the Rise of the novel in Atlantic Modernity, 1640 – 1940.

ASCP. 81500 - Towards a Networked Academy GC: M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gold, [19296] Cross listed with MALS 75400 & ENGL 89020.

The growth and popularization of the digital humanities (DH) in recent years has highlighted the many ways in which computational tools are being brought to bear upon humanities scholarship and teaching. Recent methodological experiments in the digital humanities – quantitative approaches to literary history, algorithmic methods of text analysis and visualization, public forms of peer-to-peer review, and interactive pedagogies for the open web – have helped scholars re-imagine the basic nature and forms of academic research and teaching across a range of disciplines.

But what is the digital humanities, and why should we care about it? What kinds of questions can DH make legible that other modes of academic inquiry conceal? Is the digital humanities a field unto itself, or is it simply a set of methodologies that can be applied in multiple fields? Will there be a point at which digital tools will be so pervasive that the field we now call "digital humanities" will simply be known as the "humanities"?

This course will explore these and other questions through a set of historical, theoretical, and methodological readings that trace the rise and popularization of the digital humanities over the past two decades. Students will be introduced to emerging debates in the digital humanities and will become familiar with some of the fundamental skills necessary to develop and analyze digital humanities projects. We will examine and critique a range of such projects and begin to sketch out possible undertakings of our own.

A central aim of this course is to involve students in the rich and evolving constellation of spaces in which networked conversations are reshaping the norms of scholarly communication. These spaces include blogs and Twitter, which, as MLA Director of Scholarly Communication Kathleen Fitzpatrick has pointed out in "Networking the Field," scholars are using "as a means of getting feedback on work in progress or as an alternative channel through which an author can reach an audience more quickly and directly." We will analyze the benefits and drawbacks of this new conversational ecosystem that surrounds digital humanities work.

Readings will include texts and projects by Ian Bogost, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Dan Cohen, Cathy Davidson, Johanna Drucker, Jason Farman, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Matthew Kirschenbaum, Peter Krapp, Alan Liu, Tara McPherson, Franco Moretti, Bethany Nowviskie, Stephen Ramsay, Geoffrey Rockwell, Tom Scheinfeldt, Michael Witmore, and Jonathan Zittrain, among others.

No technical skills are required, though a willingness to experiment (and even fail) with DH tools is crucial. Class assignments will include weekly engagements with and participation on our class blog and Twitter feed; contributions to a collaborative Zotero bibliography; an oral presentation on a DH project; and a final project in one of the following forms: a seminar paper (~20 pages), a detailed DH project proposal, or a substantive contribution to a new or existing DH project.

ASCP. 81500 - Urban Com Stud: City as Social Laboratory GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kornblum, [19302] Cross listed with SOC 85600.

This course will explore a number of themes in urban sociology, as represented by readings that include the essays in Sennett (ed.) Classic Essays in the Culture of Cities, and work by Wilson, Benjamin, Duneier, Zukin, Kornblum, Goffman, Lefebvre, Harvey, and others. Class discussion based on the readings, and my involvements in research on the area , will help us develop a set of empirical questions to explore in Manhattan’s Midtown during the semester. Emphasis will be on using themes in social theory to generate actual research in the field.
 

ASCP. 82000 - Abolitionism & the Origins of the Civil War GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Oakes, [19309] Cross listed with HIST 75700.

ASCP. 82000 - Readings in African American Literary and Cultural Theory GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Reid-Pharr, [19306] Cross listed with ENGL 85500 & WSCP 81000.

Focusing primarily on travel and space, this seminar will introduce students to some of the more significant recent critical and theoretical trends within the study of Black American literature and culture.

Participants will be asked both if it is possible to produce a specifically black literary criticism and whether Black American identity is effected, manipulated, challenged or perhaps even erased within "peculiar" performative or spatial contexts.

At the same time, the course will examine how African American Studies intersects with and challenges Feminist Studies, Gay and Lesbian Studies, Ethnic Studies, and American Studies.

Students will be asked to write several short papers during the course of the semester. They will also do at least one in class presentation

ASCP. 82000 - American Politics GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Polsky, [19313] Cross listed with P SC 72000.

ASCP. 82000 - American Pragmatism GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Godfrey-Smith, [19311] Cross listed with PHIL 77400.
A survey of work by the 'classical' pragmatists (Peirce, James, Dewey) followed by a look at some more recent thinkers including Rorty, Price, and Brandom. Dewey's 1925 book Experience and Nature will get the most attention. The focus will be on epistemological, metaphysical, and meta-philosophical issues, not on value theory or politics.

ASCP. 82000 - Colonial & Early Federal American Literature GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Reynolds, [19305] Cross listed with ENGL 75000.

American literature cannot be fully understood without a familiarity with its rich, varied early phase, which extends from the narratives of European explorers of the New World through seventeenth-century Puritan poetry and prose to the eighteenth-century literature of enlightenment, revolution, national founding, and early romanticism.

This course examines this formative period of American literature. Besides covering the full range of colonial and early federal writings, we probe various critical and theoretical approaches to American literature. In particular, transnational, circumatlantic, and cultural-studies approaches, which have been prominent in recent Americanist criticism, are drawn upon for insights into this literature, much of which is preoccupied with questions of transatlantic exchange, colonialism, and diaspora.

Among the topics considered are encounters between European settlers and ethnic others; ongoing efforts to define America and Americanness in transatlantic contexts; the culture and aesthetics of New England Puritanism (crucial for understanding later writers such as Emerson, Hawthorne, and Melville); the innovative poetry of Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor; the seminal contributions to philosophy and homiletics by Jonathan Edwards; African Americans and slavery, including the earliest known examples of slave narratives; Native American writing, such as the Winnebago trickster cycle; the Indian captivity narrative; women’s writings, such as Judith Sargent Murrary’s feminist prose and Susanna Rowson’s popular novel Charlotte Temple; public and autobiographical writings by Jefferson, Franklin, Adams, Paine, and Hamilton; and the American Gothic fiction of Philadelphia’s Charles Brockden Brown.

Course requirements include a term paper and an oral report on a work of criticism.
 

ASCP. 82000 - Democracy: Inequality & Reprssion GC: M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Markovitz, [19314] Cross listed with P SC 87800.

ASCP. 82000 - W.E.B. DuBois: Scholar, Essayist, Activist GC:  T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Watts, [19307] Cross listed with ENGL 85500.

This seminar offers an intensive investigation of the life and writings of W.E.B. DuBois. Through discussions of his major and minor writings, we will be able to chart dominant as well as oppositional currents in American/Afro-American thought.

DuBois emerged as a distinct intellectual presence during the last decade of the 19th century and would continue to publish until his death in 1963. Moreover, throughout his entire adult life, DuBois was a political activist in behalf of the freedom struggle of Afro-Americans; obtaining self-determination for colonized peoples throughout the world; and in his later life, the Soviet Union led world communist struggle against capitalism.

His political activism informed his intellectual output and vice versa. As a writer, DuBois wore many intellectual hats during his lifetime: historian The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States of America (1896) and Black Reconstruction in America; sociologist, The Philadelphia Negro (1899); essayist, The Souls of Black Folks (1903) and Darkwater: Voices From Within the Veil (1920); autobiographer, Dusk of Dawn: An Essay towards an Autobiography of a Race Concept (1940); political polemicist and agitator through his editorial writings in The Crisis, the journal of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; and finally, novelist (I count his novels among his minor works).

The DuBois corpus is far too large to discuss in any single semester, consequently, we will read selectively from his works.

Nevertheless, the course is reading intensive and will require participation in class discussions, several short papers and one longer research paper.

ASCP. 82000 - Immigrant Families GC: R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Korn-Burstyn, [19318] Cross listed with U ED 71100.
In this seminar we will explore the perspectives of immigrant families residing in New York City on education and schooling, and examine how families negotiate relations with schools. The interaction between immigrant families and schools provides fertile ground for a meeting of social imaginations - the familial and the pedagogic - providing ground for shared purpose and for clarifying barriers to genuine engagement. In this seminar, we will identify and study causes of potential tension and conflict as well as opportunities for engagement between families and schools. We will explore the often vast gaps between immigrant families’ cultures of origin and the cultures of urban schools, while pointing to the ways in which schools can develop relationships of trust with families.

ASCP. 82000 - Law, Politics and Policy GC: M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Rollins, [19312] Cross listed with MALS 70300 & P SC 71904.

This course will introduce students to the dominant methodologies of legal analysis found in the social sciences. Different sections of the course will examine foundational texts of the Law & Society movement, surveying, for example, major contributions from political science, sociology, criminology, psychology, and other empirically grounded disciplines. It is designed to expose students to legal formalism (in the Langdellian sense of formalism), and to introduce them to legal institutions and reasoning, including statutes, legislation, and precedent.

ASCP. 82000 - Magazine Photography, 1890's-1950's GC: R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Pelizzari, [19304] Cross listed with ART 89000. Department permission required.
Recent scholarship in photography has focused on the context of magazine publications, investigating the works of individual photographers in relationship to a complex web of editorial strategies dealing with politics, glamour, and commerce. Introduced in newspapers and illustrated weeklies in the 1880s, photography became a potent vehicle for communication in the 1920s, with the technical improvements of photogravure and rotogravure and the creation of spectacular layouts of images and text. These photographs contributed to a media craze that responded to the tempo of modern life and that fostered transnational histories across Germany, Russia, France, Italy, Spain, and the United States. The course explores how photographers negotiated with editors and media tycoons who directed the destiny of production and reception of their images on a global scale.
Requirements: A research project that includes an abstract, a bibliography, and a final paper discussing a picture-essay or a particular theme from an original magazine cover found in New York City libraries [a list of collections will be distributed in class].
Preliminary readings:
Thomas Michael Gunther, “The Spread of Photography. Commissions, advertising, publishing,” in Michel Frizot., The New History of Photography (Köln: Könemann, 1998): 555-581.Mary Panzer, Introduction to Things as They Are. Photojournalism in Context since 1955, (London: Chris Boot, 2006): 9-33.
Siegfried Kracauer, ‘Photography’ (1927), in Thomas Levin, ed., The Mass Ornament: Weimar essays (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1995): 47-63.

ASCP. 82000 - People of New York City GC: W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Helmreich, [19316] Cross listed with SOC 82301. Course open to Sociology students only.

This course looks at the different neighborhoods/communities that make up this great and fascinating city. Its focus is on the different ethnic, religious, and racial groups in the city and their social and cultural life-----Hispanics, Jews, Arabs, Asians, African Americans, Greeks, Italians, and people of differing socioeconomic and gender groups. In addition, we will be looking at the neighborhoods themselves, their  architectural and spatial characteristics, how  and why they grew, and how they function as communities.
An integral part of the course will be field work---visiting and studying the areas-----Bensonhurst, Carroll Gardens, Gerritsen Beach, the South Bronx, Chelsea, Glendale, Maspeth, Harlem, etc., etc. Readings will reflect the above topics


ASCP. 82000 - Sociology of Gender GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Eisenstein, [19315] Cross listed with SOC 73200 & WSCP 81000.

This course is an introduction to the sociology of gender, and can be used by students to prepare for an orals field in gender. Topics to be covered will include some of the following: gender and imperialism; globalization and women’s labor; race, class and the critique of intersectionality; feminist/womanist theory; the body, sexuality and heteronormativity; families and housework; incarceration and gender; capitalism, consumerism, and the uses of gender identity; reproductive rights and population control; violence and rape culture; migration; public life, neoliberalism and welfare; Islam, Christianity and the state; and colonialism and indigenous identities. Guest lecturers from Sociology and other GC programs will be invited to join us during the semester.

ASCP. 82000 - Spanish in the U.S. GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Otheguy, [19317] Cross listed with LING 75600 & SPAN 80100. Permission required.

The main purpose of the seminar is for students to carry out research on the Spanishes spoken and written in the United States, using either the paradigm of variationist sociolinguistics or that of the sociology of language. Under variationist sociolinguistics, the student will organize and carry out a small research project on a variable feature of the lexicon, phonology or grammar of Spanishes as spoken or written in New York or other parts of the US. Under the sociology of language, the student’s paper will be on attitudes toward these forms of speech, or their social and demographic distribution, on code selection, on maintenance and shift, on Spanish-language media, on language in the schools, or on some other relevant topic. A second purpose of the course is for the student to become familiar with the salient works of the research literature on the topic, with an emphasis on variationist works. The instructor will conduct classes in Spanish. Questions in class, and class dialogue in general, can be in either English or Spanish according to student preferences. Written work can be in English or Spanish. Some readings will be in English and some in Spanish.

ASCP. 82000 - Studying Urban Schools GC: M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Semel, [19319] Cross listed with U ED 75100.
This course examines the history of different types of urban schools, including public, independent, Catholic and their different types of pedagogic practices, traditional and progressive. Through a number of school histories, students will analyze the ways in which urban schools have changed over time and how, despite significant social, political and educational change, there has been significant constancy. The course will examine a number of themes, including issues of race. social class, ethnicity and gender, differences in place (urban schools as different?), differences in types of schools (i.e. public vs. private), differences in curriculum and pedagogy (i.e. traditional and progressive), the role of particular schools in educational reform, constancy and change in urban schooling, and methods for writing school histories.

ASCP. 82000 - US Culture/Society/Politics, 1928-1988 GC: M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Nasaw, [19308] Cross listed with HIST 75400. 

ASCP. 82000 - US in 1920's: Music & Culture GC: F, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Taylor, [19310] Cross listed with MUS 86200.

During the 1920s music and musicians served as both causes and effects in social history.  Seen in the larger context of the aftermath of World War 1, the technology boom (especially in recording, radio, and film), Prohibition, the emergence of organized crime, the Harlem Renaissance, the early history of jazz, and many literary and artistic movements, music becomes a lens through which to examine radical shifts in America’s views on gender, race, class, and a host of other issues.  And in this setting, discussions of what the term “Modernism” meant during the decade can be particularly fruitful. Though readings will be taken from a wide variety of primary and secondary sources, a central focus will be on listening—both in and out of class. The course will explore work by musicians and composers as diverse as George Gershwin, Aaron Copland, Henry Cowell, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Dane Rudhyar, Ruth Crawford, and several others. Assignments will consist of weekly written responses to reading and listening, discussion-leading, a midterm writing assignment, and a final project that will incorporate a class presentation and final paper.